Social Mvmts: The Black Panther Party

The Black Panther Party (BPP) grew out of the social and political upheaval of the 1960s and quickly became the most visible face of the Black Power movement…
more
·
513 Pins
 3y
"Unite for a School Boycott! If the schools do not agree to teach heritage and history…" 1966.
"Initiated in 1966 when California still allowed residents to carry unconcealed weapons in public, Panthers took their guns to the street to defend their community against questionable police conduct (Abron 180). When party members saw a young Black "brother or sister" being interrogated or arrested by a police officer..." Source: Kirkby, Ryan J. "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised. Community Activism and the Black Panther Party, 1966–1971"
Bobby Seale and Huey P. Newton of The Black Panther Party, 1966 — in Oakland, CA. #bpp #blackpantherparty

Social Mvmts: BPP (1966)

8 Pins
Thirty armed members of the Black Panther Party went to the California State Capitol to protest the Mulford Act, May 2, 1967.  Photo credit: World Wide Photos
Huey Newton, founder of the Black Panther Party, sits in a chair and smokes a cigarette at party headquarters in San Francisco, 1967.  Photo credit: Ted Streshinsky
"Why Was Denzil Dowell Killed," April 25, 1967. The Black Panther

Social Mvmts: BPP (1967)

13 Pins
Kendall Haggerty with a "Black Autographs" folder and Black doll at a "Free Huey" rally, DeFremery Park, 1968.  Photo credit: Bob Fitch — in Oakland, California.
Panthers march down Second Avenue in New York City on their way to the United Nations, 1968. Photo credit: Bettman / Corbis
George Murray, Minister of Education, teaching English at San Francisco State College, San Francisco, CA, Oct. 2, 1968 — in San Francisco, California.  Photo credit: Pirkle Jones / University of California, Santa Cruz

Social Mvmts: BPP (1968)

60 Pins
Fred Hampton, Illinois Black Panther Party Chairman, speaks at demonstration outside Cook County Hospital. Over 400 protesters attended the Friday afternoon rally. Hampton called for "health care to meet the needs of the people," 1969
In Oakland, California.  Photo credit: Ruth-Marion Baruch

Social Mvmts: BPP (1969)

105 Pins
"In Revolution One Wins Or One Dies...Death to the Fascist Pigs," 1970 (Vol. 5, No. 17)  Artist: Emory Douglas
"Romaine 'Chip' Fitzgerald, Political Prisoner 1970, San Quentin Prison, Death Row," The Black Panther, August 8, 1970.
"We just ain't gonna let nobody stand in the way of our freedom, nobody," April 25, 1970  Artist: Emory Douglas

Social Mvmts: BPP (1970)

89 Pins
The Black Panther, January 2, 1971
To all revolutionary artists - I would like to take this time to express on behalf of the Black Panther Party our warmest thanks to all revolutionary artists who have given their talents and thoughts to the people through revolutionary art. We would like to say that every artist's work that has appeared in the Black Panther Newspaper this past year has been a great contribution of visual interpretation of the ideology of the Black Panther Party and of the oppressed people of the world.
"Boyette Still Refuses to Donate to the Community's Survival Programs," The Black Panther, November 29, 1971.

Social Mvmts: BPP (1971)

59 Pins
"The Black Panther Party's Free Busing to Prisons Program Will Be Taking Friends and Relatives to Visit Prisoners at the Following Prisons."  Source: The Black Panther, Saturday, October 21, 1972
"Yes, I'm against the war in Vietnam, I'm for African liberation, voter registration and the people's survival!"  Emory Douglas wasn't the only artist to have work featured on the Black Panther Party's newsletter. Gaye Dickson, who went by the name "Asali," also produced images for the paper. Many of Asali's images were of children and strong women from the Black community, July 1, 1972.  Artist: Gayle Dickson, Black Panther Party artist 1972-1977
A Black Panther Party member prepares bags of food for distribution at the Black Panther Community Survival Conference, 1972.  Photo credit: Steven Kasher Gallery — in Oakland, California.

Social Mvmts: BPP (1972)

39 Pins
Black Panther Party administers free sickle cell testing in Boston, 1973.  Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this image?
"Elect Bobby Seale Mayor of Oakland - Vote May 15th," The Black Panther, May 12, 1973.
"Boycott Safeway," The Black Panther, Vol. 10, No.11, Saturday, July 28, 1973

Social Mvmts: BPP (1973)

15 Pins
"Serving the people--Black Panthers Kent Ford supervises children from King School, who get a free hot breakfast under a Panther program. Ford says the free breakfast, and free dental and medical clinics sponsored by the Panthers, are 'to help our people survive,'" 1974  Photo credit: The Oregonian
Elaine Brown to the Black Panther Party after she replaced Huey Newton, August 1974 -  "We're going to set a revolutionary example here. And the example we lay down in Oakland will be the spark that lights the prairie fire. We will carry our torch to another city, and then another. Each time, each place, the people will take their lead from us, the revolutionary vanguard...~ Excerpt from Elaine Brown's A Taste of Power
"Nightmare, nightmare we'll force you away never to let you come back to haunt us another day."  The Black Panther - November 16, 1974  Artist: Emory Douglas

Social Mvmts: BPP (1974)

7 Pins
(2 of 5) Polynesian Panther Movement
US leader of the Black Panthers Eldridge Cleaver, 1975.  Photo credit: Rene Burri
The Black Panther: Intercommunal News Service - Vol.XIII, No.25 (August 11, 1975)  Contents include articles on George Jackson, prison reform, the rape of JoAnne Little, racial unrest and violence in Detroit, MI and Nacogdoches, TX, Elaine Brown re-opening the Chicago BPP office, and a memorial piece to Jonathan Jackson.

