Social Mvmts: The Sit-in Movement

On February 1, 1960, the sit-in movement was born when four black college students walked up to a whites-only lunch counter at the local Woolworth's store in…
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The American Nazi Party carry out a counter-demonstration while civil rights protesters stage a sit-in at the Cherrydale Drug Fair, June 9, 1960. Sit-in protesters, left to right, are Laurence Henry, Joan Trumpauer Mulholland and Dion Diamond.  Photo credit: Wally McNamee — in Arlington, Virginia. Civil Rights Movement, High School, Vintage Photos, Jackson Mississippi, Martin Luther King, Luther, American Life, Jim Crow, American
The American Nazi Party carry out a counter-demonstration while civil rights protesters stage a sit-in at the Cherrydale Drug Fair, June 9, 1960. Sit-in protesters, left to right, are Laurence Henry, Joan Trumpauer Mulholland and Dion Diamond. Photo credit: Wally McNamee — in Arlington, Virginia.
Google Doodle on February 1, 2020 depicted the "Greensboro Four," who protested racial segregation through a sit-in movement at the Woolworth's lunch counter during the civil rights movement. Doodles, Banners, History, American Colleges, National Museum, Google Doodles, 60 Years Ago, Black History Month, Greensboro Four
Google Doodle on February 1, 2020 depicted the "Greensboro Four," who protested racial segregation through a sit-in movement at the Woolworth's lunch counter during the civil rights movement.
Dion Diamond listens with his eyes closed to George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party, at a "whites-only" lunch counter, June 1960.  Photo credit: DC Public Library, Star Collection / Washington Post — in Arlington, Virginia. Civil Rights Activists, Rights Activist, Activist, Black History, African Diaspora, Divorce Attorney, Rockwell
Dion Diamond listens with his eyes closed to George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party, at a "whites-only" lunch counter, June 1960. Photo credit: DC Public Library, Star Collection / Washington Post — in Arlington, Virginia.
Whenever we hear white people speak passionately about how Black Lives Matter's methods of protest, such as blocking traffic, are the real problem, we think about polls like this. ----------------- Do you think "sit-ins" at lunch counters, "freedom buses" and other demonstrations by Negroes will hurt or help the Negro's chances of being integrated in the South?  Source: Washington Post, 1961 Racial Equality, Public Opinion Polls, Freedom Riders, Freedom Rides, Public Opinion, Protest, Lives Matter
Whenever we hear white people speak passionately about how Black Lives Matter's methods of protest, such as blocking traffic, are the real problem, we think about polls like this. ----------------- Do you think "sit-ins" at lunch counters, "freedom buses" and other demonstrations by Negroes will hurt or help the Negro's chances of being integrated in the South? Source: Washington Post, 1961
Joan Trumpauer Mulholland participating in a sit-in, 1960 — in Arlington, Virginia  Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this image? Law Student, Martin Luther King Jr, Northern Virginia, Northern
Joan Trumpauer Mulholland participating in a sit-in, 1960 — in Arlington, Virginia Photo credit: Does anyone know who took this image?
First Tallahassee civil rights sit-in, February 13, 1960. Patricia Stephens Due is the woman wearing sunglasses.  Photo credit: Florida State Archives — in Tallahassee, Florida. Florida, Retro, Vintage, Leon, Downtown Tallahassee, Mississippi, County, Tallahassee Florida
First Tallahassee civil rights sit-in, February 13, 1960. Patricia Stephens Due is the woman wearing sunglasses. Photo credit: Florida State Archives — in Tallahassee, Florida.
The sit-in method saw renewed use in the civil-rights movement. A pivotal moment came in 1960, when African-American college students staged a sit-in at the Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina. This image features Ronald Martin, Robert Patterson, and Mark Martin.  Photo credit: Library of Congress — in Greensboro, North Carolina. Elvis Presley, North Carolina, American Odyssey, Social Injustice
The sit-in method saw renewed use in the civil-rights movement. A pivotal moment came in 1960, when African-American college students staged a sit-in at the Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina. This image features Ronald Martin, Robert Patterson, and Mark Martin. Photo credit: Library of Congress — in Greensboro, North Carolina.
