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Precolumbian terracotta heads & figurines

A part of these Pre-columbian Maya heads and figurines came from a collection from the Dutch adventurer/explorer prof. dr. Anthonie Stolk. He claimed he had discovered an ancient city of the Chibcha indians in the Amazon jungle.
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Ancient Mayan, Stucco Portrait Head, AD 550-850

ANCIENT ART

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| fabionardini: Mayan death mask, Palenque, Mexico...

| fabionardini: Mayan death mask, Palenque, Mexico...

paqomedicine.tumblr.com

Male head with hat

Male head with hat -

art.famsf.org

lu-k-h: “Visage d’homme. Mexique (600-900 apr.J.-C.) ”

FRANSWAZZ

franswazz.tumblr.com

Head of Maize Goddess (?) | Dallas Museum of Art

Head of Maize Goddess (?)

dma.org

Mayan Fire God

Mayan Fire God

corbisimages.com

Pre-Columbian Photo Archive | Merrin Gallery

Pre-Columbian Photo Archive

merringallery.com

Stone Head Maya, Classic period (AD 250-900)From Copán, Honduras The ancient Maya city of Copán is renowned for the large number of elaborate three-dimensional stone sculptures, scattered over the site. It attracted the attention of early travellers such as John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood, who published images of some of the monuments in Incidents of travel in Central America, Chiapas and Yucatan in 1841. In 1881, another great traveller and pioneer of Maya archaeology, Alfred…

Ancient Peoples

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Stucco portrait headMaya heartland. 550 AD to 850 AD. A fundamental feature of Mesoamerican formal architecture was the use of molded, modeled, and carved stucco decoration. Painted either monochrome red or in a variety of colors, these façades narrated key precepts of religio-political ideology, displaying the supernatural patrons and worldly authority of the aristocracy that used the structures. The façade decoration also could reveal a building’s function as well as its symbolic id...

tlatollotl

tlatollotl.tumblr.com

Stucco portrait headCampeche, Mexico. Maya. 550 AD to 850 AD A fundamental feature of Mesoamerican formal architecture was the use of molded, modeled, and carved stucco decoration. Painted either monochrome red or in a variety of colors, these façades narrated key precepts of religio-political ideology, displaying the supernatural patrons and worldly authority of the aristocracy that used the structures. The façade decoration also could reveal a building’s function as well as its symb...

tlatollotl

tlatollotl.tumblr.com

the M!RROR in the tree

leradr

leradr.tumblr.com

Teotihuacan, ancient Mexico, c. 200 - 650 AD. Excellent and HUGE molded terracotta head from a statue. With sensitively sculpted features and elaborate headdress.

Teotihuacan, Mexico. Pre-Aztec Teotihuanaca Artifacts for Sale

ancientresource.com

Palenque Museum | by mayaportrait

Palenque Museum

flickr.com

Palenque Museum | by mayaportrait

Palenque Museum

flickr.com

Palenque Museum | by mayaportrait

Palenque Museum

flickr.com

Palenque Museum | by mayaportrait

Palenque Museum

flickr.com

Wizened Mask - MIHO MUSEUM

Wizened Mask

miho.jp

Totonac Sculpted Heads

Totonac Sculpted Heads

latinamericanstudies.org

Maya Figurines Preclassic Period 1800 BCE-250 CE

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flickr.com

Urn Figure Head Fragment, c. 200-500 Mexico, Oaxaca, Zapotec

Urn Figure Head Fragment

clevelandart.org

Mayan Terracotta Sculpture of a Head - Origin: Mexico Circa: 500 AD to 900 AD Dimensions: 5.75 (14.6cm) high Collection: Pre-Columbian Medium: Terracotta

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barakatgallery.com

Mayan Half Skull/Half Face Mask - Guatemala - 6th-9th century AD

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barakatgallery.com

Maya Stucco Head,. Late Classic, ca. A.D. 550-950

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bonhams.com

Human head broken from a figurine. "Coffee-bead"-shaped eyes recall many figurine types from the Valley of Mexico and surrounding Central Highlands. Preclassic Mexico 1200 - 500 BC

Human effigy head | MFA for Educators

educators.mfa.org

Head from a Figure Date: 7th–8th century Geography: Mexico, Mesoamerica Culture: Maya Medium: Ceramic MET

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metmuseum.org