Time in art

Time in art

timeinart.altervista.org
Are the artists able to "catch" the time?
Time in art
More ideas from Time in art
Marilyn Arsem - 100 Ways to Consider Time, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2015

BOSTON — There are so many layers to Marilyn Arsem’s piece at the Museum of Fine Arts that it's a bit hard to know where to start.

Marilyn Arsem - 100 Ways to Consider Time, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2015

BOSTON — There are so many layers to Marilyn Arsem’s piece at the Museum of Fine Arts that it's a bit hard to know where to start.

Marilyn Arsem - 100 Ways to Consider Time, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2015

Marilyn Arsem - 100 Ways to Consider Time, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2015

Marilyn Arsem - 100 Ways to Consider Time, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2015

(video by Heather Kapplow)

Marilyn Arsem - 100 Ways to Consider Time, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2015

BOSTON — There are so many layers to Marilyn Arsem’s piece at the Museum of Fine Arts that it's a bit hard to know where to start.

Michael Wesley - Open Shutter Projekt, 2001-2004

It’s difficult to believe that a photographer is capable of successfully creating a three-year long exposure on just one single frame, however, German photographer Michael Wesely shows that it’s possible in his series entitled Open Shutter.

Michael Wesley - Open Shutter Projekt, 2001-2004

German photographer Michael Wesely has spent decades working on techniques for extremely long camera exposures — usually between two to three years.

Michael Wesley - Open Shutter Projekt, 2001-2004

‘Long Exposure’ 4 April 1997 – 4 June 1999 Potsdamer Platz, Berlin Chromogenic color print Michael Wesely has been inventing and refining techniques for making photographs with unusually long exposures-some as long as three years.