Today in Black History

A collection of visual media of, or relating to, the answers of our daily TiBH trivia questions on Facebook. Check us out at http://www.facebook.com/CharlesHWrightMuseum
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July 25, 2006 Carl Maxie Brashear, the first African American to become a United States Navy master diver, died. Brashear was born January 19, 1931 in Tonieville, Kentucky. He enlisted in the U. S. Navy in 1948. He graduated from the Navy Diving & Salvage School in 1954, the first African American navy diver.

July 2006 Carl Maxie Brashear was the first African American to become a United States Navy master diver. Brashear was born January 1931 in Tonieville, Kentucky. He enlisted in the U. Navy in He graduated from the Navy Diving & Salvage School in

Moses Fleetwood Walker was the first African American to play major league baseball in 1884

Moses Fleetwood Walker was the first African-American to play in major league baseball, 30 years before Jackie Robinson was even born. A catcher for the Toledo Bluestockings in

Dorothy Edwards Brunson was the first African American woman to own a radio station. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in business and finance from Empire State College. In 1973, Brunson joined the Inner City Broadcasting Company as general manager. She reduced staff, restructured the debt and bought another radio station. By 1978, the company had grown from $500,000 in annual revenue to $23 million in annual revenue with radio stations in seven major markets.

The talented tenth essay by web dubois W. And yet so sure as this Talented Tenth is pointed out, the blind worshippers of the Average cry out in alarm.

Channing E. Phillips, minister and social activist was the first African American placed in nomination for President of the United States by a major party.

Channing E. Phillips was the first Black person nominated to serve as a potential presidential candidate by a major political party. In August of Rev. Phillips was backed by the Washingt…

July 29, 1978 Keeth Thomas Smart, the first American to be named the top-ranked fencer internationally, was born in Brooklyn, New York.  In 2003, he became the first American to gain the sport’s number one international ranking. Smart competed at three Olympic Games, including the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games where he won a Silver medal as a member of the U. S. Sabre team, the first Olympic medal for a U. S. men’s team since 1948.

Wright Museum of African American History

August 15, 2002 Jesse Brown, the first African American to serve as United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs, died. In 1967, he joined the staff of Disabled American Veterans and in 1989 became the DAV’s first African American director. He served in that position until 1993 when he was selected by President William J. Clinton to become Secretary of Veterans Affairs. Brown served in that capacity until 1997.

August 2002 Jesse Brown, the first African American to serve as United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs, died.

Harry Tyson Moore, teacher and civil rights pioneer led the Progressive Voters League from 1944 to 1950 and during that time registered more than 100,000 Black people to vote.

Harry Tyson Moore, teacher and civil rights pioneer led the Progressive Voters League from 1944 to 1950 and during that time registered more than Black people to vote.

Branford Marsalis, saxophonist, composer, bandleader and educator,was nominated for the 2010 Tony Award for Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theater for the Broadway play “Fences.”

Branford Marsalis, saxophonist, composer, bandleader and educator,was nominated for the 2010 Tony Award for Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theater for the Broadway play “Fences.

In 1923, Smith was signed by Columbia Records as part of their “race records” series and she scored a hit with her first recording “Downhearted Blues” which sold 780,000 records in the first six months after release.

Bessie Smith: "The Queen of Blues" was one of the most successful Blues singers during its height in the and

August 28, 1955 Emmett Louis “Bobo” Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi for allegedly whistling at a White woman. Bryant and Milam were acquitted of murder by an all-White jury after 67 minutes of deliberation. In January, 1956, Look magazine published an interview in which Bryant and Milam admitted that they had murdered Till.

Remembering Emmett Till: The Horror of Lynching in America Emmett Louis Till (July 1941 – Aug. Emmett Till was

In 1990, Whoopie Goldberg, actress, comedienne and activist, became the first Black female to win the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in nearly 50 years.

In Whoopie Goldberg, actress, comedienne and activist, became the first Black female to win the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in nearly 50 years.

Hazel Dorothy Scott, jazz and classical pianist and singer was the first woman of color to have her own television show, “The Hazel Scott Show” which premiered July 3, 1950.

Hazel Dorothy Scott, jazz and classical pianist and singer was the first woman of color to have her own television show, “The Hazel Scott Show” which premiered July

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