Great idea for trailing veggies. Make a basic wooden frame, staple chicken wire over it. Place the wire frame at an angle on attached legs. You then use as a cucumber trellis and plant lettuce underneath! The cucumber vines won't strangle out anything else and the lettuce grows better with partial shade!!

DIY: Cucumber Trellis

Great idea for trailing veggies. Make a basic wooden frame, staple chicken wire over it. Place the wire frame at an angle on attached legs. You then use as a cucumber trellis and plant lettuce underneath! The cucumber vines won't strangle out anything else and the lettuce grows better with partial shade!!

Purchase stair risers, add some window boxes, and you’ve got a perfect place for an herb garden. | 41 Cheap And Easy Backyard DIYs You Must Do This Summer

41 Cheap And Easy Backyard DIYs You Must Do This Summer

Purchase stair risers, add some window boxes, and you’ve got a perfect place for an herb garden. | 41 Cheap And Easy Backyard DIYs You Must Do This Summer

20 Insanely Clever Gardening Tips And Ideas

20 Insanely Clever Gardening Tips and Ideas (with pictures!)

Pleaching or plashing was common in gardens from the late Middle Ages until the 18th century.  This technique is a kind of weaving of the branches of deciduous trees or shrubs to form a living fence.  Sometimes branches woven together grow together, a natural grafting known as inosculation.  Sir Walter Scott brought the technique back to popularity in England when he described such a fence in The Fortunes of Nigel.

Pleaching or plashing was common in gardens from the late Middle Ages until the 18th century. This technique is a kind of weaving of the branches of deciduous trees or shrubs to form a living fence. Sometimes branches woven together grow together, a natural grafting known as inosculation. Sir Walter Scott brought the technique back to popularity in England when he described such a fence in The Fortunes of Nigel.

Used plastic planters instead of clay because of the weight...... Gotta make one for front porch now.

Used plastic planters instead of clay because of the weight...... Gotta make one for front porch now.

Boxwood is very easy to propagate. In the spring, take stem cuttings, 6 inches in length, and remove the lower inch of leaves. For best effect, group five to seven stems together, as pictured, to resemble an entire plant.  Plunge this group into soil that has been amended with copious quantities of peat moss or leaf mold.  Pack the soil firmly around the stems. Keep the cuttings moist, and you will have new, rooted plants in about six weeks.

Boxwood is very easy to propagate. In the spring, take stem cuttings, 6 inches in length, and remove the lower inch of leaves. For best effect, group five to seven stems together, as pictured, to resemble an entire plant. Plunge this group into soil that has been amended with copious quantities of peat moss or leaf mold. Pack the soil firmly around the stems. Keep the cuttings moist, and you will have new, rooted plants in about six weeks.

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