Udell Animal Behavior

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Corvallis Oregon  ·  A resource for learning about animal behavior and cognition through images, video, and words- compiled by Animal Behavior students at Oregon State University.
Udell Animal Behavior
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Improving Technology with.... Octopuses? Octopuses are known for their ability to change their appearance rapidly, a behavior important to their foraging and anti-predation strategies. Octopuses that use color changing camouflage to blend in with their surroundings do so by reflecting ambient light from their environment (the colors are not produced from within)- to learn how (and what this could mean for technology like the kindle) click the image!

Predator or prey? One of the most widespread and varied adaptations is natural camouflage, an animal’s ability to hide itself.

A unique link between birds and arthropods! Scientists have discovered that Club-winged Manakins produce mate attracting songs by rubbing their wings together (at 100 cycles per second)! This creates audible sound producing vibrations - much like a cricket song. This is the first evidence of a bird producing sound in this way, but scientists say more species may be capable of this previously undiscovered behavior! To learn more click the image and then go here: http://www.singingwings.org/

November club-winged manakins vibrate their wings to create violin-like sounds to impress females, a new study says.

The star nose mole is named after a bright pink star-like appendage located around its snout area. Despite the name, this structure is not used for olfaction. Instead it is an incredibly sensitive tactile organ used to find food. Although the entire star is smaller than the human fingertip, it is thought to have more touch receptors than an entire human hand.  To learn more click the image!

A resident of North America, this star-nosed mole makes up for his poor eyesight with a hairless nose that is a "star" of 22 fleshy tentacles. The tentacles are extremely sensitive - they can even sense electricity!

A unique link between birds and arthropods! Scientists have discovered that Club-winged Manakins produce mate attracting songs by rubbing their wings together (at 100 cycles per second)! This creates audible sound producing vibrations - much like a cricket song. This is the first evidence of a bird producing sound in this way, but scientists say more species may be capable of this previously undiscovered behavior! To learn more click the image and then go here: http://www.singingwings.org/

November club-winged manakins vibrate their wings to create violin-like sounds to impress females, a new study says.

Improving Technology with.... Octopuses? Octopuses are known for their ability to change their appearance rapidly, a behavior important to their foraging and anti-predation strategies. Octopuses that use color changing camouflage to blend in with their surroundings do so by reflecting ambient light from their environment (the colors are not produced from within)- to learn how (and what this could mean for technology like the kindle) click the image!

Predator or prey? One of the most widespread and varied adaptations is natural camouflage, an animal’s ability to hide itself.

While there have been many reports of social hierarchies in female elephants, male elephants may also form hierarchies when resources- like water- are limited. Research has found that in periods of drought male elephants can form stable hierarchies that predict access to and usage of water holes, despite the fact that these relationships are not obvious in wetter seasons. Such hierarchies help reduce true aggression and risk of injury within a population.

Bull elephants are not all loners - some form close-knit hierarchies that vary with the rainfall, Stanford researchers say

The star nose mole is named after a bright pink star-like appendage located around its snout area. Despite the name, this structure is not used for olfaction. Instead it is an incredibly sensitive tactile organ used to find food. Although the entire star is smaller than the human fingertip, it is thought to have more touch receptors than an entire human hand.  To learn more click the image!

A resident of North America, this star-nosed mole makes up for his poor eyesight with a hairless nose that is a "star" of 22 fleshy tentacles. The tentacles are extremely sensitive - they can even sense electricity!