Vietnam’s national dress, the ao dai (literally “long shirt”; pronounced “ow zai” in the north, “ow yai” in the south) consists of two elements: a long tunic with a close-fitting bodice, mandarin collar, raglan sleeves, and side slits that create front and back panels from the waist down; and wide-legged pants, often cut on the bias. While in the past both men and women wore ao dai, in the twenty-first century it is almost exclusively a women’s garment.

Vietnam’s national dress, the ao dai (literally “long shirt”; pronounced “ow zai” in the north, “ow yai” in the south) consists of two elements: a long tunic with a close-fitting bodice, mandarin collar, raglan sleeves, and side slits that create front and back panels from the waist down; and wide-legged pants, often cut on the bias. While in the past both men and women wore ao dai, in the twenty-first century it is almost exclusively a women’s garment.

Little girl at the floating village at the Tonle Sap lake near Siem Reap, Cambodia. June 2008.

Little girl at the floating village at the Tonle Sap lake near Siem Reap, Cambodia. June 2008.

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