Social Movements & Change

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"Diets are a cure that don't work for a disease that doesn't exit" was one of the slogans said by the first fat activism movements in the 60s. This is not new information. ~ @SofieHagen
~ @RBReich

Social Mvmts: The Tweets

16 Pins
With ‘Stop the Steal’ demonstrations, there has already been disproportionate engagement by militia groups relative to other protests: militia groups have participated in 18% of all ‘Stop the Steal’ demonstrations, while they have engaged in less than 1% of all other demonstrations Source: Kishi, Roudabeh, Hampton Stall, and Sam Jones. 2020. "The Future of 'Stop the Steal': Post-Election Trajectories for Right-Wing Mobilization in the US." ACLED

Social Mvmts: The Charts

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"These Kids Should Be in School Instead of Protesting," say people so tantalizingly close to getting the point.  ~ The Onion, on Greta Thunberg's climate activism
Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old leader of a global protest against inaction on climate change, marched at a rally, September 20, 2019. Around the world, millions of other people joined her.  Photo credit: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez / AP — in New York, New York.
Protesters march during a Fridays for Future rally against climate change, September 20, 2019.  Photo credit: Michele Spatari / AFP — in Johannesburg.

Social Mvmts: The Environmental Movement

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"Include Disabled People in Activism," The 17-year-old behind @elliewheels, Ellie uses her Instagram account to bring visibility to disability rights, women's rights, and LGBTQ rights, c. March 2018.  Photo credit: Blair B. Brown
"Disabled Women Matter" "They tried to bury us. They didn't know we were seeds," at the Women's March on Washington, January 21, 2017.  Photo credit: @Kristin_Duquette, on Instagram — in Washington, District of Columbia.
"The Revolution Is Wheelchair Accessible," The Women's March on Washington, January 21, 2017.

Social Mvmts: Disability Rights Movement

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A doctored animation of Parkland shooting survivor Emma Gonzalez ripping the US Constitution in two went viral on social media.  "#EmmaGonzalez Proudly shredding The Constitution. Horrifying to every educated American."  ~ @LindaCo03364065  [Image description: The left frame is an original image of Emma Gonzalez tearing up a bullseye used for target practice. The right frame is a Photoshopped image of her tearing up the US Constitution.]
"I have schizophrenia, and I am NOT a monster! Stop blaming mental health for a gun problem," March 2018.  Photo credit: ithelpstodream, on Tumblr
"Prayers and thoughts don't save lives," Students from Montgomery Blair High School march down Colesville Road in support of gun-reform legislation, February 21, 2018.  Photo credit: Win McNamee / Getty — in Silver Spring, Maryland.

Social Mvmts: The Gun Control Movement

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Anti-government protests in Algiers, Algeria, with a banner reading “Government go away – students take over,” April 2019. President Abdelaziz Bouteflika bowed to pressure from the military and weeks of popular protests by stepping down from power. The protestors are continuing to call for the removal and prosecution of what they see as corrupt and ineffective elites who have collectively ruled Algeria since independence from France in 1962.  Photo credit: Ramzi Boudina — in Algiers, Algeria.
Crowds celebrate in Algiers as Algeria becomes an independent state. After a nearly eight-year war against colonial French rule in the country, Algeria’s independence was officially declared on July 5th, 1962.  Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this photo?
Algiers, Algeria, the Clos Salembier district, 1960 Photo credit: Nicolas Tikhomiroff

Social Mvmts: Algerian Independence Movement

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Summer volunteer carpenter Jim Boebel and a local resident post a shotgun watch at the community center against a fire-bomb threat by local whites. Threats were common that summer and local men took turns guarding the community every night, 1964.  Photo credit: Matt Herron — at Mississippi.
Freedom Summer Murders  On June 21, 1964, voting rights activists James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner, who had come here to investigate the burning of Mt. Zion Church, wer murdered. Victims of a Klan conspiracy, their deaths provoked national outrage and led to the first successful federal prosecution of a civil rights case in Mississippi.
Students taking part in the Freedom Summer campaign join hands and sing as they prepare to leave Ohio for Mississippi in 1964. Their work to register blacks to vote relied on the help of Mississippians who sheltered them, raised money and supported them in other ways, often at risk to their own safety.  Photo credit: Ted Polumbaum / Newseum Collection..

