anabel stotts
anabel stotts
anabel stotts

anabel stotts

Jil Sander by David Sims

SIR DAVID WILKIE The Blind Fiddler 1806 Oil on mahogany support: 578 x 794 mm painting

A David Bromstad kitchen. Swoooooon

Moonrise, Chilmark, Massachusetts 2001 by David Fokos

Who would have thought that ribbon and plastic eggs would dress up an easter table so well

From camisoles to corsets, basques to boudoir caps and girdles to garters, Underwear: Fashion in Detail gets up close and personal with some of the most intimate items in the V&A.; Lynn traces the evolution of underwear, drawing on 120 objects that include rare examples dating from the sixteenth century, the exaggerated shapes of eighteenth-century court dress, Dior’s curvaceous ‘New Look’ and contemporary lingerie by Agent Provocateur and Rigby and Peller. Beautiful new photography shows close-up details of these fascinating garments, while intricate line drawings reveal their masterly construction. The book also highlights the work of designers such as Vionnet and Westwood who have taken influence from underwear for their own outer wear creations. Eleri Lynn is a Fashion Curator at the V&A.; Previously she was the Assistant Curator of the V&A;’s major exhibition The Golden Age of Couture (V&A; 2007).

I love this skirt! I am hoping I can wear it for the rest of my pregnancy, but it is a fabulous skirt for anyone who likes a comfy skirt. The top can be rolled up too, or you can wear it as a dress! Totally worth the money.

Several people have asked me how to make my Picnic Dress. It’s a bit too complicated for the step by step instruction on how to draft a pattern I gave for the draped t-shirt, but I hope this will be enough detail for anyone who is familiar with how dresses are made. You will need 4 yards of 45″ fabric and an 18″ zipper. These are the pieces of the pattern. Mark out the measurements listed and the distances between them. For example, on the waistband measure out the distance between your underbust/ribcage and your waist, then measure half your ribcage measurement at one side and half your waist measurement at the other. Then draw out the rest of the shape so it looks more or less like the pieces in the picture. If you aren’t used to making your own patterns it might be helpful to have a pattern for another dress to refer to, particularly for the sleeves. If you’re not used to making your own sleeves, trace both the arm hole and the top of the sleeve off a pattern you’ve used before and like. It’s tricky to get these curves right, and hard to move your arms if you get them wrong. I use gathered sleeves on this dress, which are a bit more forgiving. To change a regular set in sleeve to a gathered sleeve, simply make the top of the sleeve a bit larger without changing the arm hole. You will gather this extra, bringing the edge of the sleeve back to its original size. To make the curve of the skirt even, use your tape measure like an enormous protractor. Pick a spot along the edge of the fabric to be the center of the skirt and draw a half circle by measuring a set distance (say 24 inches) from that point in every direction. This can go very quickly if you get someone else to hold the end of the tape measure in the middle. Make a smaller half circle around the same point for the waistline. The size of this inner circle will depend on your size, but should be something on the order of 5 inches. To gather the top, mark out a distance ¾ of the difference between bust and underbust measurement on one side. Stitch along the edge of the fabric between these marks. Tie the threads together at one end. Pull slowly on one thread at the other end, gathering the fabric as you pull. When the gathered section is ⅓ of the length it began, tie the ends together. Repeat on the other side. After gathering both the lining and the top layer of the bodice, sew them together along the neckline. Turn right side out and press. Even out the gathers and make sure none of the edge bits are folded in, then sew both pieces of the bodice to the waist band, being careful with the gathered sections. Sew the edge of the facing to the neckline on each back piece. Turn and press. Turn in the edge of the facing and sew this edge to the back. Sew the front and back together at the shoulders. Gather the center of each sleeve. Sew the sleeves into the armholes. Baste the ties to the waist band, then sew the front and back together along the side. The waistband will be sewn into this seam. Sew up the underside of the sleeve. Turn under the edge of the sleeve and sew it down. Sew in the pockets if you’re including them (for more detailed directions, see here). Sew up the sides (but not the back) of the skirt, and sew the skirt to the top. Put in the zipper, then sew up the back of the skirt. Turn under ½ inch all along the bottom of the skirt, then another 2 ½ inches. Hem along this edge, taking the smallest stitches you can out of the skirt. If there’s anything you’d like to know that I’ve skipped or explained badly, please ask about it!

It's a clich‚ to say that a good memoir reads like a well-crafted work of fiction, but Kimmel's smooth, impeccably humorous prose evokes her childhood as vividly as any novel. Born in 1965, she grew up in Mooreland, Ind., a place that by some "mysterious and powerful mathematical principle" perpetually retains a population of 300, a place where there's no point learning the street names because it's just as easy to say, "We live at the four-way stop sign." Hers is less a formal autobiography than a collection of vignettes comprising the things a small child would remember: sick birds, a new bike, reading comics at the drugstore, the mean old lady down the street. The truths of childhood are rendered in lush yet simple prose; here's Zippy describing a friend who hates wearing girls' clothes: "Julie in a dress was like the rest of us in quicksand." Over and over, we encounter pearls of third-grade wisdom revealed in a child's assured voice: "There are a finite number of times one can safely climb the same tree in a single day"; or, regarding Jesus, "Everyone around me was flat-out in love with him, and who wouldn't be? He was good with animals, he loved his mother, and he wasn't afraid of blind people." (Mar.)Forecast: Dreamy and comforting, spiced with flashes of wit, this book seems a natural for readers of the Oprah school of women's fiction (e.g., Elizabeth Berg, Janet Fitch). The startling baby photograph on the cover should catch browsers' eyes