Social Mvmts: BPP (1975)

6 Pins
Artist: Emory Douglas
"Memorial Rally for Slain Black Youth. On November 7 Tyrone Guyton Would Have been 18-years-old," The Black Panther, November 13, 1976.
COINTELPRO, April 17 1976.   Cointelpro was a series of covert FBI operations against the Panthers; the faces represent those killed.  Artist: Emory Douglas

Social Mvmts: BPP (1976)

17 Pins
The Black Panther: Intercommunal News Service - Vol.XVII, No.21 (November 12, 1977)  Contents include articles on Chicano COINTELPRO, the Vice Squad conspiracy against Huey Newton, issues facing students during the Oakland School Strike, the Voting Rights Act, Black unemployment, Border Patrol raids, health care among the rural poor in California, and an excerpt from Huey P. Newton's Revolutionary Suicide
The Black Panther: Intercommunal News Service - Vol.XVI, No.30 (June 11, 1977)  Contents include articles on the Chicago Police Riot, a court decision upholding the BPP's right to sue the FBI and CIA, welfare, serving oppressed white communities, Black steelworkers fighting union racism, U.C. Berkeley anti-Apartheid protests, and an excerpt from Huey P. Newton's Revolutionary Suicide.
The Black Panther: Intercommunal News Service - Vol.XVII, No.28 (December 31, 1977)  Contents include articles on the Azanian youth march in South Africa, the academic success of the BPP's Oakland Community School, Oakland's economic problems, principles of radical psychiatry, the imprisonment of Joanne Little, issues facing southern farmworkers, current events, and a 1977 "Year in Review."

Social Mvmts: BPP (1977)

6 Pins
Huey Newton was arrested in Santa Cruz County on May 11, 1978. He was charged with attempted murder after gun shots were fired during an argument at the Mediterranean Bar in Seacliff Beach. He was later acquitted on July 13, 1978 by Judge William Kelsay, who didn't believe there was enough evidence for Newton to stand trial on felony charges. At the time of his arrest and acquittal, Newton was a resident of Santa Cruz County.

Social Mvmts: BPP (1978)

2 Pins
Why did the FBI murder Fred Hampton in 1969?
black and white photograph of people standing in front of a crowd
Fred Hampton speaks outside Cook County Hospital, 1969
Fred Hampton, Illinois Black Panther Party Chairman, speaks at demonstration outside Cook County Hospital. Over 400 protesters attended the Friday afternoon rally. Hampton called for "health care to meet the needs of the people," 1969
a group of children sitting around a table with food in front of them and the caption that says,
Kent Ford supervises children enjoying a free hot breakfast, 1974
"Serving the people--Black Panthers Kent Ford supervises children from King School, who get a free hot breakfast under a Panther program. Ford says the free breakfast, and free dental and medical clinics sponsored by the Panthers, are 'to help our people survive,'" 1974 Photo credit: The Oregonian
three children sitting at a table eating food
Image of children laughing while eating at one of the Black Panther Party's Free Breakfast events
Photo credit: Does anyone know where this image was taken, when it was taken, or who took it?
an old black panther magazine cover with a boy holding a skateboard in front of him
"1971 - The Year of the Youth"
The Black Panther, January 2, 1971
Kendall Haggerty with a "Black Autographs" folder and Black doll at a "Free Huey" rally, DeFremery Park, 1968.  Photo credit: Bob Fitch — in Oakland, California. Stanford Library, Black Consciousness, Pop Culture Art, Oakland California, Stanford University, Black Doll
Kendall Haggerty with a "Black Autographs" folder and Black doll at a "Free Huey" rally
Kendall Haggerty with a "Black Autographs" folder and Black doll at a "Free Huey" rally, DeFremery Park, 1968. Photo credit: Bob Fitch — in Oakland, California.
Black Panther Party administers free sickle cell testing in Boston, 1973.  Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this image? History Books, African American History, Civil Rights, Mississippi Delta, In Boston
Black Panther Party administers free sickle cell testing in Boston, 1973
Black Panther Party administers free sickle cell testing in Boston, 1973. Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this image?
the black panther party's free busing to prison program is now on display
"The Black Panther Party's Free Busing to Prisons Program Will Be Taking Friends and Relatives to Visit Prisoners at the Following Prisons." Source: The Black Panther, Saturday, October 21, 1972
black and white photograph of woman serving children at table in large room with tables full of chairs
Black Panther Free Breakfast for Children Program at St. Augustine's Episcopal Church, 1969
In Oakland, California. Photo credit: Ruth-Marion Baruch
black and white photograph of protestors marching down the street with flags in front of tall buildings
Panthers march down Second Avenue in New York City on their way to the United Nations, 1968. Photo credit: Bettman / Corbis
an old movie poster with two men in silhouettes and one man holding a baseball bat
"In Revolution One Wins Or One Dies...Death to the Fascist Pigs," 1970 (Vol. 5, No. 17) Artist: Emory Douglas
a drawing of a woman holding a baseball glove
Yes, I'm against the war in Vietnam!
"Yes, I'm against the war in Vietnam, I'm for African liberation, voter registration and the people's survival!" Emory Douglas wasn't the only artist to have work featured on the Black Panther Party's newsletter. Gaye Dickson, who went by the name "Asali," also produced images for the paper. Many of Asali's images were of children and strong women from the Black community, July 1, 1972. Artist: Gayle Dickson, Black Panther Party artist 1972-1977
an old black and white photo of a woman serving food to children at a table
Charles Bursey serving children at Black Panther Free Breakfast for Children Program
Charles Bursey serving children at Black Panther Free Breakfast for Children Program, St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church, May 19, 1969. Photo credit: Ruth-Marion Baruch / University of California, Santa Cruz