After parcel post service was introduced in 1913, at least two children were sent by the service. With stamps attached to their clothing, the children rode with railway and city carriers to their destination. The Postmaster General quickly issued a regulation forbidding the sending of children in the mail after hearing of those examples.

After parcel post service was introduced in 1913, at least two children were sent by the service. With stamps attached to their clothing, the children rode with railway and city carriers to their destination. The Postmaster General quickly issued a regulation forbidding the sending of children in the mail after hearing of those examples.

Jim Thorpe. Notice the different socks? Somebody stole his shoes before his race. All he could find were two shoes of different sizes discarded in the trash can. One was too big so he wore extra socks. He ran his race like this, and got an Olympic gold medal, and set a world record. He was treated this way because he was a Native American

Jim Thorpe. Notice the different socks? Somebody stole his shoes before his race. All he could find were two shoes of different sizes discarded in the trash can. One was too big so he wore extra socks. He ran his race like this, and got an Olympic gold medal, and set a world record. He was treated this way because he was a Native American

Mata Hari, circa 1907. On July 25, 1917, the Paris dancer was sentenced to death for spying for Germany during World War I. Her exotic and provocative routines brought her fame across Europe, and her lovers included military and political figures from France and Germany. (Gamma-Keystone/Getty)

Mata Hari, circa 1907. On July 25, 1917, the Paris dancer was sentenced to death for spying for Germany during World War I. Her exotic and provocative routines brought her fame across Europe, and her lovers included military and political figures from France and Germany. (Gamma-Keystone/Getty)

Jane Bolin was the first black woman judge in the United States. Born April 11, 1908 in Poughkeepsie, New York, Bolin always knew she wanted to be a lawyer. Her father, Gaius Bolin, the first African American graduate of Williams College, practiced law in Poughkeepsie. Bolin graduated from Wellesley College in 1928, and received her law degree from Yale University School of Law in 1931.

Jane Bolin was the first black woman judge in the United States. Born April 11, 1908 in Poughkeepsie, New York, Bolin always knew she wanted to be a lawyer. Her father, Gaius Bolin, the first African American graduate of Williams College, practiced law in Poughkeepsie. Bolin graduated from Wellesley College in 1928, and received her law degree from Yale University School of Law in 1931.

Pioneer: Victoria Claflin Woodhull, born in 1838, married at age fifteen to an alcoholic and womanizer. She became the first woman to establish a brokerage firm on Wall Street and played an active role in the woman's suffrage movement. She became the first woman to run for President of the United States in 1872. Her name is largely lost in history. Few recognize her name and accomplishments.

Pioneer: Victoria Claflin Woodhull, born in 1838, married at age fifteen to an alcoholic and womanizer. She became the first woman to establish a brokerage firm on Wall Street and played an active role in the woman's suffrage movement. She became the first woman to run for President of the United States in 1872. Her name is largely lost in history. Few recognize her name and accomplishments.

A Moor from Aswan, Egypt, 1910. Few today talk about the remnants of original people of Egypt, who lived there for thousands of years. Yes, they are still there, although the invading Arabs and their descendants who currently populate the country have tried to take that identity for themself, the seeds of the Pharaohs are still alive. Interestingly, an Arab lady (writer) was threatened and harassed for trying to shed light on the original people of Egypt.

A Moor from Aswan, Egypt, 1910. Few today talk about the remnants of original people of Egypt, who lived there for thousands of years. Yes, they are still there, although the invading Arabs and their descendants who currently populate the country have tried to take that identity for themself, the seeds of the Pharaohs are still alive. Interestingly, an Arab lady (writer) was threatened and harassed for trying to shed light on the original people of Egypt.

Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson was a 24 year old widow raising a daughter when she decided to attend the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. She graduated with honors in 1891 and accepted a position as the resident physician at the Tuskegee Institute. Before she began her job, Halle needed to pass the Alabama Medical Board exam, an unusually difficult multi-day test. When she passed the exam, Halle became the first female physician of any race licensed by the state of Alabama.

Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson was a 24 year old widow raising a daughter when she decided to attend the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. She graduated with honors in 1891 and accepted a position as the resident physician at the Tuskegee Institute. Before she began her job, Halle needed to pass the Alabama Medical Board exam, an unusually difficult multi-day test. When she passed the exam, Halle became the first female physician of any race licensed by the state of Alabama.

Though Thomas Edison is recognized as the inventor of the light bulb, African-American inventor Lewis Latimer played an important role in its development. In 1881, Latimer patented a method for making carbon filaments, allowing light bulbs to burn for hours instead of minutes. Latimer also drafted the drawings that helped Alexander Graham Bell receive a patent for the telephone.

Though Thomas Edison is recognized as the inventor of the light bulb, African-American inventor Lewis Latimer played an important role in its development. In 1881, Latimer patented a method for making carbon filaments, allowing light bulbs to burn for hours instead of minutes. Latimer also drafted the drawings that helped Alexander Graham Bell receive a patent for the telephone.

Gabrielle Douglas- Gabby is the first woman of color of any nationality & the first African-American gymnast in Olympic history to become the Individual All-Around Champion.

Twelve for 12

Gabrielle Douglas- Gabby is the first woman of color of any nationality & the first African-American gymnast in Olympic history to become the Individual All-Around Champion.

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