Social Mvmts: Anti-War Movements

Collection by The Sociological Cinema • Last updated 11 weeks ago

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This album explores anti-war movements, especially those that have manifested in the United States. Widespread organized opposition to war has existed since at least the time of the Civil War, but in the modern era, the movement against the Vietnam War is perhaps best known and was likely an important factor in ending the conflict.

The Sociological Cinema
Supporters of the Vietnam moratorium lie in the Sheep Meadow of New York’s Central Park as hundreds of black and white balloons float skyward. A spokesman for the moratorium committee said the black balloons represented Americans who died in Vietnam under the Nixon administration, and the white balloons symbolized the number of Americans who would die if the war continued, November 14, 1969.  Photo credit: AP / J. Spencer Jones Central Park, New York Central, Vietnam Protests, Black And White Balloons, Vietnam War Photos, North Vietnam, Manhattan New York, Iconic Photos, Us Marines

Supporters of the Vietnam moratorium lie in the Sheep Meadow of New York’s Central Park as hundreds of black and white balloons float skyward. A spokesman for the moratorium committee said the black balloons represented Americans who died in Vietnam under the Nixon administration, and the white balloons symbolized the number of Americans who would die if the war continued, November 14, 1969. Photo credit: AP / J. Spencer Jones

Richard Avedon - Ban the Bombers protest march, Times Square, New York, 1963 James Baldwin, Artwork Images, Power To The People, Richard Avedon, Human Nature, The New Yorker, Old And New, The Outsiders, Identity

"Wars Will End When Men Refuse to Fight," 1963

"Military Service Is Guilt" | "World Wide Strike for Peace" | "Wars Will End When Men Refuse to Fight" -- “Ban the Bombers” protest march, New York, May 8, 1963. Photo credit: Richard Avedon

"This bomb crater was dug by Rainbow People of Ann Arbor on July 4, 1972. It symbolizes the death and destruction caused by U.S. bombs to the people of Indochina."  Peter Andrews, Kathy Kelley, Lawrence (Pun) Plamondon, David S. Fenton, David Sinclair and other members of the Rainbow People's Party and the commune at 1510 Hill St fill in the bomb crater they had dug nearly 3 years earlier in the front lawn, May 1975 — in Ann Arbor Michigan.  Photo credit: Herald Company, Inc. David Sinclair, Ann Arbor, Vietnam War, Destruction, 3 Years, Photo Credit, Lawn, Michigan, Fill

"This bomb crater was dug by Rainbow People of Ann Arbor on July 4, 1972. It symbolizes the death and destruction caused by U.S. bombs to the people of Indochina." Peter Andrews, Kathy Kelley, Lawrence (Pun) Plamondon, David S. Fenton, David Sinclair and other members of the Rainbow People's Party and the commune at 1510 Hill St fill in the bomb crater they had dug nearly 3 years earlier in the front lawn, May 1975 — in Ann Arbor Michigan. Photo credit: Herald Company, Inc.

"This bomb crater was dug by Rainbow People of Ann Arbor on July 4, 1972. It symbolizes the death and destruction caused by U.S. bombs to the people of Indochina."  Peter Andrews, Kathy Kelley, Lawrence (Pun) Plamondon, David S. Fenton, David Sinclair and other members of the Rainbow People's Party and the commune at 1510 Hill St fill in the bomb crater they had dug nearly 3 years earlier in the front lawn, May 1975 — in Ann Arbor Michigan.  Photo credit: Herald Company, Inc. David Sinclair, Ann Arbor, Vietnam War, Destruction, Photo Credit, Michigan, Nostalgia, United States, Street View

"This bomb crater was dug by Rainbow People of Ann Arbor on July 4, 1972. It symbolizes the death and destruction caused by U.S. bombs to the people of Indochina." Peter Andrews, Kathy Kelley, Lawrence (Pun) Plamondon, David S. Fenton, David Sinclair and other members of the Rainbow People's Party and the commune at 1510 Hill St fill in the bomb crater they had dug nearly 3 years earlier in the front lawn, May 1975 — in Ann Arbor Michigan. Photo credit: Herald Company, Inc.

Members of a women's brigade hold a banner protesting the Vietnam War at a march led by former Montana Rep. Jeannette Rankin in Autos Hot Wheels, Jeannette Rankin, Vietnam Protests, American Exceptionalism, Vietnam War Photos, Protest Signs, History Projects, World Pictures, Look At You

Over 5,000 women from around the United States assembled near the U.S. Capitol to protest the Vietnam war. In this image Jeanette Rankin stands with a group holding a sign, "End the war in Vietnam and social crisis at home!" January 15, 1968. Photo credit: NPR — in Washington, District of Columbia.