Social Mvmts: Freedom Summer (1964)

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On June 11, 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested for trespassing at the Monson Motor Lodge after being asked to leave from its segregated restaurant. The following week, on June 18, civil rights demonstrators jumped into the Lodge's segregated pool in protest, and the owner of the lodge, Jimmy Brock, responded by dumping muriatic acid into the pool, shouting, "I'm cleaning the pool!" The acid was too diluted to pose any real threat...Photo credit: AP / JK
On June 11, 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested for trespassing at the Monson Motor Lodge after being asked to leave from its segregated restaurant. The following week, on June 18, civil rights demonstrators jumped into the Lodge's segregated pool in protest, and the owner of the lodge, Jimmy Brock, responded by pouring muriatic acid into the pool. The acid was too diluted to pose any real threat, but many of the protesters were eventually arrested...Photo credit: AP
On June 11, 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested for trespassing at the Monson Motor Lodge after being asked to leave from its segregated restaurant. The following week, on June 18, civil rights demonstrators jumped into the Lodge's segregated pool in protest, and the owner of the lodge, Jimmy Brock, responded by pouring muriatic acid into the pool. The acid was too diluted to pose any real threat, but many of the protesters were eventually arrested...Photo credit: AP / JK

Social Mvmts: Monson Motor Lodge Pool Protest (1964)

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-- This editorial cartoon from The Atlanta Journal and Constitution was published in response to the so-called Harlem Race Riots and includes caricatures of the leaders of the SCLC (Martin Luther King), the NAACP, SNCC, and CORE playing the violin to the music of “We Shall Overcome.” The cartoon is attempting to discredit the nonviolent protests of the Civil Rights Era by lumping them together with protests where property was destroyed.
A crowd in Harlem shouts at police on Lenox Avenue during the Harlem uprising, 1964. Photo credit: Buyenlarge
Two terrified African American girls flee police officers during social unrest in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn. This is the second night of social unrest, which began in Harlem, July 21, 1964. Photo credit: Bettmann / Getty

Social Mvmts: Harlem Uprising (1964)

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Flanked by Dick Gregory and James Meredith, Martin Luther King, Jr. walks in the March Against Fear near Jackson, Mississippi, June 6, 1966.  Photo Credit: Flip Schulke / Corbis
Mississippi patrolmen shove Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other marchers during the 220-mile “March Against Fear” from Memphis, Tenn. to Jackson, Miss. June 8, 1966.  Photo credit: Underwood Archives / Getty Images
On June 6, 1966 James Meredith was shot and wounded in Mississippi on the second day of his 220-mile March Against Fear, which Meredith designed to encourage African Americans to vote.  Photo credit: Jack Thornell

Social Mvmts: March Against Fear (1966)

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The Cairo uprising began on July 17, 1967 in Cairo, Illinois, and persisted for three days. The incident began with the alleged jailhouse suicide of Private Robert Hunt, a young African-American soldier on leave in his hometown of Cairo. Police said Hunt hanged himself with his t-shirt, but Cairo's African-American residents challenged that story. The death touched off a seven-year renewal of civil rights activities in the city.  Photo credit: Preston Ewing, Jr., from "Let my people go"
You black marcher faces crowd of white onlookers. Downtown.  Photo credit: Preston Ewing, Jr., from "Let my people go: Cairo, Illinois, 1967-1973 : civil rights photographs"
"Stop the War Against Black America"  Photo credit: Preston Ewing, Jr., from "Let my people go: Cairo, Illinois, 1967-1973 : civil rights photographs"

Social Mvmts: The Cairo Uprising (1967)

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Detroit Race Riot, 1967  In this photo African American store owners protect their store with rifles and a sign saying 'Soul Brother' [Click on this image to find a short video and analysis exploring the use of language in describing social unrest. Is it a riot or an uprising of the people?] Photo credit: Lee Balterman / Time and Life Pictures
Detroit Burns In The Summer Of Love, 1967  [follow this link to find a short clip and analysis exploring whether social movements should always be nonviolent: http://www.thesociologicalcinema.com/1/post/2013/08/should-social-movements-always-be-nonviolent.html]
Police deploy across Twelfth Street as buildings burn during the Detroit riots of 1967.  Photo credit: J. Edward Bailey

