Discover and save creative ideas

    Work it!


    Work it!

    • 35 Pins

    Gwyneth speaks the truth

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    OK! It's March 1st and who's up for this challenge?

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Auuugh I need to start saying this to myself every morning when I post-pone working out.

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Great Glutes in 20 minutes

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    THIS IS WHAT HEALTHY LOOKS LIKE ... STRONG IS BEAUTIFUL! Visit us at: www.bobfranklin.u... and JOIN TEAM USANA TODAY!

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Spare 30 min?

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    No more love handles

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Just do it.

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    The Truth

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    12 weeks

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    MY BUTT PEOPLE.

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    - http://myfitmotiv.com - #myfitmotiv #fitness motivation #weight #loss #food #fitness #diet #gym #motivation..this was meant for me!

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Not all diet foods are created equal – some might even cause you to gain weight. Take the guesswork out of your diet with this comprehensive shopping list of Oz-approved diet foods.

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Drinking Water and Weight Loss by Maia Appleby Don't roll your eyes! The potion for losing that excess body fat is all around you. It covers two thirds of the planet. If you eat right and exercise at the intensity, frequency and duration proper for you, but still can't get rid of a little paunch here and there, you're probably just not drinking enough water. No need to get defensive. You're actually quite normal. Most people don't drink enough water. Most people are also carrying around a few more pounds than they would be if they did drink enough water. If you can't seem to get that weight off, try drowning your sorrows in nature's magical weight-loss mineral. It works, and here's why: "What on Earth is 'metabolism', anyway?" People use the term all the time, but ask them what it means and you'll get all kinds of answers. Merriam Webster defines it as, "The process by which a substance is handled in the body." A little vague, but that's really all it means. There are many forms of metabolism going on in your body right now, but the one everyone is talking about it the metabolism of fat. This is actually something that the liver does when it converts stored fat to energy. The liver has other functions, but this is one of its main jobs. Unfortunately, another of the liver's duties is to pick up the slack for the kidneys, which need plenty of water to work properly. If the kidneys are water-deprived, the liver has to do their work along with its own, lowering its total productivity. It then can't metabolize fat as quickly or efficiently as it could when the kidneys were pulling their own weight. If you allow this to happen, not only are you being unfair to your liver, but you're also setting yourself up to store fat. "I've tried it and I couldn't stand it!" The problem is that, though many decide to increase their water intake, very few stick with it. It's understandable. During the first few days of drinking more water than your body is accustomed to, you're running to the bathroom constantly. This can be very discouraging, and it can certainly interfere with an otherwise normal day at work. It seems that the water is coming out just as fast as it's going in, and many people decide that their new hydration habit is fruitless. Do take heed, though. What is really happening is that your body is flushing itself of the water it has been storing throughout all those years of "survival mode". It takes a while, but this is a beautiful thing happening to you. As you continue to give your body all the water it could ask for, it gets rid of what it doesn't need. It gets rid of the water it was holding onto in your ankles and your hips and thighs, maybe even around your belly. You are excreting much more than you realize. Your body figures it doesn't need to save these stores anymore; it's trusting that the water will keep coming, and if it does, eventually, the flushing (of both the body and the potty) will cease, allowing the human to return to a normal life. It's true. This is called the "breakthrough point". One recent finding, as irresponsible as it may be, that caffeine increases the body's fat-burning potential has many people loading up on coffee before going to the gym. This finding may hold some degree of truth in it, but caffeine is, in essence, a diuretic, and diuretics dehydrate. Caffeine may increase the heart rate, causing a few more calories to be burned, but this is at the expense of the muscles, which need water to function properly. This isn't doing your heart any favors, either. It's already working hard enough during your workout. Never mix caffeine and exercise. In fact, your best bet is to stay away from caffeine all together. It's a big bully that pushes your friend water out of your system. Water is the best beauty treatment. You've heard this since high school, and it's true. Water will do wonders for your looks! It flushes out impurities in your skin, leaving you with a clear, glowing complexion. It also makes your skin look younger. Skin that is becoming saggy, either due to aging or weight loss, plumps up very nicely when the skin cells are hydrated. In addition, it improves muscle tone. You can lift weights until you're blue in the face, but if your muscles are suffering from a drought, you won't notice a pleasant difference in your appearance. Muscles that have all the water they need contract more easily, making your workout more effective, and you'll look much nicer than if you had flabby muscles under sagging skin. "Eight glasses a day? Are you kidding?!" It's really not that much. Eight 8-ounce glasses amount to about two quarts of water. This is okay for the average person, but if you're overweight, you should drink another eight ounces for every 25 pounds of excess weight you carry. You should also up this if you live in a hot climate or exercise very intensely. This water consumption should be spread out throughout the day. It's not healthy at all to drink too much water at one time. Try to pick three or four times a day when you can have a big glass of water, and then sip in between. Don't let yourself get thirsty. If you feel thirsty, you're already becoming dehydrated. Drink when you're not thirsty yet. Do you think water is yucky? Drinking other fluids will certainly help hydrate your body, but the extra calories, sugar, additives and whatever else aren't what you need. Try a slice of lemon or lime in the glass, or if you really think you hate water, try a flavored water. Just make sure you read the labels. Remember that you're going to be consuming a lot of this fluid. It's probably a good idea to stop drinking water a good three hours before you go to bed. You know why. "How cold should it be?" This is debatable. Most experts lean toward cold water, because the stomach absorbs it more quickly. There is also some evidence that cold water might enhance fat burning. On the other hand, warmer water is easier to drink in large quantities, and you might drink more of it without even realizing it. Do whatever suits you, here. Just drink it! When you drink all the water you need, you will very quickly notice a decrease in your appetite, possibly even on the first day! If you're serious about becoming leaner and healthier, drinking water is an absolute must. If you're doing everything else right and still not seeing results, this might just be what's missing.

