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Art Sound Machines Roll into German Museum A German museum dedicated to contemporary art with a focus on architecture and design,Marta Herford opened the doors of its Frank Gehry-designed building back in 2005. [[MORE]] With their current exhibition BOOSTER, conceived in collaboration with artist Nik Nowak, Marta Herford brings together art, sound, and motion in the Art Sound Machine, the general tag they have assigned to the artist-designed speakers broadcasting various tones and sounds throughout the exhibit. Some are mobile—noisy vehicles roaming around the installation and creating a total sound atmosphere. Conceptually, BOOSTER explores the many incarnations of noise in society, be it a boombox on the street or megaphones at a protest, and what these instruments of sorts contribute culturally and artistically. BOOSTER will be on view until June 1 at Marta Herford in Herford, Germany. -Kate Haveles

ARTLOG — Fish Here, Get Your Fish! [[MORE]] Just a few...

ArtPrize Winner Anila Quayyum Agha [[MORE]] While Grand Rapids, Michigan might sound like a far cry from the bustling art world, over a thousand artists infiltrate the city every fall to participate in the unique international competition ArtPrize. This independently organized event proclaims radicalism through their unabashedly open call for artists and venues – anyone over 18 can participate and any space in the district can host. They also award prizes based on a public vote and juried selections. This completely free event, lasting for 19 days, transforms downtown Grand Rapids into an arts playground where connoisseurs and novices bask in the beauty of visual creativity while participating in a larger conversation about art and why it matters. The 2014 iteration of this competition came to a close a few weeks ago with Anila Quayyum Agha winning both the Jury and Public Grand Prize Awards for her scintillating work Intersections, which wasinstalled at the Grand Rapids Art Museum. Her seemingly simple creation, a laser-cut wooden box with a light source, fills the entire gallery with intricate shadowed patterns. Similar to pioneers working in the expanded sculptural field, Agha blurs the boundaries between object and art begging the viewers to question what constitutes the artwork – the shadows or the carved box. The shadows are reminiscent of the patterning prevalent in Islamic culture. They turn the gallery space into an experiential portal to Middle Eastern cultures while the manipulated box recalls the history of embroidery, a predominantly female activity, weighted with historical connotations. Pakistani born Agha situates her practice on “the deeply entwined political relationships between gender, culture, religion, labor, and social codes.” (As articulated in her online artist statement.) Intersections manages to touch on these highly charged issues in a poetic manner that underscores the necessity for cross cultural exchange and discussion especially when dealing with poignant, controversial themes. After sweeping both the juried and public prizes Anila Quayyum Agha will be an artist to watch over the following years. I, personally, cannot wait to see her practice evolve and flourish both visually and theoretically. ArtPrize took place from September 24 – October 12 in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. In 2015, the competition will run from September 23 – October 11th. Mark your calendars and start planning your excursion. -Kirsten Nicholas Image: Agha, Intersection at the Grand Rapids Art Museum, 2014. (Images taken from Hyperallergic)

Wooden Tools Working out of their studio in Charleston, South Carolina, Michael James Moran and Celia Gibson allow their materials, namely local walnut and oak trees, to dictate their collection of beautifully crafted furniture and objects. [[MORE]] And while we are lusting after one of their incredible one-of-a-kind live oak creations, we can’t stop from admiring Gibson and Moran’s series of decorative walnut tools. A playful reversal of metal hand tools, Moran’s shovels and axes have wooden spades and heads with long cast iron handles. You can find their collection of handtools on Moran Woodworked Furniture. -Kat Herriman

Wooden Tools Working out of their studio in Charleston, South Carolina, Michael James Moran and Celia Gibson allow their materials, namely local walnut and oak trees, to dictate their collection of beautifully crafted furniture and objects. [[MORE]] And while we are lusting after one of their incredible one-of-a-kind live oak creations, we can’t stop from admiring Gibson and Moran’s series of decorative walnut tools. A playful reversal of metal hand tools, Moran’s shovels and axes have wooden spades and heads with long cast iron handles. You can find their collection of handtools on Moran Woodworked Furniture. -Kat Herriman

