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    Enid A. Haupt Garden

    The Enid A. Haupt Garden is a public garden in the Smithsonian complex in Washington, D.C. Covering over four acres, it is situated between the Castle and Independence Avenue and has provided a welcomed respite for Smithsonian visitors and residents of Washington since it opened in 1987 as part of the redesigned Castle quadrangle.


    Enid A. Haupt Garden

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    The Tree Dahlia is native to the mountainous regions of Mexico and Central America and begins flowering in the late November or early December in this region. This is the first time in several years that the flowers of the Tree Dahlia in the Haupt Garden have not been damaged by frost. The stems of Dahlia imperialis can grow to more than 20 feet in height and are hollow like bamboo. Ancient Aztecs reportedly used the stems as pipes to carry drinking water. The Tree Dahlia is actually not a ...

    Smithsonian Gardens on Instagram: “The Tree Dahlia is native to the mountainous regions of Mexico and Central America and begins flowering in the late November or early…”

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    Ginkgo biloba, or the Maidenhair Tree, is the only surviving member of an ancient group of trees that existed on earth before the time of the dinosaurs. Its distinctive fan-shaped leaf turns a vibrant yellow in the fall and brings a pop of color to our Enid A. Haupt Garden. Here the fall Ginkgo leaves are pictured with Ilex verticillata berries, part of the winter interest features in the Haupt Garden.

    Smithsonian Gardens on Instagram: “Ginkgo biloba, or the Maidenhair Tree, is the only surviving member of an ancient group of trees that existed on earth before the time of…”

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    Smithsonian Gardens’ on-site weather monitoring station in the Enid A. Haupt Garden. Data collected at this station helps regulate irrigation here at the Smithsonian.

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    The giant Angel's Trumpet (Brugmansia 'Charles Grimaldi') on the west side of the Smithsonian Castle is putting on a fantastic show. Be sure to check it out before we ship it back to the greenhouses for the winter next week!

    Smithsonian Gardens on Instagram: “The giant Angel's Trumpet (Brugmansia 'Charles Grimaldi') on the west side of the Smithsonian Castle is putting on a fantastic show. Be…”

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    The newest little residents of the @SIGardens Moongate Garden enjoying a swim after hatching yesterday

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    Looking for a whiff of something wonderful? The Gardenia jasminoides blooming in our Haupt Garden smells awesome!

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    Tons of new shaded tables and chairs in the @SIGardens Haupt Garden behind the Castle! #newlunchspot

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    The newest little residents of the Smithsonian Gardens' Moongate Garden enjoying a swim after hatching yesterday

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    Learn to make your own Smithsonian-worthy hanging baskets with a DIY tutorial from our experts at the Smithsonian Gardens' Greenhouses

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    DYI Tutorial - Learn how to make Smithsonian-style hanging baskets at home.

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    Fringed Honeymoon White Tulips on the Smithsonian Parterre

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    Wishing we could pin fragrances as well! The blooming magnolias and blue hyacinths in the Haupt Garden each spring smell wonderful!

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    Saucer magnolia blooms in the Haupt Garden, April 2015

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    Though built 124 years apart, the Smithsonian Castle (1855) & Renwick Gates (1979) use stone from same Maryland quarry.

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    Architect Carlhian’s inspiration for the Moongate Garden? The Temple of Heaven in Beijing.

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    Pink granite circles & squares frame contemplative space in the Moongate Garden in the Enid A. Haupt Garden

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    Weeping cherry tree in the Smithsonian's Enid Haupt Garden, Washington, D.C. (Photo by John Gibbons)

    Washington, D.C.’s Cherry Trees are Very Good at Planning for the Future - Smithsonian Science News

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    Greg Huse, an arborist with Smithsonian Gardens, inspects the weeping cherry tree in the Smithsonian’s Moon Gate Garden in Washington, D.C. (Photo by John Gibbons)

    Washington, D.C.’s Cherry Trees are Very Good at Planning for the Future - Smithsonian Science News

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    Greg Huse, an arborist with Smithsonian Gardens, inspects the weeping cherry tree in the Smithsonian’s Moon Gate Garden in Washington, D.C. (Photo by John Gibbons)

    Washington, D.C.’s Cherry Trees are Very Good at Planning for the Future - Smithsonian Science News

    smithsonianscience.org

    Weeping cherry tree in the Smithsonian's Enid Haupt Garden, Washington, D.C. (Photo by John Gibbons)

    Washington, D.C.’s Cherry Trees are Very Good at Planning for the Future - Smithsonian Science News

    smithsonianscience.org

    The Carolina Parakeet, one of the bird sculptures currently on display in the Enid A. Haupt Garden, was distinguished by its beautiful plumage and its very long tail. Although it was initially found in vast areas of the United States, its numbers began dwindling in the 19th century. The last parakeet was sighted in 1904, and the bird was declared extinct in 1939. The sculpture is part of The Lost Bird Project, which seeks to create awareness about our fragile bird species.

    The Carolina Parakeet

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    A bee enjoying the tweedia blossoms (Tweedia caerulea) in the Enid A. Haupt Garden

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    Enid A. Haupt Garden, outside the Sackler Gallery

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    Audrey II, is that you? The giant, slightly intimidating cliff banana is on display in the Haupt Garden (and grown in our offsite greenhouses in Maryland).

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    Vote for the Enid A. Haupt Garden and help us win the Smithsonian Summer Showdown! #SIShowdown

    Smithsonian Summer Showdown: Vote for your favorite!

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