Social Mvmts: Selma to Montgomery March

Collection by The Sociological Cinema • Last updated 4 weeks ago

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This board explores the 1965 Selma to Montgomery march & the efforts to secure voting rights for blacks that preceded it. In Feb., while breaking up a march in Marion, police shot and killed Jimmie Jackson as he attempted to protect his mother. In response, activists set out on 3/7, to march from Selma to Montgomery. In Selma, police attacked the marchers in what would become known as ‘‘Bloody Sunday.’’ On 3/25, Martin Luther King, Jr. finally led thousands to the Montgomery capitol building.

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A spectator at the Selma to Montgomery march with a sign condemning police killings presages the grievances of today’s Black Lives Matter movement, 1965. Photo credit: Steve Schapiro Black Fathers, Let That Sink In, Anti Racism, Political Views, Photo Black, History Facts, Black History, Year Old, American History

"This picture is 55 years old," 1965

A spectator at the Selma to Montgomery march with a sign condemning police killings presages the grievances of today’s Black Lives Matter movement, 1965. Photo credit: Steve Schapiro

"Selma: Beatings Start the Savage Season," March Photo credit: LIFE magazine — in Selma, Alabama. Selma Alabama, Savage Season, Free Cash, Capitol Building, Martin Luther King, Life Magazine, Photo Credit, Breakup, March

Selma: Beatings Start the Savage Season

"Selma: Beatings Start the Savage Season," March 1965. Photo credit: LIFE magazine — in Selma, Alabama.

James Baldwin, Joan Baez, and James Forman (left to right) enter Montgomery, Alabama on the Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights, Photo credit: James Karales James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, Joan Baez, Black History Facts, Black History Month, Georgia, Civil Rights Movement, African American History, Black Is Beautiful

James Baldwin, Joan Baez, and James Forman (left to right) enter Montgomery, Alabama on the Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights, 1965. Photo credit: James Karales

Unconscious body of civil rights marcher after mounted police officers attacked marchers in Selma, Alabama as they were beginning a 50 mile march to Montgomery to protest race discrimination in voter registration. Black History Facts, Us History, Forgetting The Past, African American History, Civil Rights, March 7, Black People, Selma Alabama, Historia

Civil rights demonstrators struggle on the ground as state troopers use violence to break up a march on what is known as “Bloody Sunday,” March 7, 1965. Photo credit: The Birmingham News

"Ebony" Magazine covers the African-American civil rights march on Montgomery on page 46 of its May 1965 issue. Jet Magazine, Black Magazine, Life Magazine, Magazine Wall, Black History Facts, Black History Month, Ebony Magazine Cover, Magazine Covers, The Jackson Five

"50,000 March on Montgomery," May 1965 In this Ebony cover, The Rev. Ralph Abernathy, Ralph Bunche, Martin Luther King Jr., Mrs. King and Rosa Parks on the first of a five--day march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, March 21, 1965.

vote jim crow banner ~ "GOP Official Resigns After Saying Purpose Of Voter ID Is To Suppress Votes Of Democrats, ‘Lazy Blacks’" Civil Rights Movement Facts, Sheriff Clarke, Fbi Files, Voter Id, Jim Crow, Martin Luther King, Black History, American History, Federal

A group of civil rights demonstrators march from Selma to Montgomery, 1965 Photo credit: Bruce Davidson

["He walked all the way on one leg." Spider Martin Jim Leatherer from Saginaw, Michigan, a Jewish civil rights marcher, marched the full distance from Selma to Montgomery on crutches. (Civil Rights Photographer Spider Martin) Civil Rights March, Photo Negative, Jewish Men, Civil Rights Movement, History Photos, Historical Pictures, Black History Month, African American History, Civil Rights

Jim Letherer was a Jewish amputee from Saginaw, Michigan. In 1965, he walked the entire 50 miles from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, on crutches. Photo credit: Spider Martin — in Selma, Alabama.

Lewis reflects on his pain through the Civil Rights movement as a way to inspire people to vote during the 2016 election. John Lewis Quotes, Civil Rights Leaders, Black History Facts, African American History, Have Time, Inspire Me, Inspirational Quotes, Motivational Message, Wisdom

"I was beaten, my skull was fractured, & I was arrested more than 40 times so each & every one of us can register to vote. Do your part." ~ John Robert Lewis

Amelia Boynton Robinson: beaten unconscious on the 1965 Bloody Sunday voting rights march in Alabama, and a key figure in the civil rights movement in America. And she's 103 and still going! Black History Facts, Black History Month, Women In History, World History, Brave, Civil Rights Activists, Civil Rights Movement, African American History, Black People

Amelia Boynton Robinson lays beaten and tear gassed on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. She was attempting, along with up to 600 other marchers, to cross the bridge from Selma to Montgomery, but the marchers were stopped and beaten by police, March 7, 1965 Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this image? — in Selma, Alabama.

Bruce Davidson - The Selma March. Alabama, S) I wish bo would quit undoing all the work done during the civil rights movement! Martin Luther King, We Are The World, In This World, Vietnam, Georgia, Atlanta, Daddy, By Any Means Necessary, Fotografia

The march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965 Photo credit: Bruce Davidson / Magnum Photos — in Selma, Alabama.

Our search for understanding in matters of race automatically inclines us toward blackness. But the answers lie in the construction of whiteness. Op-Ed writer Nell Irvin Painter on what is whiteness. Art Students League, Civil Rights Movement, Anti Racism, Recent Events, We Are The World, Sports Illustrated, Social Justice, Ny Times, Identity

Clergy members singing in 1965 at a police barrier in Selma, Alabama that became known as the Berlin Wall. Photo credit: Dan Budnik / Contact Press Images — in Selma, Alabama.

A civil rights protester is detained during this protest at the Los Angeles Federal building organized in solidarity with activists marching from Selma to Montgomery, Photo credit: Charles Brittin — in Los Angeles, California. Martin Luther King, Historia Universal, By Any Means Necessary, Civil Rights Movement, Photo Story, African American History, Rare Photos, Vintage Photos, History Books

A civil rights protester is detained during this protest at the Los Angeles Federal building organized in solidarity with activists marching from Selma to Montgomery, 1965. Photo credit: Charles Brittin — in Los Angeles, California.

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The Rev. Ralph David Abernathy follows the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King as the Abernathy children march on the front line, leading the Selma to Montgomery march in 1965. The children are Donzaleigh Abernathy in striped sweater, Ralph David Abernathy III and Juandalynn R. Abernathy in glasses. The name of the white minister in the photo is unknown. Photo credit: Abernathy Family

Hecklers insult two black women who are part of a voting rights drive in Selma, Photo credit: Bob Adelman / Magnum Photos — in Selma, Alabama. Selma Alabama, Kings & Queens, Civil Rights Movement, My Black Is Beautiful, Magnum Photos, Black History Month, African American History, Black People, Human Rights

Hecklers insult two black women who are part of a voting rights drive in Selma, 1965. Photo credit: Bob Adelman / Magnum Photos — in Selma, Alabama.

Taking a knee. Ultimate form of respect. Amid Trump’s NFL war, photos of Martin Luther King Jr. ‘taking a knee’ resurface - The Washington Post Malcolm X, Black History Facts, Civil Rights Movement, My Black Is Beautiful, King Jr, African American History, Black People, Panther, Religion

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., center, leads a group of civil rights workers and Selma black people in prayer on Feb. 1, 1965 after they were arrested on charges of parading without a permit. More than 250 persons were arrested as they marched to the Dallas County courthouse as part of a voter registration drive. Photo credit: AP / BH — in Selma, Alabama.