"Time of Change," 1962  Photo credit: Bruce Davidson Street Photography, Nyc, Documentary Photographers, Photo Exhibit, Documentary Photography, Weekend In Nyc, Photography Grants, Exhibition
"Time of Change," 1962 Photo credit: Bruce Davidson
Dion Diamond, center, stands up to opposition at a sit-in demonstration in a drug store. Fellow protester Joan Trumpauer is to his left, June 9, 1960. Art, Ideas, Social Justice, Black History Facts, Photographer, Howard University
Dion Diamond, center, stands up to opposition at a sit-in demonstration in a drug store. Fellow protester Joan Trumpauer is to his left, June 9, 1960.
Demonstrators, including many ministers, picket the F.W. Woolworth store in New York, April 14, 1960, in protest of the store's lunch-counter segregation at southern branches of its chain. Atlanta, New York City, York, United States, Protest Signs, Morally Wrong
Demonstrators, including many ministers, picket the F.W. Woolworth store in New York, April 14, 1960, in protest of the store's lunch-counter segregation at southern branches of its chain.
"Negro demonstrator crawls from swinging State police riot clubs during wild melee which followed sit-down attempt on downtown Chester street, April 25, 1964."  Photo credit: UPI Telephoto State Police, America
"Negro demonstrator crawls from swinging State police riot clubs during wild melee which followed sit-down attempt on downtown Chester street, April 25, 1964." Photo credit: UPI Telephoto
Jean Wynona Fleming, a Fisk University student, sits behind bars in a Nashville jail after her arrest at a drugstore lunch counter on March 25, 1960. Sit-ins at nine restaurants protested segregated eating facilities.  Photo credit: Jimmy Ellis, Gannett Black Power, Activists, Inspiration, People, University Student, Biographies, Activism
Jean Wynona Fleming, a Fisk University student, sits behind bars in a Nashville jail after her arrest at a drugstore lunch counter on March 25, 1960. Sit-ins at nine restaurants protested segregated eating facilities. Photo credit: Jimmy Ellis, Gannett
"Wear old clothes Christmas. Don't buy here"  Due to lack of progress in desegregating the lunch counters at Neisner’s, McCrory’s, F.W. Woolworth’s, Walgreen’s and Sear’s stores, Reverend C.K. Steele is seen here picketing downtown stores in Tallahassee, December 6/7, 1960.  Rev Steele was one of the main organizers of the Tallahassee bus boycott that began in May 1956. He also helped MLK organize the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957. Photo credit: Patricia Stephens Clothes, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Old Clothes, Olds, Bethel, Missionary Baptist Church, Preaching, Missionary
"Wear old clothes Christmas. Don't buy here" Due to lack of progress in desegregating the lunch counters at Neisner’s, McCrory’s, F.W. Woolworth’s, Walgreen’s and Sear’s stores, Reverend C.K. Steele is seen here picketing downtown stores in Tallahassee, December 6/7, 1960. Rev Steele was one of the main organizers of the Tallahassee bus boycott that began in May 1956. He also helped MLK organize the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957. Photo credit: Patricia Stephens
Launched the national drive for integrated lunch counters, Feb. 1, 1960. In Woolworth store 2 blocks south.  Photo credit: Greensboro NC, on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/noorthcarolina/6644308891/in/photostream/) African Americans, Us History, Greensboro Nc
Launched the national drive for integrated lunch counters, Feb. 1, 1960. In Woolworth store 2 blocks south. Photo credit: Greensboro NC, on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/noorthcarolina/6644308891/in/photostream/)
An African American youth demonstrator involved in a sitdown at a private dining club is flipped to the ground by a white man (right) after dragging the protester from the front of the entrance of the club at Crawfordville, Georgia, on October 2, 1965. The sign in background says “A Dixie Welcome to Crawfordville.”  Photo credit: Horace Cort / AP Michael Crichton, 50 Years Ago, Club, Dining Club, Looking Back, Man, White Man, 50 Years
An African American youth demonstrator involved in a sitdown at a private dining club is flipped to the ground by a white man (right) after dragging the protester from the front of the entrance of the club at Crawfordville, Georgia, on October 2, 1965. The sign in background says “A Dixie Welcome to Crawfordville.” Photo credit: Horace Cort / AP