Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

Pollinator Garden

The Smithsonian Pollinator Garden is a 400 x 40 foot area that showcases the interdependency between plants and their pollinators, including bees, beetles, and butterflies. It is located on the East side of the National Museum of Natural History at 9th Street between Constitution Avenue and the National Mall in Washington, DC.
52 Pins2.56k Followers

You can help pollinators by creating a pollinator friendly habitat in your backyard, balcony, or community. Add diversity to your landscape with a beautiful tapestry of plants that thrive under the conditions in your region. BEE One in Million! Plant for Pollinators.

Instagram photo by Smithsonian Gardens • Jun 24, 2016 at 9:06pm UTC

instagram.com

Aster x frikartii ‘Monch’ is a great fall bloomer and features lovely lavender flowers. Like other members of the Asteraceae family, this aster is a great source of both pollen and nectar for bees. The honey bees out in our gardens sure seem to think so!

Smithsonian Gardens on Instagram: “Aster x frikartii ‘Monch’ is a great fall bloomer and features lovely lavender flowers. Like other members of the Asteraceae family, this…”

instagram.com

Commonly called balloon plant for its inflated seed pods, Gomphocarpus physocarpus (formerly Asclepias physocarpa) is native to southern Africa. It can be invasive in warm areas but is treated as an annual in DC. This unusual species of milkweed is a possible host for the Monarch Butterfly. Catch this weird and (we think) wonderful plant in our Butterfly Habitat Garden outside the National Museum of Natural History.

Smithsonian Gardens on Instagram: “Commonly called balloon plant for its inflated seed pods, Gomphocarpus physocarpus (formerly Asclepias physocarpa) is native to southern…”

instagram.com

Dozens of adult blue-winged wasps (Scolia dubia) feed on goldenrod nectar in the landscape outside the National Air and Space Museum. The larvae of this beneficial wasp feed on plant-damaging beetle grubs in the soil including Japanese beetles and green June beetles.

Smithsonian Gardens on Instagram: “Dozens of adult blue-winged wasps (Scolia dubia) feed on goldenrod nectar in the landscape outside the National Air and Space Museum. The…”

instagram.com

When attacked (or poked) black swallowtail caterpillars extrude bright orange horn-like organs known as osmeterium. They omit a chemical repellent that they try to smear on predators with a pungent smell (probably from all the parsley, fennel, and dill they consume as their host plant). Watch the process in slow motion (minus the smell).

Smithsonian Gardens on Instagram: “When attacked (or poked) black swallowtail caterpillars extrude bright orange horn-like organs known as osmeterium. They omit a chemical…”

instagram.com

Twitterfrom Twitter

Smithsonian Gardens on

Results from a great photo shoot w/ a #monarch caterpillar in our Butterfly Habitat Garden outside @NMNH

Smithsonian Gardens on Twitter

twitter.com

Twitterfrom Twitter

Smithsonian Gardens on

Buttonbush in the Butterfly Garden outside @NMNH is attracting lots of attention from visitors-both human and insect!

Smithsonian Gardens on Twitter

twitter.com

Twitterfrom Twitter

Smithsonian Gardens on

Oasis in the city: Creating a balanced ecosystem for #butterflies in the middle of DC http://ow.ly/OQ9QR

Smithsonian Gardens on Twitter

twitter.com

The large milkweed bugs in the National Museum of Natural History Butterfly Habitat Garden are chowing down on our milkweed seed pods.

Smithsonian Gardens (SIGardens) | Twitter

twitter.com

Smithsonian Gardensfrom Smithsonian Gardens

The Butterfly Garden: A Haven for Wild Bees

A sweat bee (Augochlorellaa) on a black-eyed Susan in the Butterfly Habitat Garden.

The Butterfly Garden: A Haven for Wild Bees

smithsoniangardens.wordpress.com

Smithsonian Gardensfrom Smithsonian Gardens

The Butterfly Garden: A Haven for Wild Bees

Bumble bee (Bombus sp) foraging in the Butterfly Habitat Garden.

The Butterfly Garden: A Haven for Wild Bees

smithsoniangardens.wordpress.com

Smithsonian Gardensfrom Smithsonian Gardens

The Butterfly Garden: A Haven for Wild Bees

A carpenter bee (Xylocopa) with full pollen baskets in the Butterfly Habitat Garden.

The Butterfly Garden: A Haven for Wild Bees

smithsoniangardens.wordpress.com

Smithsonian Gardensfrom Smithsonian Gardens

The Butterfly Garden: A Haven for Wild Bees

In major urban landscape such as Washington, D.C., a place like the Smithsonian Institution’s Butterfly Habitat Garden serves a valuable purpose as a rich and rewarding refuge, not only for butterflies, but also for bees.

The Butterfly Garden: A Haven for Wild Bees

smithsoniangardens.wordpress.com

Smithsonian Gardensfrom Smithsonian Gardens

Protecting Pollinators

Smithsonian Gardens’ Butterfly Habitat Garden outside the National Museum of Natural History - check out a list of pollinator-attracting plants on our blog.

Protecting Pollinators

smithsoniangardens.wordpress.com

Smithsonian Gardensfrom Smithsonian Gardens

Protecting Pollinators

Smithsonian Gardens’ Butterfly Habitat Garden outside the National Museum of Natural History - check out a list of pollinator-attracting plants on our blog.

Protecting Pollinators

smithsoniangardens.wordpress.com

Smithsonian Gardensfrom Smithsonian Gardens

Protecting Pollinators

We are celebrating #PollinatorWeek at Smithsonian Gardens. Bee on a Brown-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia triloba) in the Butterfly Habitat Garden

Protecting Pollinators

smithsoniangardens.wordpress.com

The caterpillar in this video will become a Black Swallowtail Butterfly. The projections from the caterpillar's head are forked glands called osmeterium. When the caterpillar believes it is in danger it will release these glands and emit a foul odor to repel predators. (Don't worry! No caterpillars were harmed in the making of this video.)

Pinned from

youtube.com