Social Mvmts: School Desegregation

There is a good reason why the U.S. Supreme Court's 1954 decision in "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka" is often regarded to be the beginning of the modern…
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a group of people standing next to each other in front of a fenced area
Students on Strike In 1951, fed up with poor conditions at the segregated Robert Russa Moton High School in Farmville, Virginia, a group of students led by 16-year-old Barbara Johns went on strike to demand a new school building. NAACP lawyers convinced the students to go to court to fight for desegregated schools rather than a new segregated one. Farmville became one of five legal cases included in the landmark 1954 SCOTUS, Brown v. Board of Education. Source: African Amer. History Museum
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Linda Brown Smith was a third grader when her father started a class-action suit in 1951 of the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. Photo credit: AP
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Linda Brown & her Sister Walking to School, Topeka, Kansas, 3/1953 - On 5/17/1954, SCOTUS ruled on Brown v. the Board of Education & ended legal public-school segregation in the US.This case was named for the 4th-grader Linda Brown--seen here at 10, w/ her sister Terry Lynn, 6. Under segregation laws they werent allowed to attend the nearby New Summer School but had to walk 6 blocks thru the dangerous Rock Island Switchyard in order to catch a bus to all-black Monroe School. Photo: Carl Iwaski
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Homepage - Freedom Forum
This day in News History: May 17, 1954: The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that racially segregated public schools were inherently unequal.
an old black and white photo of children sitting in school chairs with books on their laps
Donna Jean Barksdale, 11, took a front-row seat and was left alone by white students when Hoxie, Arkansas voluntarily integrated schools in 1955. In part because the Hoxie School District did not have the funds to maintain separate schools, the District moved to abolish its dual educational system by integrating black children into its all-white schools, where approximately 1,000 white children attended. Twenty-one Black students attended on the first day of classes. Although there were no ini
black and white photograph of people standing in line
A lone African-American student waits for class to start at a newly integrated high school, 1956 Photo credit: Robert W. Kelley
A black student is escorted to a waiting car by National Guard troops. Other black students slipped out of a back door at the end of their classes, September 1956. Photo credit: Everett Collection Inc.
A black student is escorted to a waiting car by National Guard troops. Other black students slipped out of a back door at the end of their classes, September 1956. Photo credit: Everett Collection Inc.
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Seven African American teens walking the steps to the school, while the white students are watching on during the demonstration regarding school integration. 1956.
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Dorothy Counts is often touted as the first black student to be enrolled into Harding High School, North Carolina. This 1957 image gives us an idea of the taunts and unnecessary humiliation she had to face during the time. What was once accepted as a part of social behavior is today rightly condemned as racism.
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Often noted as the first Black girl to attend an all white school in the United States, Dorothy Counts is jeered and taunted by her white, male peers, 1957
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Armed Troops Turn Back 9 Negroes at Central High School Source: Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, September 4, 1957
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In this 1957 photo Terrence Roberts is being turned away from Central High School. Roberts would eventually be among the first to integrate Central High School, and later in life he would earn a Ph.D. in Psychology. Photo credit: Central High Museum Historical Collections / UALR Archives
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In 1957, Little Rock Nine (Gloria Ray Karlmark, Terrance Roberts, Melba Patillo, Elizabeth Eckford, Ernest Green, Minnijean Brown-Trickey, Jefferson Thomas, Carlotta Walls LaNier, and Thelma Mothershed-Wair) became the first black students to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. This act of courage and defiance became the catalyst for change in the American educational system. 6 of the 9 students pose with Daisy Lee Gatson Bates in front of SCOTUS. Photo credit: Paul Schutzer
an old black and white photo of people in different faces, including one man with glasses
The Little Rock Nine (top to bottom, left to right), Gloria Ray Karlmark, Terrance Roberts, and Melba Pattillo Beals; Elizabeth Eckford, Ernest Green, and Minnijean Brown-Trickey; Jefferson Thomas, Carlotta Walls LaNier, and Thelma Mothershed-Wair.
an old black and white photo of some people
Elizabeth Eckford is blocked from entering Central High School by Arkansas National Guard, 1957
In this image teenager Elizabeth Eckford is turned away from entering Central High School by Arkansas National Guardsmen under orders from Governor Orval Faubus, 1957. Photo credit: Francis Miller / The LIFE Picture Collection