Trickle Up

Trickle Up

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New York HQ, India, Mali, Burkina Faso, Guatemala, Nicaragua  ·  Trickle Up provides women living in extreme poverty – on less than $1.25 a day – with the tools to build livelihoods that grow their income, skills and self-con
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Women are a powerful force in ending extreme poverty. Each year, Trickle Up helps thousands of women in Central America, India and West Africa escape extreme poverty by providing the tools they need to start businesses, learn new skills and build a better future. In their savings circles the women strengthen their finances, learn to improve their family’s health and empower one another to speak up at home and in their communities. Support more…

Women are a powerful force in ending extreme poverty. Each year, Trickle Up helps thousands of women in Central America, India and West Africa escape extreme poverty by providing the tools they need to start businesses, learn new skills and build a better future. In their savings circles the women strengthen their finances, learn to improve their family’s health and empower one another to speak up at home and in their communities. Support more…

Trickle Up participants like Lilia Marina from Guatemala give back to their communities once they begin their journeys out of extreme poverty.

Trickle Up participants like Lilia Marina from Guatemala give back to their communities once they begin their journeys out of extreme poverty.

Through your continued support of Trickle Up, communities in some of the poorest parts of the world can now look forward to brighter futures.     Happy Holidays.    With gratitude and friendship,   All of us at Trickle Up

Through your continued support of Trickle Up, communities in some of the poorest parts of the world can now look forward to brighter futures. With gratitude and friendship, All of us at Trickle Up

"While working with the poorest is more difficult and resource intensive,  when change does happen it tends t be more significant."     Read The Poverty Paradox by Trickle Up's Jo Sanson, and learn why: http://www.trickleup.org/media/publications/povertyparadox/The-Poverty-Paradox.cfm    (Published in InterAction's Monthly Developments September 2012 Issue)

"While working with the poorest is more difficult and resource intensive, when change does happen it tends t be more significant." Read The Poverty Paradox by Trickle Up's Jo Sanson, and learn why: http://www.trickleup.org/media/publications/povertyparadox/The-Poverty-Paradox.cfm (Published in InterAction's Monthly Developments September 2012 Issue)

"While working with the poorest is more difficult and resource intensive,  when change does happen it tends t be more significant."     Read The Poverty Paradox by Trickle Up's Director of Monitoring & Evaluation Jo Sanson, and learn why: http://www.trickleup.org/media/publications/povertyparadox/The-Poverty-Paradox.cfm

"While working with the poorest is more difficult and resource intensive, when change does happen it tends t be more significant." Read The Poverty Paradox by Trickle Up's Director of Monitoring & Evaluation Jo Sanson, and learn why: http://www.trickleup.org/media/publications/povertyparadox/The-Poverty-Paradox.cfm

Magdalena Tambriz Cuc de Xolcaja

Magdalena Tambriz Cuc de Xolcaja

An example of traditional back-strap weaving by Magdalena Tambriz Cuc de Xolcaja.

An example of traditional back-strap weaving by Magdalena Tambriz Cuc de Xolcaja.

Magdalena, the first participant we met set the stage for the whole trip. Inspiring is an understatement. Forced to stay home most of her life because of the stigma her family associated with her disability, Magdalena now has an ambitious plan for her future: weave to make enough money to hire an assistant to help her sell fried goods at local soccer games ~ a lucrative business venture given the passion Guatemalans have for the game!

Magdalena, the first participant we met set the stage for the whole trip. Inspiring is an understatement. Forced to stay home most of her life because of the stigma her family associated with her disability, Magdalena now has an ambitious plan for her future: weave to make enough money to hire an assistant to help her sell fried goods at local soccer games ~ a lucrative business venture given the passion Guatemalans have for the game!

Arriving for our first participant visit in the village of Nahuala, we were immediately overwhelmed with girls and boys out of school. Perplexed, we quickly discovered it was International Children's Day and the schoolchildren were waiting for clown entertainers to arrive so they can get the party started!

Arriving for our first participant visit in the village of Nahuala, we were immediately overwhelmed with girls and boys out of school. Perplexed, we quickly discovered it was International Children's Day and the schoolchildren were waiting for clown entertainers to arrive so they can get the party started!

Guatemala is a very mountainous country, and that means lots of driving on windy, steep and bumpy roads. At least we have spectacular scenery to keep us company. Because Trickle Up works with the poorest and most marginalized, this often translates to people who live in remote, rural areas. Learn more: http://www.trickleup.org/poverty/rural-poverty.cfm

Guatemala is a very mountainous country, and that means lots of driving on windy, steep and bumpy roads. At least we have spectacular scenery to keep us company. Because Trickle Up works with the poorest and most marginalized, this often translates to people who live in remote, rural areas. Learn more: http://www.trickleup.org/poverty/rural-poverty.cfm

First day and we're already on the road! Guatemala is a very mountainous country, and that means lots of driving on windy, steep and bumpy roads. At least we have spectacular scenery to keep us company.    Because Trickle Up works with the poorest and most marginalized, this often translates to people who live in remote, rural areas. Learn more: http://www.trickleup.org/poverty/rural-poverty.cfm

First day and we're already on the road! Guatemala is a very mountainous country, and that means lots of driving on windy, steep and bumpy roads. At least we have spectacular scenery to keep us company. Because Trickle Up works with the poorest and most marginalized, this often translates to people who live in remote, rural areas. Learn more: http://www.trickleup.org/poverty/rural-poverty.cfm

The Women of Sampara Village in Mali, West Africa.

The Women of Sampara Village in Mali, West Africa.

A Trickle Up participant from Guatemala with her baby.

A Trickle Up participant from Guatemala with her baby.

Hadi Amin, a Trickle Up participant from India, with her son and goats.

Hadi Amin, a Trickle Up participant from with her son and the two baby goats that she bought with her Spark Grant.

Trickle Up West African participant and her food stand.

Trickle Up West African participant and her food stand.

As part of Trickle Up’s Stronger Voices, Sustainable Livelihoods project, Trickle Up participants in Mali annually celebrate the UN-sponsored International Day for People with Disabilities.

As part of Trickle Up’s Stronger Voices, Sustainable Livelihoods project, Trickle Up participants in Mali annually celebrate the UN-sponsored International Day for People with Disabilities.