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Hammer at Home: Art from the Everyday

Collection by Hammer Museum

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Create artwork using materials you can find around your home.

Hammer Museum
Like Nathaniel Mary Quinn (artwork on the right), you’re going to make a person out of a bunch of different people! First, draw a circle on your paper- that’s your head. Then, look through your magazine, and find pictures where you can see all the things on a person’s face - eyes, nose, ears, mouth, hair, etc. Here’s the catch: each part of the face has to come from a different picture. When you’ve cut out your features, arrange them on your head and glue them down to create your face. Collage Techniques, Make A Person, Find Picture, Ears, Magazine, Play, Portrait, Create, Paper

Practice collage techniques to create a portrait

Like Nathaniel Mary Quinn (artwork on the right), you’re going to make a person out of a bunch of different people! First, draw a circle on your paper- that’s your head. Then, look through your magazine, and find pictures where you can see all the things on a person’s face - eyes, nose, ears, mouth, hair, etc. Here’s the catch: each part of the face has to come from a different picture. When you’ve cut out your features, arrange them on your head and glue them down to create your face.

You’ll need a plain piece of white paper and a pencil with an eraser. Use the flat edge of your pencil to fill in the whole sheet of paper. Vija Clemens, inspired by nature, drew spider webs and stars using backgrounds like these. To create a spider web, use your eraser to first draw a circle and then add lines through the circle that all cross in the middle. Now draw lines, curved or straight, across the triangle-like shapes. To add stars, use your eraser to make circles of different sizes. Vija Celmins, Largest Desert, Travel Fund, Big Sea, Spider Webs, Museum Of Modern Art, White Paper, Circles, Fill

Draw with your eraser in the style of Vija Clemens

You’ll need a plain piece of white paper and a pencil with an eraser. Use the flat edge of your pencil to fill in the whole sheet of paper. Vija Clemens, inspired by nature, drew spider webs and stars using backgrounds like these. To create a spider web, use your eraser to first draw a circle and then add lines through the circle that all cross in the middle. Now draw lines, curved or straight, across the triangle-like shapes. To add stars, use your eraser to make circles of different sizes.

Dorothy Woodhead Brown took inspiration from the natural world in her work. You can take that inspiration one step further and use nature itself to create your own work of art! On a walk with a grown up, collect some leaves. Set up a few colors of paint, a paint brush, and some paper. Brush a thin layer of paint onto the side of the leaf with the raised ridges. While the paint is still wet gently press the leaf flat on your paper. When you lift it up there will be a print of the leaf’s… Museum Collection, Tropical Leaves, Paint Brushes, Natural World, Create Your Own, Shapes, Play, Brown, Colors

Paint with leaves inspired by Dorothy Woodhead Brown

Dorothy Woodhead Brown took inspiration from the natural world in her work. You can take that inspiration one step further and use nature itself to create your own work of art! On a walk with a grown up, collect some leaves. Set up a few colors of paint, a paint brush, and some paper. Brush a thin layer of paint onto the side of the leaf with the raised ridges. While the paint is still wet gently press the leaf flat on your paper. When you lift it up there will be a print of the leaf’s…

Stencils help artists create uniform images. Victor Hugo often used stencils for drawings of things in nature. You’ll need a plain piece of paper, scissors, markers or colored pencils, and cardstock or an index card. Think of something in the natural world that has a simple outline, like a mountain. Draw its outline on cardstock or an index card, then cut it out. Now place your cardstock with the image removed on your plain piece of paper. Re-use the stencil as often as you’d like and add… The Drawing Center, Black Crayon, White Gouache, Museum Exhibition, Drawing Practice, Art Institute Of Chicago, Victor Hugo, Art Images, Scissors

Craft your own stencil like Victor Hugo

Stencils help artists create uniform images. Victor Hugo often used stencils for drawings of things in nature. You’ll need a plain piece of paper, scissors, markers or colored pencils, and cardstock or an index card. Think of something in the natural world that has a simple outline, like a mountain. Draw its outline on cardstock or an index card, then cut it out. Now place your cardstock with the image removed on your plain piece of paper. Re-use the stencil as often as you’d like and add…

John Baldessari did a series of drawings of an ear, all from memory. He noticed his drawings were a little bit different each time as he remembered different details. Grab a piece of paper and a pencil. Now choose a body part to draw. It has to be one you couldn’t see by standing in front of a mirror (for example your ear, elbow, or the bottom of your foot). Now draw as many versions of that body part as you want from memory. When you’re done compare your drawings and see what changed each… John Baldessari, Museum Collection, Body Parts, Pencil, Ear, Memories, Mirror, Drawings, Artist

Draw body parts from memory like artist John Baldessari

John Baldessari did a series of drawings of an ear, all from memory. He noticed his drawings were a little bit different each time as he remembered different details. Grab a piece of paper and a pencil. Now choose a body part to draw. It has to be one you couldn’t see by standing in front of a mirror (for example your ear, elbow, or the bottom of your foot). Now draw as many versions of that body part as you want from memory. When you’re done compare your drawings and see what changed each…

Corita Kent made political screen-prints inspired by the pop-art movement and bright neon signs on the streets of Los Angeles. This one reads, “I should like to be able to love my country and still love justice.” Using any materials you would like, create your own slogan using the format “I should like to be able to ____ and still love ____” or come up with your own message entirely! Pop Art Movement, Slogan, Create Your Own, Neon Signs, Bright, Messages, Thoughts, Inspired, Country

Express your thoughts with a poster inspired by Corita Kent

Corita Kent made political screen-prints inspired by the pop-art movement and bright neon signs on the streets of Los Angeles. This one reads, “I should like to be able to love my country and still love justice.” Using any materials you would like, create your own slogan using the format “I should like to be able to ____ and still love ____” or come up with your own message entirely!