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Damn right!

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Beach time!

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    work it out!

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Both aerobics and strength-training offer many health and weight-loss benefits. Supporters of each tend to claim that their way is best, but the reality is that a balance of both makes for optimal fitness. You should not do both every day because the muscles you've worked out in strength-training require a day of rest afterward. But on days when you do engage in strength-training, you should do it first, before cardio or aerobic activity. Warm-Up If you are going to combine a day of weight or resistance training with a cardio workout, warm up first. You can stretch, walk briskly or anything else you prefer, as long as you warm your muscles prior to any strenuous activity. Try to devote 10 minutes to it. If you are out of shape and just starting an exercise program, you might break a sweat sooner than that, but try to maintain for at least five minutes. Strength Training If burning fat is your goal, you must strength-train before cardio. The nature of the activity -- intense, but in segments -- prompts your body to burn glucose or carbohydrates for energy. Resistance training also requires strength and stamina. If you do cardio first, you will deplete your body's glucose resources and have little strength left for the strength-training part of your program, according to Jim Beatty, a fitness and wellness coach in Wayne, Pennsylvania. Cardio Activity If you use up your body's glucose during weight-training, your body has no option but to burn fat to get you through aerobic exercise afterward. Cardio exercise burns a lot of fuel, so if you're trying to lose fat, this is a good thing. You'll feel it, however. Glucose is your body's preferred source of energy. It will resort to fat-burning only when it has no other choice. And burning fat takes more energy than burning glucose. Expect to feel an energy-drain toward the end of your aerobics session when you do strength-training first. You can avert this a little by limiting your strength training to 20 to 30 minutes.

