Fates

The Norns of Norse-German-Scandinavian mythology spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. The Norns introduce the last act of Gotterdammerung, Wagner's fourth opera of the Ring cycle

VILA - The name Vila refers to a female elf in Slavic mythology. #Mythology

Vila - Any of a class of Slavic dryads, tree-spirits who are exclusively female. They are often vicious and cruel, and have a dire reputation

Baba Yaga or Baba Roga (also known by various other names) is a haggish or witchlike character in Slavic folklore. She flies around on a giant pestle, kidnaps (and presumably eats) small children, and lives in a hut that stands on chicken legs. In most Slavic folk tales, she is portrayed as an antagonist; however, some characters in other mythological folk stories have been known to seek her out for her wisdom, and she has been known on rare occasions to offer guidance to lost souls.

very cool, baba yaga and baba roga share same screen - Ivica Stevanovic

Baba Yaga.  by *Himmapaan

'She threw her comb – and there grew up a deep and terrifying forest' ~ Niroot Puttapipat, Baba Yaga, Illustration for 'Myths and Legends of Russia' by Aleksandr Afanas'ev, Folio Society, 2009

Baba Yaga.  by *Himmapaan

'She threw her comb – and there grew up a deep and terrifying forest' ~ Niroot Puttapipat, Baba Yaga, Illustration for 'Myths and Legends of Russia' by Aleksandr Afanas'ev, Folio Society, 2009

Devana (Dziewanna) is the #Slavic #goddess of the #hunt and #wildlife. #MYTHOLOGY

Devana (Dziewanna) is the Slavic goddess of the hunt and wildlife - basically an equivalent of the Roman goddess Diana.


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