Social Mvmts: The Detroit Rebellion (1967)

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"I Am A Man"  The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, under the leadership of Martin Luther King Jr., in 1968 organized the Poor People's Campaign to demand economic justice. Although King was assassinated later that year, the planned protest was not postponed. The demonstrators called for President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration to focus more resources on the War on Poverty. Source: National Museum of American History
National Guardsmen look on as African-American protesters begin a march to downtown Memphis wearing placards reading, "I AM A MAN." It was the third consecutive march held by the group in as many days, February 12, 1968. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., who had left town after the first march, would soon return and be assassinated — in Memphis, Tennessee.  Photo credit: Getty
Striking sanitation workers and their supporters are flanked by bayonet-wielding National Guard troops and armored vehicles during a march on City Hall in Memphis, Tennessee, on March 29, 1968, one day after a similar march erupted in violence, leaving one person dead and several injured. Photo credit: Charlie Kelly / AP

Social Mvmts: Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike (1968)

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Mapping the 1968 Baltimore Riots: Incident Locations  [Was the turmoil in Baltimore a riot, an uprising, a rebellion, part of a social movement, or was it an insurrection? Whatever frame we choose has important consequences for the shape of things to come. Check out this short clip and analysis on this topic]  Source: Miller, 2011 / Magill, Alexandra. 2013."Historical and Contemporary Modes of Racism in Baltimore, Maryland."
A National Guardsman can do little as a shop burns out of control amid the 1968 riots. Insurers estimated damage in Baltimore at $8 million to $10 million during the unrest. The immediate cause of the rioting was the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4.  Photo credit: William H. Mortimer / Baltimore Sun
432 North Avenue, amidst the #BaltimoreRiots, April 6 - April 14, 1968. The immediate cause of the rioting was the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4.  Source: Hearst Corporation

Social Mvmts: Baltimore Uprising (1968)

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ORIGINAL CAPTION: This photo, made from the Lincoln Memorial, shows the huge crowd, estimated at close to 59,000, that attended the Poor People's "Solidarity Day" rally. Note many of the marchers wading in the reflecting pool beneath the Washington Monument, June 19, 1968 — in Washington, District of Columbia.  Photo credit: Getty
On May 12, 1968, over 2,500 activists from Mississippi arrived by bus in Washington, D.C. for a gathering of mass protest that was planned to be long-term at the National Mall. An architect named John Wiebenson secured five acres around the Reflecting pool in Washington in order to build a small independent city with its own stores, hospital and city hall. This town of protest at our nation's capitol came to be known as “Resurrection City.”
On May 12, 1968, over 2,500 activists from Mississippi arrived by bus in Washington, D.C. for a gathering of mass protest that was planned to be long-term at the National Mall. An architect named John Wiebenson secured five acres around the Reflecting pool in Washington in order to build a small independent city with its own stores, hospital and city hall. This town of protest at our nation's capitol came to be known as “Resurrection City.”  - Photo credit: Jill Freedman

Social Mvmts: Resurrection City (1968)

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NYC protesters take to the streets in response to the acquittal of the officers involved in the beating of Rodney King. Some Asian-owned groceries such as this one were vandalized, April 1992.  Photo credit: Linda Rosier
Looters line up to get in as others exit the smashed glass doors of the Thrifty Drugstore at Vermont Avenue and 3rd Street the day after the Rodney King verdict.  Photo credit: Kirk McKoy
"Burn, baby, burn!" - Protesters after Rodney King Verdict was announced.   Photo credit: Kirk McKoy

Social Mvmts: Los Angeles Civil Unrest (1992)

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(1 of 2) The Arab Spring - A Full Five Years  Source: The Economist
(2 of 2) The Arab Spring - A Full Five Years  Source: The Economist
A Libyan anti-government protester with her face painted in the colors of Libya's former national flag takes part in a gathering in the city of Benghazi in February 2011. Photo credit: AFP

Social Mvmts: Arab Spring (2010 - 2014)