The Aesthetic of Brooklyn Bars Creating a successful dive bar is a finely tuned art. [[MORE]] The term, coined in the 1880s as an “illegal drinking den of ill repute,” can encapsulate everything from a desperate old-man joint to a local punk pub. Often romanticized but always unpredictable, a dive bar can be a weather vane for the community it caters to. Here are a few local favorites that are sure to be memorable if nothing else. 1. Barcade // 388 Union Ave: Packed with arcade games, cheap beer and smelly crust punks, Barcade services nerdy gamers and beer buffs alike, as they have over thirty arcade games and dozens of beers to choose from. Indulge your ten-year-old self with these classic arcade games, but remember to bring quarters! 2. Duff’s // 168 Marcy Ave: Come for $1 PBR happy hour or spin the liquor wheel for $3 to see what you get (be careful though, it could be a dog biscuit!) The underground pub is typically full of metal heads, morbid memorabilia, and a grim reaper mannequin that sits among it’s patrons. What more could you ask for? 3. Rosemary’s Greenpoint Tavern // 188 Bedford Ave: Overlaid with holiday tinsel decor, this bar features an electronic jukebox and sassy aging barmaids. Get a Budweiser cup (no not a pint or a pitcher, an actual large styrofoam cup) for $4 while you watch the game on a big screen TV. 4. The Anchored Inn // 57 Waterbury St: A nautical-themed vision of black velvet paintings, shipwreck artifacts, and cushy booths. The decor is amazing, but the drinks are overpriced and the staff not-so-friendly. 5. Gotham City Lounge // 1293 Myrtle Ave: A small comic-book tavern that is more secretive than Clark Kent’s true identity. A sparsely populated nerd haven with cheap drinks and a congenial staff. 6. The Charleston // 174 Bedford Ave: If you like free pizza (who doesn’t?) this is the dive for you. The place boasts a rock-n-roll jukebox, free daytime pizza ($1 after happy hour) and sometimes a leaky ceiling. But don’t go there on weekends, under any circumstances (don’t ask me why). 7. Lucky Dog Saloon // 303 Bedford Ave: Throw some back with your canine companions – they allow dogs here. If you don’t have one, you’re bound to meet someone who does! -Sola Agustsson

Menashe Kadishman, Suspended at Storm King, Mountainville, NY

ArtPrize Winner Anila Quayyum Agha [[MORE]] While Grand Rapids, Michigan might sound like a far cry from the bustling art world, over a thousand artists infiltrate the city every fall to participate in the unique international competition ArtPrize. This independently organized event proclaims radicalism through their unabashedly open call for artists and venues – anyone over 18 can participate and any space in the district can host. They also award prizes based on a public vote and juried selections. This completely free event, lasting for 19 days, transforms downtown Grand Rapids into an arts playground where connoisseurs and novices bask in the beauty of visual creativity while participating in a larger conversation about art and why it matters. The 2014 iteration of this competition came to a close a few weeks ago with Anila Quayyum Agha winning both the Jury and Public Grand Prize Awards for her scintillating work Intersections, which wasinstalled at the Grand Rapids Art Museum. Her seemingly simple creation, a laser-cut wooden box with a light source, fills the entire gallery with intricate shadowed patterns. Similar to pioneers working in the expanded sculptural field, Agha blurs the boundaries between object and art begging the viewers to question what constitutes the artwork – the shadows or the carved box. The shadows are reminiscent of the patterning prevalent in Islamic culture. They turn the gallery space into an experiential portal to Middle Eastern cultures while the manipulated box recalls the history of embroidery, a predominantly female activity, weighted with historical connotations. Pakistani born Agha situates her practice on “the deeply entwined political relationships between gender, culture, religion, labor, and social codes.” (As articulated in her online artist statement.) Intersections manages to touch on these highly charged issues in a poetic manner that underscores the necessity for cross cultural exchange and discussion especially when dealing with poignant, controversial themes. After sweeping both the juried and public prizes Anila Quayyum Agha will be an artist to watch over the following years. I, personally, cannot wait to see her practice evolve and flourish both visually and theoretically. ArtPrize took place from September 24 – October 12 in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. In 2015, the competition will run from September 23 – October 11th. Mark your calendars and start planning your excursion. -Kirsten Nicholas Image: Agha, Intersection at the Grand Rapids Art Museum, 2014. (Images taken from Hyperallergic)

