Social Mvmts: Selma to Montgomery March

This board explores the 1965 Selma to Montgomery march & the efforts to secure voting rights for blacks that preceded it. In Feb., while breaking up a march in…
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a group of people standing next to each other holding a sign that says stop police killings
"This picture is 55 years old," 1965
A spectator at the Selma to Montgomery march with a sign condemning police killings presages the grievances of today’s Black Lives Matter movement, 1965. Photo credit: Steve Schapiro
"Selma: Beatings Start the Savage Season," March 1965.  Photo credit: LIFE magazine — in Selma, Alabama. Selma Alabama, Capitol Building, Life Magazine, Martin Luther King, Photo Credit, Alabama, Politics, Magazine
Selma: Beatings Start the Savage Season
"Selma: Beatings Start the Savage Season," March 1965. Photo credit: LIFE magazine — in Selma, Alabama.
a painting of men standing together in front of a white wall with black and orange colors
Dear America
Artist: Shanequa Gay
black and white photograph of people walking down the street
James Baldwin, Joan Baez, and James Forman (left to right) enter Montgomery, Alabama on the Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights, 1965. Photo credit: James Karales
an old black and white photo of people on the street with police cars in the background
Civil rights demonstrators struggle on the ground as state troopers use violence to break up a march on what is known as “Bloody Sunday,” March 7, 1965. Photo credit: The Birmingham News
the cover of ebony magazine with an image of many people walking in front of them
"50,000 March on Montgomery," May 1965 In this Ebony cover, The Rev. Ralph Abernathy, Ralph Bunche, Martin Luther King Jr., Mrs. King and Rosa Parks on the first of a five--day march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, March 21, 1965.
black and white photograph of young men standing in front of an american flag with writing on their faces
A group of civil rights demonstrators march from Selma to Montgomery, 1965 Photo credit: Bruce Davidson
a man holding an american flag and walking down the street with other people behind him
Jim Letherer was a Jewish amputee from Saginaw, Michigan. In 1965, he walked the entire 50 miles from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, on crutches. Photo credit: Spider Martin — in Selma, Alabama.
a man in a suit and tie standing next to a sign
"I was beaten, my skull was fractured, & I was arrested more than 40 times so each & every one of us can register to vote. Do your part." ~ John Robert Lewis
a group of people standing around a man laying on top of a bed in the street
Amelia Boynton Robinson lays beaten and tear gassed on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. She was attempting, along with up to 600 other marchers, to cross the bridge from Selma to Montgomery, but the marchers were stopped and beaten by police, March 7, 1965 Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this image? — in Selma, Alabama.
black and white photograph of young boy holding an american flag in front of other people
The march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965 Photo credit: Bruce Davidson / Magnum Photos — in Selma, Alabama.
a group of people standing behind a yellow arrow sign
Clergy members singing in 1965 at a police barrier in Selma, Alabama that became known as the Berlin Wall. Photo credit: Dan Budnik / Contact Press Images — in Selma, Alabama.
a black and white photo of a man in a suit with his leg on the ground
A civil rights protester is detained during this protest at the Los Angeles Federal building organized in solidarity with activists marching from Selma to Montgomery, 1965. Photo credit: Charles Brittin — in Los Angeles, California.
a group of people standing next to each other in front of an american flag and building
The Rev. Ralph David Abernathy follows the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King as the Abernathy children march on the front line, leading the Selma to Montgomery march in 1965. The children are Donzaleigh Abernathy in striped sweater, Ralph David Abernathy III and Juandalynn R. Abernathy in glasses. The name of the white minister in the photo is unknown. Photo credit: Abernathy Family
a group of people standing in front of a building talking to each other on the sidewalk
Hecklers insult two black women who are part of a voting rights drive in Selma, 1965. Photo credit: Bob Adelman / Magnum Photos — in Selma, Alabama.
an image of people sitting on the ground in front of trees and one is holding his head
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., center, leads a group of civil rights workers and Selma black people in prayer on Feb. 1, 1965 after they were arrested on charges of parading without a permit. More than 250 persons were arrested as they marched to the Dallas County courthouse as part of a voter registration drive. Photo credit: AP / BH — in Selma, Alabama.
a group of people standing next to each other with an american flag in the background
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3/7/1965: The first Selma to Montgomery March (“Bloody Sunday”) takes place. "In 1965, a voter registration campaign focused in Selma, Alabama, began...[led by] Martin Luther King, Jr., the SNCC, and the SCLC. On March 7, a group of several hundred people set out from Selma on a 54-mile march toward Montgomery, but this protest was stopped short in a brief and violent confrontation (later known as “Bloody Sunday”) between the marchers and state troopers at the Edmund Pettis Bridge."
