slowmography

slowmography

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The Netherlands, Rotterdam  ·  Slowmography is an interactive installation that captures the movements over a chosen timeframe of its audience in one intriguing image.
slowmography
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https://flic.kr/p/9BcT3F | pinhegg | egg pinhole camera  <a href="http://www.lomography.com/magazine/lifestyle/2011/04/23/the-pinhegg-my-journey-to-build-an-egg-pinhole-camera" rel="nofollow">The Pinhegg – My Journey To Build An Egg Pinhole Camera </a>  <a href="http://www.francescocapponi.it" rel="nofollow">www.francescocapponi.it</a>

Pinhegg, created by Francesco Capponi, is a pinhole camera crafted from an eggshell. The “camera” is only good for one shot and must be sacrificed in order to reveal the image. Learn how to build your own Pinhegg here.

DIY Ring Flash

A ring flash is such a popular and easy DIY project that I finally couldn't resist the temptation to make one myself. I'll post some detailed instructions on how to make one (like this) when I have more time, but most of you should be able to figure

DIY slit scan camera

Looking for a fun new experiment? Like those old fashioned finish photos? Then let me introduce you to the wondrous world of slit scan photography.

Old Film SLR Converted into a Slit-Scan “Photo Finish” Camera

Old Film SLR Converted into a Slit-Scan “Photo Finish” Camera

sideview - mockup

sideview - mockup

layered lasercuts

layered lasercuts

focus mechanism sideview

focus mechanism sideview

focus mechanism backview

focus mechanism backview

3D view on the main construction of the camera

3D view on the main construction of the camera

Austria. Joseph Puchberger's original slitscan camera - 1843. the Ellipsen Daguerreotype, was a swinging lens system to capture 150 degree views onto 19-24 inch long plates – keep in mind this is the era before flexible cellulose film. The following year in 1844, Friedrich von Martens, a German living in Paris, made the Megaskope camera a similar device using a swinging lens but controlled by gears and handles.

The need to immerse audiences into a landscape or a battle scene is a lot older than most of us might think. One of the greatest attempts of past centuries was the panoramic painting.