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    A WH Fitness Face Off In one corner: Dumbbells. In the other: A jump rope. The ref: WH, slicing and dicing the research to determine whether strength or cardio rules. Liz Plosser Passat or Prius? Trader Joe's or Whole Foods? And when it comes to getting the body you want: strength training or cardio? Back when you carpooled in Ma's minivan, men went to the weight room and women hit Jazzercise. But recently, taking a cue from athletes, many fitness gurus insist that strength training is where it's at. Some even suggest ditching cardio altogether. To resolve the strength vs. cardio conundrum, we culled research and chatted up experts to find out how each would fare in a head-to-head matchup (don't worry, nobody's going to bite anyone's ear off). Whether you want to get buff, torch calories, or run your fastest mile ever, we've decoded which discipline you should devote your sweat to -- and created a workout that's perfectly proportioned to give you all the benefits. Now, let's get ready to rumble... To KO fat -- and keep it off... Cardio's edge Calorie for calorie, cardio has a slight advantage. You'll burn 8 to 10 calories a minute hoisting weights, compared with 10 to 12 calories a minute running or cycling, says Wayne Westcott, Ph.D., director of research at the South Shore YMCA in Quincy, Massachusetts. Strength's edge Lifting weights gives you a metabolic spike for an hour after a workout because your body is trying hard to help your muscles recover. That means you'll fry an additional 25 percent of the calories you just scorched during your strength session, Westcott says. "So if you burned 200 calories lifting weights, it's really closer to 250 overall." And if you lift heavier weights or rest no more than 30 seconds between sets, you can annihilate even more. And there's more good news when it comes to iron's fat-socking power. "For every 3 pounds of muscle you build, you'll burn an extra 120 calories a day -- just vegging -- because muscle takes more energy to sustain," Westcott says. Over the course of a year, that's about 10 pounds of fat -- without even changing your diet. Yes, please. Winner: Strength To squash stress... Cardio's edge The head-clearing effects of, say, swimming or playing tennis show up faster than it takes to get a brow wax. Just 15 minutes of aerobic activity two to three times a week can reduce anxiety significantly, according to a 2005 study in the European Journal of Sports Science. Go at it 3 to 5 days a week and you can cut fatigue by nearly 50 percent. "Cardio elevates serotonin levels in the brain, a key neurotransmitter involved in improving symptoms of depression," says Madhukar Trivedi, M.D., director of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Mood Disorders Research Program and Clinic. Strength's edge A big question mark. Scientists note promising results on the mood-altering effects of pumping iron. But more research is needed to nail the intensity and duration necessary to match cardio's benefits. So, for now Winner: Cardio To love standing naked in front of the mirror... Cardio's edge Sports psychologists have been studying the effect of aerobic activity on self-confidence for decades. And they keep coming to the same conclusion: Runners, cyclists, swimmers, and other athletes have high confidence levels because of the sense of accomplishment they feel each time they cross the finish line -- even when they bring up the rear. Strength's edge Think you look hot immediately after a workout? It's not your imagination. Blood has rushed to your muscles, making them swell and appear more toned. Beyond vanity, you feel confident because you just pressed some major poundage. In 2006, researchers at McMaster University in Ontario tested subjects' body image -- how they felt about others checking them out, and how satisfied they were with their own appearance before and after 12 weeks of strength training. The women made significant improvements, and they were particularly influenced by the physical results of increasing the amount lifted. So try this: Keep a log of how many sets and reps you complete and how much weight you're hoisting for each move. Every 4 weeks, go back and review your first workout. Feel the rush of pride, then strut your stuff. Winner: Strength To stay off the sideline: Cardio's edge [radio silence] The repetitive nature of cardio puts serious pressure on your joints, ligaments, muscles, tendons -- and the cartilage in between. If you've got a weak link, you're screaming to be benched. That is, unless you hit the weight room. Strength's edge In a 2006 study in the American Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers found that a balance-training program -- think single-leg squats and anything on a wobble board -- reduced the risk of ankle sprains in athletes. "Functional strength training teaches your brain to allow muscle contractions that are quick enough to prevent or minimize injuries," says lead study author Tim McGuine, Ph.D., senior athletic trainer and research coordinator at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Your best bet: Choose moves that work your core, improve your balance, and force you to bend at multiple joints -- so lunges, rows, squats, and presses are all fair game. Winner: Strength

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    plank work out

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Quickie

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Quickie

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Benefits of dry sauna and jaguzzi or steam baths: =Blood vessels become more flexible and there is increased circulation to the extremities. During a sauna, blood flow to the skin increases to as high as 50-70% of cardiac output (compared to the standard 5-10%). This brings nutrients to subcutaneous and surface tissue resulting in glowing healthy skin. =Steambaths and saunas induce sweating to provide a comprehensive cleansing of the skin and sweat glands. Skin is the largest organ in the body. 30% of body wastes are passed through the skin. Profuse sweating enhances the detoxifying capacity of the skin by opening pores and flushing impurities from the body. Thus, reduce and remove body toxins including nicotine, cholesterol; alcohol; sodium, and sulfuric acids. =When taking a sauna, skin temperature rises to 104°F (40°C) and internal body temperature rises to about 100.4°F (38°C). Exposure to the high heat creates an artificial fever state. Fever is part of the body's natural healing process. Fever stimulates the immune system which results in increased production of disease fighting white blood cells, antibodies and interferon (an anti viral protein with cancer fighting capability). Thus strengthening the immune system. =Spas and other such therapeutic facilities use saunas and steambaths in conjunction with massage to loosen fatty tissue and assist in the battle against cellulite. = Many regular steam and sauna users claim that a "good sweat" at the onset of a cold or flu helps relieve and ward off the most severe symptoms. Thus fights off winter colds with a strengthened immune system. Some of the other benefits associated with saunas and steambaths include: =Relief from the pain and stiffness of arthritis. =Treatment for respiratory problems, such as; chest congestion, bronchitis, laryngitis and sinusitis (especially steambaths). Improves lung function. =Revival of tired and strained muscles after physical exertion. Relax sore, tight and overworked muscles. =Healthy skin and a clear complexion from the cleansing effect of profuse perspiration. Refresh, deep clean and moisturizes your skin. = Burn calories to help control weight 30 min/day can burn up to 300-500 calories.. =Relieve daily STRESS and tension. = Induce a deeper and more relaxing sleep. =Strengthens your cardiovascular system by improving blood circulation and lowering blood pressure diastole.

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user

    Truth!

    Pinned from
    Uploaded by user