Daniel J. Berrigan, Defiant Priest Who Preached Pacifism, Dies at 94 American War, American History, American Catholic, First Indochina War, Catholic Priest, Roman Catholic, Daniel J, Civil Disobedience, Boho Life

Two Roman Catholic priests watch baskets of draft board records burn on 5/17/1968 after the records were removed from the Cantonsville, Maryland, draft board office by nine persons--five of them priests. Father Philip Berrigan (left) and his brother, Father Daniel Berrigan (right) were arrested along with the seven other participants. Father Philip Berrigan was involved in a demonstration last October in which blood was poured on draft records. Credit: Bettmann

Mark Rudd led student protests at Columbia University in North Vietnam, Vietnam War, Bob Dylan Songs, Steve Miller Band, New York Photos, Revolutionaries, Old And New, Vignettes

SDS leader Mark Rudd at a Columbia University protest, 1968

Photo credit: Columbia University Archives

Police clashing with student protestors outside Hamilton Hall at Columbia University. John Lindsay, Vietnam War, Photo Credit, Hamilton, Columbia, The Outsiders, Police, University, Student

Police clashing with student protestors outside Hamilton Hall at Columbia University. Photo credit: John Lindsay / AP Photo

Students in Hamilton Hall at Columbia University on April That night, African-American students asked white students to leave and seize other buildings, so they could keep a separate protest. Photo credit: Don Hogan Charles / The New York Times / Redux Historical Romance Novels, African American Studies, Joe Cocker, Associate Professor, Girl Inspiration, Martin Luther King, Life Magazine, Woodstock, Columbia

Students in Hamilton Hall at Columbia University on April 23, 1968. That night, African-American students asked white students to leave and seize other buildings, so they could keep a separate protest. Photo credit: Don Hogan Charles / The New York Times / Redux

On April students at Columbia University started a weeklong occupation of the Low Library to protest the school’s ties with the Institute for Defense Analysis, a non-profit corporation that supported the U. involvement in the Vietnam War. School Plan, School S, Ivy League Schools, The White Album, Modern History, People Talk, Social Science, Vietnam War, Mad Men

Mark Rudd (center), president of Students for a Democratic Society, addresses students at Columbia University on May 3, 1968. Photo credit: Hulton Archive / Getty Images

In this image police bust the protesters, April Photo credit: Charles Ruppmann / New York Daily News Archive / Getty Images New York Daily News, Vietnam War, Ny Times, Photo Credit, American History, Columbia, Student, Pos, Image

In this image police bust the protesters, April 30, 1968. Photo credit: Charles Ruppmann / New York Daily News Archive / Getty Images

Inside the 1968 Student Protests That Changed the World Vietnam War, Change The World, Childhood, University, Photo Credit, Columbia, Spirit, Group

This image is from the campus-building occupation at Columbia University. Hilton Obenzinger remembers the occupation: “We were all living together, and we called it a commune. The spirit was of cooperation; everyone had to make decisions together; everyone had to speak; everyone had to act as a group,” April 1968. Photo credit: Catherine Ursillo, from the Collection of Paul Cronin

Inside the 1968 Student Protests That Changed the World Vietnam War, Change The World, Columbia, University, Photo Credit, Afro, Gym, American, Fotografia

"Columbia has declared war on Harlem." -- student protesters, including Columbia student and Student Afro-American Society (S.A.S.) leader Raymond Brown (second from left). Fellow Columbia student and S.A.S. member Arnim Johnson remembers, “On April 23 [1968], when the movement started, we were protesting the gym that Columbia was building in Morningside Park. The university said the gym was going to be mixed-use, but it really wasn’t.” Photo credit: Richard Howard

A new book unveils many previously unseen images of Bowie, taken by renowned photographer Steve Schapiro. Freedom Fighters, Vietnam War, David Bowie, Change The World, New Books, In The Heights, Columbia, Unseen Images

"Columbia is the enemy of all Black people." -- This is a an image from the Columbia student protests. Former Barnard student and Students for a Democratic Society (S.D.S.) member Nancy Biberman notes, “Two strands of anger and disgust converged: what the university was doing to aid the war effort, and what [it] was doing that was racist in our neighborhood.” Photo credit: Steve Schapiro.

This is an image from the anti-war student uprising at Columbia University, April Photo credit: Larry Fink. Robert Mcnamara, Oral History, Citizenship, Vietnam War, Change The World, Vanity Fair, Photo Credit, Columbia

This is an image from the anti-war student uprising at Columbia University, April 1968. Photo credit: Larry Fink.

Police forced Columbia University students out of Hamilton Hall on May ending the students’ occupation in the building. John Jay College, Gay Rights Movement, Columbia College, Catholic University, New York Police, Pope Benedict, The Third Man, Forgetting The Past, Fotografia

in April 1968, the students from Columbia University were so enraged by the Vietnam War they held their the dean hostage. On the night of April 30, 1968, about 1,000 New York police officers inflicted 148 injuries on university students. 720 were arrested. In this image, police with helmets warn the protesters inside to leave. Photo credit: New York Times