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Photo credit: _nelsonthomas, on instagram Sick Burns, American Pay, American Dreams, Clap Back, Political Ideology, Activism, Religion And Politics, Political Discussion, Dont You Know
"Racism is so American that when you protest it people think you are protesting America."
Photo credit: _nelsonthomas, on instagram
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
Antiracism work is important, but....I don't want it to be reduced to a checklist. People saying, "I read this book, and I saw this podcast, and I follow this person on social media, so I get it." But you really haven't engaged with Black humanity. Aiko D. Bethea says: "Anti-racist work is not transactional. t's relational." ~ Tarana Burke Pop Culture Art, The Daily Show, World History, I Saw, You Really, I Got This, Equality, Checklist
Antiracism work is important, but....I don't want it to be reduced to a checklist. People saying, "I read this book, and I saw this podcast, and I follow this person on social media, so I get it." But you really haven't engaged with Black humanity. Aiko D. Bethea says: "Anti-racist work is not transactional. t's relational." ~ Tarana Burke
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
"Diets are a cure that don't work for a disease that doesn't exit" was one of the slogans said by the first fat activism movements in the 60s. This is not new information. ~ @SofieHagen Health Info, Health Care, Scarification, Loving Your Body, Body Modifications, Discover Yourself, Slogan, Disease
"Diets are a cure that don't work for a disease that doesn't exit" was one of the slogans said by the first fat activism movements in the 60s. This is not new information. ~ @SofieHagen
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
Kyal Sin, also known as Angel, was a 19-year-old woman from Mandalay. When police killed her on March 3, 2021 during the 2021 Myanmar protests, she became an icon of the anti-coup protest movement. Kyal Sin emerged as an early martyr and symbol of resistance against the military junta's use of violence to suppress a protest In this image, Sin is wearing her iconic T-shirt, "Everything will be ok" Protest Movement, Everything Will Be Ok, Military Coup, Mandalay, Every Thing, Persecution, Martyrs, Note Writing, Old Women
Kyle Sin at the 2021 Myanmar protests
Kyal Sin, also known as Angel, was a 19-year-old woman from Mandalay. When police killed her on March 3, 2021 during the 2021 Myanmar protests, she became an icon of the anti-coup protest movement. Kyal Sin emerged as an early martyr and symbol of resistance against the military junta's use of violence to suppress a protest In this image, Sin is wearing her iconic T-shirt, "Everything will be ok"
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
The Future of Social Activism: How Young Adults Are Supporting Causes, and Why You Should Care
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
M.L.K. wasn't like those BLM agitators... Or was he?
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
Civil Rights Timeline: Highlighting Significant Events in United States History
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
With ‘Stop the Steal’ demonstrations, there has already been disproportionate engagement by militia groups relative to other protests: militia groups have participated in 18% of all ‘Stop the Steal’ demonstrations, while they have engaged in less than 1% of all other demonstrations Source: Kishi, Roudabeh, Hampton Stall, and Sam Jones. 2020. "The Future of 'Stop the Steal': Post-Election Trajectories for Right-Wing Mobilization in the US." ACLED Right Wing, Stall, Engaged, The Globe, Jones, Change, Engagement, Future, Post
Militia Involvement/Presence in "Stop the Steal" Demonstrations (4-28 November 2020)
With ‘Stop the Steal’ demonstrations, there has already been disproportionate engagement by militia groups relative to other protests: militia groups have participated in 18% of all ‘Stop the Steal’ demonstrations, while they have engaged in less than 1% of all other demonstrations Source: Kishi, Roudabeh, Hampton Stall, and Sam Jones. 2020. "The Future of 'Stop the Steal': Post-Election Trajectories for Right-Wing Mobilization in the US." ACLED
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
"I Am A Man"  The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, under the leadership of Martin Luther King Jr., in 1968 organized the Poor People's Campaign to demand economic justice. Although King was assassinated later that year, the planned protest was not postponed. The demonstrators called for President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration to focus more resources on the War on Poverty. Source: National Museum of American History Poor People's Campaign, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Economic Justice, Be A Man, Racial Discrimination, Lyndon, Martin Luther King Jr, National Museum, To Focus
