Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas
from SlipTalk

The World Will Never Be The Same Because Of What These Women Did. This Took Serious Guts.


52 Powerful Photos Of Women Who Changed History Forever

Body artist turns her models into mind-bending animal illusions

“In the late 19th century it was a widely held belief that masturbation caused insanity and devices such as this were designed to prevent the wearer from touching or stimulating himself. They were often used in mental institutions and sometimes in the home” - Wellcome Images Sources: V, Wellcome Images

Retronaut - 1880-1920: Male Anti-Masturbation Devices

A box-bed is a bed enclosed in furniture that looks like a cupboard, half-opened or not.The box-bed is closed on all sides by panels of wood. One enters it by removing curtains, opening a door hinge or sliding doors on one or two slides. In front of the box-bed was often a large oaken chest, with the same length as the bed. This was the 'seat of honour,' and served also as a step for climbing into the bed. It was also used to store clothing, underwear and bedding the rest of the time

Pinned from

Sex & Sexuality in the 19th Century - Victoria and Albert Museum

110-year old reusable condoms made from fish bladder. At that time were reusable to an estimated amount of 10 times. Along with the original cardboard box with the maker’s label. The box's size was a 26 x 6 cm. The fish bladder condoms with its case sold for a whopping 2000 Euros at auction. There are signs of crosses on the packaging that may indicate how many times the condoms were used before by the owner. And if you look closely you can even find the manufacturer.

Antique Medicine - What weird stuff did our ancestors do?

In homes with usually only one room, the box-bed allowed some privacy and helped keep people warm during winter. It was the main furniture of rural houses in Brittany until the 20th century.

Pinned from

"Edward Mordrake was a 19th century English nobleman who had an extra face on the back of his head. According to the story, the extra face could neither eat nor speak, but it could laugh and cry. Edward begged doctors to have his ‘devil twin’ removed, because, supposedly, it whispered horrible things to him at night, but no doctor would attempt it. He committed suicide at the age of 23 by poisoning himself because he could no longer stand having to live with the face on the back of his…

The Curious Case of Edward Mordrake.