Maren Hassinger uses wire rope in many of her sculptures. This material can be made to look like things you’d find in nature, like tree branches or vines. Go outside and find a tree branch or other element of nature that inspires you, just as the river inspired Maren Hassinger. Find an item in your house that you can bend into a sculpture—such as a wire hanger, pipecleaner, or wired ribbon. Sculpt your chosen material into the form of the item from nature that you found. Elements Of Nature, Wire Hangers, Natural Forms, Wired Ribbon, Tree Branches, Vines, Sculptures, Inspired, Create

Create a sculpture inspired by natural forms like Maren Hassinger

Maren Hassinger uses wire rope in many of her sculptures. This material can be made to look like things you’d find in nature, like tree branches or vines. Go outside and find a tree branch or other element of nature that inspires you, just as the river inspired Maren Hassinger. Find an item in your house that you can bend into a sculpture—such as a wire hanger, pipecleaner, or wired ribbon. Sculpt your chosen material into the form of the item from nature that you found.

Have you ever used an object to tell a joke? Jimmie Durham created sculptures like Coyote / Trickster out of objects he found that he thought were humorous. Look around your house and collect 5-6 objects you think would be funny if they were combined into one sculpture, like Jimmie Durham’s work. Arrange them as best you can in a vertical fashion, maybe using furniture to help them stand up. Take a photo when your sculpture is complete! Durham, How To Take Photos, Sculptures, Objects, Create, Funny, Artist, Artwork, House

Create a found object sculpture like artist Jimmie Durham

Have you ever used an object to tell a joke? Jimmie Durham created sculptures like Coyote / Trickster out of objects he found that he thought were humorous. Look around your house and collect 5-6 objects you think would be funny if they were combined into one sculpture, like Jimmie Durham’s work. Arrange them as best you can in a vertical fashion, maybe using furniture to help them stand up. Take a photo when your sculpture is complete!

For this project you will need: 4 cups flour, 1 ½ cups salt, 2 cups water, mixing bowl, and acrylic paint or washable markers. Mix flour and salt in a bowl. Gradually add water while kneading and mixing dough. When the mixture feels like playdough, it’s ready. Sculpt it into an animal of your choice, like the alligator in Natalie Djurberg’s installation. Wait two days for the sculpture to dry and become solid. Once it’s solid, use paint or markers to add color. Museum Exhibition, Salt Dough, Project Yourself, Markers, Sculpting, Cups, Feels, Presents, Creatures

Make clay to sculpt some creatures like Nathalie Djurberg

For this project you will need: 4 cups flour, 1 ½ cups salt, 2 cups water, mixing bowl, and acrylic paint or washable markers. Mix flour and salt in a bowl. Gradually add water while kneading and mixing dough. When the mixture feels like playdough, it’s ready. Sculpt it into an animal of your choice, like the alligator in Natalie Djurberg’s installation. Wait two days for the sculpture to dry and become solid. Once it’s solid, use paint or markers to add color.

"City 000" by Mike Kelley (left) was inspired by the planet Krypton from Superman comic books. What do you think an alien city might look like? Draw your ideas on scratch paper. Then collect recyclable material from around your home to use to create a model of this city. Use a piece of cardboard for your base and tape or glue to hold everything together. Paper towel rolls make great skyscrapers and takeout containers can be spaceships! Use different colored paper or markers to add color. Superman Comic Books, Like Mike, Paper Towel Rolls, Draw Your, Skyscrapers, Colored Paper, Spaceships, Markers, Planets

Design an alien city like Mike Kelley

"City 000" by Mike Kelley (left) was inspired by the planet Krypton from Superman comic books. What do you think an alien city might look like? Draw your ideas on scratch paper. Then collect recyclable material from around your home to use to create a model of this city. Use a piece of cardboard for your base and tape or glue to hold everything together. Paper towel rolls make great skyscrapers and takeout containers can be spaceships! Use different colored paper or markers to add color.

In this watercolor (bottom), the artist paints a moonlit coastline. What time of the year do you think this picture represents? What would you add to indicate a particular season? Inspired by Otto-Knapp’s painting, create a landscape based on your favorite season. First, print out the painting and trace it on blank paper. On your tracing, add colors, plants, people, or animals to stage a seasonal landscape. Use different colored pencils, markers, or paints to change the season! Museum Collection, Time Of The Year, Colored Pencils, Markers, Your Favorite, Stage, Moon, Watercolor, Seasons

Make a seasonal landscape with Silke Otto-Knapp’s "Seascape (With Moon)"

In this watercolor (bottom), the artist paints a moonlit coastline. What time of the year do you think this picture represents? What would you add to indicate a particular season? Inspired by Otto-Knapp’s painting, create a landscape based on your favorite season. First, print out the painting and trace it on blank paper. On your tracing, add colors, plants, people, or animals to stage a seasonal landscape. Use different colored pencils, markers, or paints to change the season!