ArtPrize Winner Anila Quayyum Agha [[MORE]] While Grand Rapids, Michigan might sound like a far cry from the bustling art world, over a thousand artists infiltrate the city every fall to participate in the unique international competition ArtPrize. This independently organized event proclaims radicalism through their unabashedly open call for artists and venues – anyone over 18 can participate and any space in the district can host. They also award prizes based on a public vote and juried selections. This completely free event, lasting for 19 days, transforms downtown Grand Rapids into an arts playground where connoisseurs and novices bask in the beauty of visual creativity while participating in a larger conversation about art and why it matters. The 2014 iteration of this competition came to a close a few weeks ago with Anila Quayyum Agha winning both the Jury and Public Grand Prize Awards for her scintillating work Intersections, which wasinstalled at the Grand Rapids Art Museum. Her seemingly simple creation, a laser-cut wooden box with a light source, fills the entire gallery with intricate shadowed patterns. Similar to pioneers working in the expanded sculptural field, Agha blurs the boundaries between object and art begging the viewers to question what constitutes the artwork – the shadows or the carved box. The shadows are reminiscent of the patterning prevalent in Islamic culture. They turn the gallery space into an experiential portal to Middle Eastern cultures while the manipulated box recalls the history of embroidery, a predominantly female activity, weighted with historical connotations. Pakistani born Agha situates her practice on “the deeply entwined political relationships between gender, culture, religion, labor, and social codes.” (As articulated in her online artist statement.) Intersections manages to touch on these highly charged issues in a poetic manner that underscores the necessity for cross cultural exchange and discussion especially when dealing with poignant, controversial themes. After sweeping both the juried and public prizes Anila Quayyum Agha will be an artist to watch over the following years. I, personally, cannot wait to see her practice evolve and flourish both visually and theoretically. ArtPrize took place from September 24 – October 12 in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. In 2015, the competition will run from September 23 – October 11th. Mark your calendars and start planning your excursion. -Kirsten Nicholas Image: Agha, Intersection at the Grand Rapids Art Museum, 2014. (Images taken from Hyperallergic)

ARTLOG

ARTLOG — Giant ‘Paper Chase’ Installation Runs Down...

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Pénétrable de Chicago [[MORE]] On view at the Art Institute of Chicago, Jesús Rafael Soto’s Pénétrable is an immersive installation created with thousands of transluscent plastic tubes.  The last presentation of this piece was in 1986, though his works in many variations have been viewed around the US and Internationally for decades. Soto began creating these interactive installation works in 1967, once stating with clear reference to his Pénétrables that “We are in the world like fish in water”.     Experiencing Soto’s Pénétrable truly involves your entire body as its interactive nature takes over the minute it comes into view.  Visitors of the Art Institute of Chicago can take part in this interactive exhibition first hand from now until March 8, 2015. Born in Venezuela in the 1920s, Soto worked mostly on abstract geometric paintings among other things until the development of his Pénétrables, of which he made about 30 in his lifetime.  In an effort to promote his work as well as increase involvement in the arts for the Venezuelan population, the Jesús Soto Museum of Modern Art was opened in Ciudad Bolivar, Venezuela.  Open to the public, the museum features Soto’s work dating from 1950 until his death in 2005 For more information about Soto click — HERE For more information about the Chicago exhibition click — HERE  For more information about the Soto Museum of Modern Art click — HERE -Becca Gore

Paper Pulp Chandeliers Known for her willingness to experiment with materials, British designer Pia Wustenberg is at it again with a line of paper chandeliers. [[MORE]] The collection started when Wustenberg was invited to do an artist residency in Ahmedabad, India and worked alongside local papermakers at the Khalamkush Paper Factory. Inspired by the traditional techniques employed by the artisans she met, Wustenberg decided to launch a collaboration that would highlight the deliciously organic finish of their handmade papers. The resulting collection is a series of simple hanging, paper-pulp lamps reminiscent of floral blooms. Decorated with a saturated ink rim, each funnel-shaped lamp gives off a soft glow that showcases the paper’s fibrous and delicate nature. Organic and contemporary, the lamps are a sterling example of a designer connecting traditional techniques with modern forms. The Paper Production Lamps are available through Wustenberg’s online shop, price upon request. -Kat Herriman

Luigi Ghirri

Luigi Ghirri


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