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Mata Ortiz, near the ancient ruins of Casas Grandes, Mexico, is a small town famous for it's beautiful pottery. The potters of Mata Ortiz are inspired by the art of the ancient Paquime indians who lived near Mata Ortiz years ago.

ANASAZI ANCIENT ONES NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN RITUAL SHAMAN BLESSING SPIRIT PETROGLYPH PRIMITIVE DECOR LARGE DUAL SPOUT STORAGE JUG, Ancient Pueblo Anastasi Mystic Spirit Vision Relic Gallery Style Decorative Pottery

Ancestral Pueblo (Anasazi), Black Mesa Black-on-white Kayenta area, northeastern Arizona, United States Storage Jar with Horizontal Bands of Interlocking Scrolls

Ancestral Pueblo (Anasazi), Socorro Black-on-white West-central New Mexico, United States Jar with a Shoulder Chevrons and a Body Pattern of Squared Spirals and Zigzag Squares,

Mesa Verde Style Pottery Olla

Mimbres - artist unknown. U of MN Weisman Art Museum Collection. The Mimbres, an ancient Native American people, are part of the cultural history of the American Southwest. They lived in the desert valleys of southwestern New Mexico along small rivers flowing from the surrounding mountains and in parts of Arizona and northern Mexico. For a relatively short period—from A.D. 850 to 1150—

Torivio P818 ~ "Yucca Leaf Pattern" seed jar

Massive Apache coiled basketry olla

Born at Santa Clara Pueblo around 1904, Margaret Tafoya created pottery that was incredible in its size and form, and degree of perfection. Instead of painting her work, she conceived of a direct carving method for decorating redware and blackware.

Native American Acoma Pottery Jar, late 19th Century

An Acoma jar - Marie Z. Chino, with a densely detailed pattern of circular medallions and feather-lined box devices.

Anasazi, Native American, Ceramic, Mancos Canyon, Colorado, USA, 900-1300AD

A Kayenta-style painted vessel excavated at Kinishba by Byron Cummings during the 1930s. Credit: Jannelle Weakly/Arizona State Museum - Over the years, the Kinishba ruins site was pulled apart by pot hunters and soldiers from Fort Apache seeking souvenirs. In 1892 Adolph Bandelier, a pioneering archaeologist, was the first European to write about the site, and other archeologists visited it.

Acoma Polychrome Pottery Jar, c. first quarter 20th century, decorated with a curvilinear design including hachuring, abstract feather, and foliate devices, ht. 9 1/4, dia. 10 1/2 in.

San Ildefonso Bowl,Southwest Native American Indian Pottery

Julian and Maria Martinez / one of the earliest black mirror pots. New Mexico USA

Andrews Pueblo Pottery: Native American Art including Hopi, Maria Martinez black pots, beadwork and Doug West.

Hopi seed pot

Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico, U.S.A - Polychrome Jar with Rainbow, Macaw, and Floral Motifs, 1880s - Ceramic and pigment -16.75" x 18.325" - Gallery 136

Mimbres Bowl, New Mexico, 1000-1150, 9 inches (diameter)

Zuni Polychrome Olla with Heartlines Deer c.1880 Zuni Polychrome Olla with Heartlines Deer c.1880