"I Am A Man" The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, under the leadership of Martin Luther King Jr., in 1968 organized the Poor People's Campaign to demand economic justice. Although King was assassinated later that year, the planned protest was not postponed. The demonstrators called for President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration to focus more resources on the War on Poverty. Source: National Museum of American History
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
National Guardsmen look on as African-American protesters begin a march to downtown Memphis wearing placards reading, "I AM A MAN." It was the third consecutive march held by the group in as many days, February 12, 1968. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., who had left town after the first march, would soon return and be assassinated — in Memphis, Tennessee.  Photo credit: Getty Downtown Memphis, Memphis Tennessee, Fahrenheit 451, Seismic, African Diaspora, Martin Luther King, Timeline, History, Man
National Guardsmen look on as African-American protesters begin a march to downtown Memphis wearing placards reading, "I AM A MAN." It was the third consecutive march held by the group in as many days, February 12, 1968. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., who had left town after the first march, would soon return and be assassinated — in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo credit: Getty
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
Striking sanitation workers and their supporters are flanked by bayonet-wielding National Guard troops and armored vehicles during a march on City Hall in Memphis, Tennessee, on March 29, 1968, one day after a similar march erupted in violence, leaving one person dead and several injured. Photo credit: Charlie Kelly / AP Pyramid Scheme, Man Of War, River I, Human Dignity, Upcoming Books, Working People, Educational Projects, National Guard
Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike, 1968
Striking sanitation workers and their supporters are flanked by bayonet-wielding National Guard troops and armored vehicles during a march on City Hall in Memphis, Tennessee, on March 29, 1968, one day after a similar march erupted in violence, leaving one person dead and several injured. Photo credit: Charlie Kelly / AP
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
The Uprising is arguably one of the first imges to feature a raised fist as a palpable representation of resistance. The painting was likely inspired by the revolution of 1848, which saw the overthrow of Louis-Philippe’s monarchy in France. Artist: Honoré Daumier Karl Marx, Metropolitan Museum, Ludwig Xiv, Honore Daumier, Henri Fantin Latour, Social Realism, William Adolphe Bouguereau, Art Database, Realism Art
"The Uprising," c. 1848
The Uprising is arguably one of the first imges to feature a raised fist as a palpable representation of resistance. The painting was likely inspired by the revolution of 1848, which saw the overthrow of Louis-Philippe’s monarchy in France. Artist: Honoré Daumier
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
-- This editorial cartoon from The Atlanta Journal and Constitution was published in response to the so-called Harlem Race Riots and includes caricatures of the leaders of the SCLC (Martin Luther King), the NAACP, SNCC, and CORE playing the violin to the music of “We Shall Overcome.” The cartoon is attempting to discredit the nonviolent protests of the Civil Rights Era by lumping them together with protests where property was destroyed. Atlanta Journal, Editorial Cartoon, White Supremacy, Us History, Harlem, Caricatures, Constitution
“Brother Nero, do you smell smoke?” July 26, 1964
-- This editorial cartoon from The Atlanta Journal and Constitution was published in response to the so-called Harlem Race Riots and includes caricatures of the leaders of the SCLC (Martin Luther King), the NAACP, SNCC, and CORE playing the violin to the music of “We Shall Overcome.” The cartoon is attempting to discredit the nonviolent protests of the Civil Rights Era by lumping them together with protests where property was destroyed.
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
Have you or a close friend or family member attended a rally or protest since George Floyd's death in May, or not? Select all that apply, August 2020 Source: NPR Floyd May, Close Friends, Protest, Rally, Family Members, Bar Chart, August, George, Movement
Have you or someone you know attended a protest since George Floyd's death? 2020
Have you or a close friend or family member attended a rally or protest since George Floyd's death in May, or not? Select all that apply, August 2020 Source: NPR
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema
A crowd in Harlem shouts at police on Lenox Avenue during the Harlem uprising, 1964. Photo credit: Buyenlarge Lenox, Photo Credit, Avenue, Crowd, Police, Quick
A crowd in Harlem shouts at police, 1964
A crowd in Harlem shouts at police on Lenox Avenue during the Harlem uprising, 1964. Photo credit: Buyenlarge
The Sociological Cinema
The Sociological Cinema