For medieval physicians, the mnemic apparatus of choice was what is sometimes today known as a folding almanac or a belt book. There are thought to be just 29 such almanacs that have survived to the present day. The almanacs contained detailed astrological calendars, lunar tables, diagrams of the human body and so on necessary for the practice of lunar medicine during the 15th century. They were small and strung onto a cord that attached to a physcian’s girdle or belt.

~ "Folding Almanac" Or "Belt Book". Hung From A Physcian’s Belt, The Almanacs Contained Astrological Calendars, Lunar Tables & Diagrams Of The Human Body Necessary For The Practice Of Lunar Medicine ~ Century) 29 Such Almanacs Are Thought To Have Survived

This microscope, made by Christopher Cock in London in 1665, was used by Robert Hooke of the Royal Society. Hooke is the author of “Micrographia” and was the first person to apply the word “cell” to microscopic structures.

Microscope, made by Christopher Cock in London in used by Robert Hooke of the Royal Society. Hooke is the author of 'Micrographia' and was the first person to apply the word 'cell' to microscopic structures, the National Museum Health and Medicine.

Microscope made by John Marshall in London, who signed each of his instruments individually, circa 1695

House decoration: Microscope made by John Marshall in London, who signed each of his instruments individually, circa 1695

Chest microscope formerly owned by Pope Benedict XIV, Italy, 1701-1730  The high level of decoration reflects the status of this microscope’s former owner, Pope Benedict XIV. This is an example of a chest microscope, which were popular from the mid 1700s and throughout the 1800s. The microscope folds into the chest, which protects the tube as well as making the microscope portable

Chest microscope formerly owned by Pope Benedict XIV, Italy,

18th century simple microscope and accessoriescuriousscience.com

century simple microscope and accessories. Curious Science has a wide range of period Laboratory Antiques specimens for hire as props to the tv and film industry. We have many Laboratory Antiques examples available which are not on view on our web site.

Culpepper Microscope

A good example of a late century brass Culpepper design microscope in the original mahogany case, with a selection of accessories in the drawer.

17th century ivory anatomical models

century ivory anatomical models((They used these in Asia for women who needed doctors to show on it where they had problems without disrobing in front of the doctor

This microscope was developed between 1820 and 1827 by Charles Gould, an English microscope maker, and was first described in a catalogue in 1827.

This microscope was developed between 1820 and 1827 by Charles Gould, an English microscope maker, and was first described in a catalogue in

'De Hortus Sanitatis': A rare book detailing some of the earliest European medical texts. A rare medieval book gives an insight into the bizarre medical practices used 500 years ago. The book, first printed in Mainz, Germany, in 1491, is a fusion of late medieval science and folklore. It contains detailed writings and annotated illustrations on plants, herbs, animals, and minerals. Meanwhile, detailed illustrations reveal how physicians used to study the colour of urine to make diagnoses.

'De Hortus Sanitatis': A rare book detailing some of the earliest European…

BREAST FORK, a mid eighteenth century instrument used for the removal of a diseased breast.

breast fork, mid eighteenth century This instrument was used for the removal of a diseased breast and is extremely rare

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