Few foods can tell us more about life in 20th century America than the wobbling jewel of domestic achievement: the Jell-O salad.

A Social History of Jell-O Salad: The Rise and Fall of an American Icon

Few foods can tell us more about life in 20th century America than the wobbling jewel of domestic achievement: the Jell-O salad.

"Corporate would love for us to disappear, no question about that," says Moorhead Dairy Queen owner Troy DeLeon. With its seasonal hours and walk-up service windows—plus a penchant for producing menu items you won't see elsewhere—the shop has more in common with the first Dairy Queen, which opened in 1940 in Joliet, Illinois, than the sleek stone-walled Grill and Chills you're likely to see today.

The Chain Breaker: A Dairy Queen Like No Other

"Corporate would love for us to disappear, no question about that," says…

Gricia, Amatriciana, Carbonara: The Origins of Rome's Pasta Classics

What's the real story on amatriciana, gricia, carbonara, and other favorite pasta dishes?

For 200 years, American fried chicken more or less meant one thing. Sure, it was subject to all kinds of regional variations, batters, dredges, and spices, but the fundamental recipe was always the same: hack up a chicken, coat it in starch, and fry it in fat. It always had bones. But a few key technological advancements in the 20th century altered American fried chicken forever. Here's how our modern boneless bird started flapping its wings.

From Southern Tradition to Mechanical Marvel: How Fried Chicken Lost its Bones

Inspiring image chicken, delicious, food, french fries, want - Resolution - Find the image to your taste

You know astronaut ice cream? That hard, crumbly freeze-dried mystery sweet in the guise of a Neapolitan? Astronauts don't actually eat it. So what are our space explorers actually eating? It's surprisingly quite tasty.

The Dark Side of the Spoon: What Astronauts Eat in Space

Space Coffee: Astronauts Are Getting a Fancy New Espresso Machine - The Atlantic

I first drank baijiu when I was 12, at a banquet in Beijing during a family trip to China. I took a small sip and felt the liquor flame down my throat, setting my nasal passages and eyes on fire. The aftertaste was of hot trash. My body involuntarily tensed as if I'd just drank poison. How was it that this drink, so deeply woven into my parent's warmest memories and the Chinese collective unconscious, tasted foremost of kerosene and rot?

The Baijiu Riddle: Learning to Love China's Infamous Firewater

I first drank baijiu when I was 12, at a banquet in Beijing during a family trip to China. I took a small sip and felt the liquor flame down my throat, setting my nasal passages and eyes on fire. The aftertaste was of hot trash. My body involuntarily tensed as if I'd just drank poison. How was it that this drink, so deeply woven into my parent's warmest memories and the Chinese collective unconscious, tasted foremost of kerosene and rot?

Pinterest
Search