a woman holding a sign that reads, freedom now core with fur collars
"Freedom Now - CORE" Thousands of women turned out in Harlem to support the struggle for civil rights in Selma, March 1965. Photo credit: Diana Davies
black and white photograph of women holding signs in protest for the great society, chicago
"Whose Great Society?" Harlem supports the Selma Civil Rights Movement, New York City, 1965 Photo credit: Diana Davies Papers
a group of people walking down a street next to each other with police standing behind them
Civil rights demonstrators struggle on the ground as state troopers use violence to break up a march on what is known as “Bloody Sunday,” March 7, 1965. Source: Alabama Department of Public Safety
an old black and white photo of some people in the grass with one woman covering her face
Amelia Boynton Robinson, more than a century old and a matriarch of the civil rights movement, recalls how she was beaten, tear-gassed and left for dead on "Bloody Sunday." Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this photo?
black and white photograph of man on cell phone in front of another man with his back to the camera
Civil rights demonstrators struggle amidst tear gas as state troopers use violence to break up a march on what is known as “Bloody Sunday,” March 7, 1965. Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this photo?
Alabama state troopers wear gas masks as tear gas is fired on marchers in 1965. Fifty years ago, about 600 people began a 50-mile march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital of Montgomery so that they could protest discriminatory practices that prevented black people from voting. But as the marchers descended to the foot of the Edward Pettus Bridge, state troopers used brutal force and tear gas to push them back. The event is now known as "Bloody Sunday." African People, Gas Masks, Edward
Alabama state troopers wear gas masks as tear gas is fired on marchers in 1965. Fifty years ago, about 600 people began a 50-mile march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital of Montgomery so that they could protest discriminatory practices that prevented black people from voting. But as the marchers descended to the foot of the Edward Pettus Bridge, state troopers used brutal force and tear gas to push them back. The event is now known as "Bloody Sunday."
black and white photograph of a man walking down the street
Alabama state troopers wear gas masks as tear gas is fired on marchers in 1965. Fifty years ago, about 600 people began a 50-mile march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital of Montgomery so that they could protest discriminatory practices that prevented black people from voting. But as the marchers descended to the foot of the Edward Pettus Bridge, state troopers used brutal force and tear gas to push them back. The event is now known as "Bloody Sunday."
Alabama state troopers wear gas masks as tear gas is fired on marchers in 1965. Fifty years ago, about 600 people began a 50-mile march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital of Montgomery so that they could protest discriminatory practices that prevented black people from voting. But as the marchers descended to the foot of the Edward Pettus Bridge, state troopers used brutal force and tear gas to push them back. The event is now known as "Bloody Sunday." Action, Ideas, And Justice For All, Veteran
Alabama state troopers wear gas masks as tear gas is fired on marchers in 1965. Fifty years ago, about 600 people began a 50-mile march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital of Montgomery so that they could protest discriminatory practices that prevented black people from voting. But as the marchers descended to the foot of the Edward Pettus Bridge, state troopers used brutal force and tear gas to push them back. The event is now known as "Bloody Sunday."
a large group of people are walking down the street
More than 2,500 people marched in downtown Miami on March 25th, 1965 to protest racial violence in Selma. Photo credit: Albert Coya / Miami Herald
an old black and white photo of people digging dirt in the middle of a street
An officer accosts an unconscious woman as mounted police officers attack civil rights marchers in Selma, Alabama who were attempting to begin a 50-mile march to Montgomery. Mounted policeman in background are part of Sheriff Jim Clark's Dallas County posse. Police used tear gas, clubs, whips and ropes to turn back the demonstrators as they crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge over the Alabama River at the city limits, March 7, 1965. Photo credit: Bettmann / Corbis
a group of people standing next to each other
"Nuns and Civil Rights," March 1965. Catholic nuns joined the march to Montgomery on the third attempt, from March 21 to March 25, 1965. Photo credit: Steve Schapiro
a group of people are walking down the street with flags and signs on them,
I Want To Hold Your Hand
Martin Luther King Jr. on the first of a five-day march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, March 21, 1965. Marching on his right is Ralph Bunche, and holding his hand is Coretta Scott King, then Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth. Photo credit: Bob Adelman
a blue and white sign that says historic route with people walking on it in the background
Historic Selma to Montgomery Route Photo credit: Mr. Ghana, on Instagram (https://instagram.com/p/0G0q0ykMUP/)