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The Supreme Court on Monday upheld the police practice of taking DNA samples from people who have been arrested but not convicted of a crime, ruling that it amounts to the 21st century version of fingerprinting. Twenty-eight states and the federal government take DNA swabs from people under arrest before they can be tried.

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President Obama has defended the NSA surveillance program saying, “you can’t have 100% security” and still have “100% privacy.” Do you agree? http://s.thelaw.tv/12iUMCW

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A California state senator, Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco), said he intends to introduce a bill which would prohibit 3D-printers from crafting plastic guns. Yee says he wants regulation that would track 3D printers and figure out what people are doing with them.

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Las Vegas-based UltimatePoker.com launched the first legal, real-money poker website in the United States. Online gamblers around the world currently wager an estimated $35 billion each year, according to the American Gaming Association.

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The Internet is filled with illegitimate, professional-looking pharmaceutical sites that run 24-hour call centers and lure customers with spam emails. So, Pfizer, the maker of Viagra, has decided to sell their erectile-dysfunction medication online to fight the fraudulent websites.

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Lawyers and attorneys are using Urban Dictionary to understand the meaning of such slang as "iron" (a handgun), "jack" (to steal), and "catfishing"(the phenomenon of Internet predators that fabricate online identities).

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If you’re one of those fans making a wager through an office pool, you might want to check with your HR department before you place your bets. While it’s extremely unlikely that you could run into any legal problems for small office pools, your boss might still take issue.

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U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts has been hit by credit card fraud. The Washington Post reports Roberts usually uses a credit card to buy his morning coffee at his local Starbucks in suburban Maryland. But last Tuesday, he had to pay in cash. Seems someone had gotten his credit-card numbers, he told the cashier, and he was obliged to cancel the card.

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Montana State Sen. Larry Jent introduced legislation in Montana that would make it legal to recover roadkill – be it elk, deer, antelope or moose – for food.

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Robert Ginsberg, a Manhattan negligence lawyer, is upset that after taking his suit to be tailored, he received a mismatched one with pants two sizes too big. His efforts to persuade Brooks Brothers to make an exchange failed, and now he’s headed for court to resolve the matter.

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