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labor/labor history


labor/labor history

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Oregon Women’s History Project: list of historic buildings and sites associated with women!

Oregon Women’s History Project: list of historic buildings and sites associated with women!

French feminist group La Barbe protests lack of female directors at #Cannes Film Festival @labarbelabarbe

French feminist group La Barbe protests lack of female directors at #Cannes Film Festival @labarbelabarbe

July 16, 1934: After the brutality of “Bloody Thursday” (see July 5), the Joint Marine Strike Committee calls for a general strike. The San Francisco Labor Council voted to support the call and on July 16, the city shut down as workers from all industries walked off the job. The four-day San Francisco General Strike ended with an agreement on arbitration in which most of the striking longshoremen’s demands were met.

June 24, 1880: Agnes Nestor is born. Nestor, who began working in a glove factory at age 14, helped to found the International Glove Workers Union and served in various leadership positions within the union from 1903-1948, including president. She helped organize unions in other industries, campaigned for women's suffrage, a minimum wage, and maternity health legislation, and against child labor.

June 4, 1912: Massachusetts establishes a Minimum Wage Commission to “inquire into the wages paid to the female employees in any occupation in the commonwealth, if the Commission has reason to believe that the wages paid to a substantial number of such employees are inadequate to supply the necessary cost of living and to maintain the workers in health.”

  • Sam Luciano
    Sam Luciano

    Here we are today - the bill failed. We are still losing.

May 30, 1937: In what would become known as the Memorial Day Massacre, police open fire on striking steelworkers, their families, and supporters who were marching to the Republic Steel plant in South Chicago to set up a picket line. The police killed ten people and pursued those fleeing the attack, wounding many more; no one was ever prosecuted.

Workers on the Empire State Building