Artist David Smith made sculptures by welding together stainless steel rectangles and cylinders (left). Today you’re going to practice your building skills like Smith. Collect empty paper towel rolls, toilet paper rolls and other pieces of cardboard from around your home. Wrap each piece in aluminum paper. Play around with different arrangements of your cardboard pieces to construct your sculpture, then secure your pieces with tape. If you can, display your work outside! Ucla Alumni, Ucla Campus, David Smith, Printable Maps, Alexander Calder, Abstract Words, Barbara Hepworth, Henry Moore, Outdoor Sculpture

Build a sculpture like artist David Smith

Artist David Smith made sculptures by welding together stainless steel rectangles and cylinders (left). Today you’re going to practice your building skills like Smith. Collect empty paper towel rolls, toilet paper rolls and other pieces of cardboard from around your home. Wrap each piece in aluminum paper. Play around with different arrangements of your cardboard pieces to construct your sculpture, then secure your pieces with tape. If you can, display your work outside!

Like Nathaniel Mary Quinn (artwork on the right), you’re going to make a person out of a bunch of different people! First, draw a circle on your paper- that’s your head. Then, look through your magazine, and find pictures where you can see all the things on a person’s face - eyes, nose, ears, mouth, hair, etc. Here’s the catch: each part of the face has to come from a different picture. When you’ve cut out your features, arrange them on your head and glue them down to create your face. Collage Techniques, Make A Person, Find Picture, Ears, Magazine, Play, Portrait, Create, Paper

Practice collage techniques to create a portrait

Like Nathaniel Mary Quinn (artwork on the right), you’re going to make a person out of a bunch of different people! First, draw a circle on your paper- that’s your head. Then, look through your magazine, and find pictures where you can see all the things on a person’s face - eyes, nose, ears, mouth, hair, etc. Here’s the catch: each part of the face has to come from a different picture. When you’ve cut out your features, arrange them on your head and glue them down to create your face.

Delia Cancela uses the symbol of a broken heart to express sadness, but hearts are more often used to express love. What are some things you love to do? Let’s create a work about things that bring you joy. Start by painting or drawing your name on the cardboard. Use really big, colorful letters. Then poke five small holes into the bottom of the cardboard and tie a piece of string in each. At the bottom of each piece of string, attach an image or object that brings you joy. Mending A Broken Heart, Sadness, Hearts, Museum, Symbols, Joy, Letters, Colorful, Create

Mend a broken heart with art about things you love

Delia Cancela uses the symbol of a broken heart to express sadness, but hearts are more often used to express love. What are some things you love to do? Let’s create a work about things that bring you joy. Start by painting or drawing your name on the cardboard. Use really big, colorful letters. Then poke five small holes into the bottom of the cardboard and tie a piece of string in each. At the bottom of each piece of string, attach an image or object that brings you joy.

Many of Aubrey Schwartz’s prints feature close-ups of natural elements, like flowers or grasses. What details do you notice in your environment? Examples could include trees, rocks, or house plants. Choose a natural object and make a viewfinder to focus on a detail. To make a viewfinder, grab a sheet of paper and cut a small hole in the center. Stand away from your chosen object, hold up the viewfinder, and look through the hole with one eye closed. On another paper, draw the details you… Grasses, House Plants, Rocks, Environment, Trees, Museum, Eye, Detail, Drawings

Draw a detail of a natural object using a viewfinder based on Aubrey Schwartz’s prints

Many of Aubrey Schwartz’s prints feature close-ups of natural elements, like flowers or grasses. What details do you notice in your environment? Examples could include trees, rocks, or house plants. Choose a natural object and make a viewfinder to focus on a detail. To make a viewfinder, grab a sheet of paper and cut a small hole in the center. Stand away from your chosen object, hold up the viewfinder, and look through the hole with one eye closed. On another paper, draw the details you…

Artist James Welling worked with his brother, a musician, on this series capturing images of farms in the New York area (top). Go outside with a friend or family member and do a nature walk, noticing the different types of plants and animals around you. As you walk, gather flowers or plants that catch your eye. When you’re back home draw different images that reflect how you felt as you were doing your nature walk. Then, attach the flowers and plants you collected to different parts of the… New Paltz Ny, Museum Collection, Types Of Plants, Walking In Nature, Go Outside, Natural World, Farms, Brother, Bee

Used mixed media to depict the natural world like artist James Welling

Artist James Welling worked with his brother, a musician, on this series capturing images of farms in the New York area (top). Go outside with a friend or family member and do a nature walk, noticing the different types of plants and animals around you. As you walk, gather flowers or plants that catch your eye. When you’re back home draw different images that reflect how you felt as you were doing your nature walk. Then, attach the flowers and plants you collected to different parts of the…