Awesome Women in History


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Awesome Women in History

Awesome Women in History

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Amy Johnson, English aviator 1903-1941 One of the first women to gain a pilot's licence, Johnson won fame when she flew solo from Britain to Australia in 1930. Her dangerous flight took 17 days. Later she flew solo to India and Japan and became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic East to West, she volunteered to fly for The Women's Auxiialry Air Force in WW2, but her plane was shot down over the River Thames and she was killed

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All-American Girls Professional Baseball League - established 1943, as many men's minor league teams were disbanded due to the war.

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Claressa Shields first gold medalist in Woman's boxing

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Travers was (and is) the only woman to have been a member of the French Foreign Legion. Travers is also a recipient of the Legion d’Honneur, the Medaille Militaire, and the Croix de Guerre, which are among France’s highest honors for military service

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Victoria Woodhull Woodhull was an advocate of free love, by which she meant the freedom to marry, divorce, and bear children without government interference. She was the first woman to start a weekly newspaper; an activist for women's rights and labor reforms. In 1872, she was the first woman candidate for President of the United States.

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Charlotte Cooper (tennis) first woman to win an olympic metal in tenis in the 1900 summer olympics in Paris, France.

Charlotte Cooper (tennis) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org

First-ever Olympic Medals awarded to women boxers. 10/08/2012 Nicola Adams from Great Britain, Katie Taylor from Ireland and Claressa Shields from the USA have won the first-ever Olympic gold medals in women’s boxing in the categories of fly weight (51kg), light weight (60 kg) and middle weight (75 kg) respectively.

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Shannon Eastin, the NFL's first female official

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DORIS SAMS, WOMEN’S BASEBALL STAR AND LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN INSPIRATION, DIES AT 85. Sams joined the league just after the war, in 1946, remained there for eight years, and was named Player of the Year twice–once in 1947, when she pitched a perfect game. She played for the Lassies, a Michigan team based first in Muskegon and then Kalamazoo. In her eight-year career Sams made the all-star team five times, both as a pitcher and outfielder.

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c. 1920 Suffrage Flyer MHS Collections. (via Missouri History Museum)

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First time ever, more women than men will represent the United States. Amy Acuff (track and field); Khatuna Lorig (archery); Emil Milev (shooting); Karen O’Connor (equestrian); Kim Rhode (shooting); and Danielle Scott-Arruda (indoor volleyball) are all 5-time Olympiads, a rare title held by only 24 athletes in total. America’s oldest athlete is 54-year-old equestrian champ O’Connor, and our youngest is 15-year-old swimmer Katie Ledecky, and 13 mothers will compete for the gold.

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Helen Gibson (August 27, 1892 – October 10, 1977) was an American film actress, vaudeville performer, radio performer, film producer, trick rider and rodeo performer; and is considered to be the first American professional stunt woman

Helen Gibson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org

MEET SARAH ROBLES, AMERICA’S STRONGEST WOMAN AND BODY IMAGE ACTIVIST

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Good Problems

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Wilma Rudolph -- The first woman to win three medals in a single Olympics, Wilma Rudolph was dubbed "The Tornado" after her track and field performance during the 1960 Rome Olympics. Even more amazingly, Rudolph suffered from Polio as a child and, according to the Examiner, " surprised everyone when she removed her braces and walked across the room five years after her diagnosis. Here she is completing a 50-yard dash in 1961 at Madison Square Garden. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-USZ6

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Althea Gibson was a phenomenon -- and the number-one ranked U.S. women's tennis player in 1957 and 1958. She broke huge racial barriers in sports, becoming the first African-American to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. And after she was done with tennis, Gibson took up pro golf, becoming the first African-American woman aboard the LPGA. She was inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame in 1971. Here, Gibson is pictured playing in Forest Hills, N.Y. in 1957.

The Maude - Ladies. Bits.

thejanedough.com

Meet some of the first female space explorers. (via LiveScience)

Female Space Explorers (Infographic)

livescience.com

The Mother of Title IX: Trailblazing Athlete Eleonora Sears. Back in the early 1900s, Eleonora Sears ice-skated, shot rifles, rode horses, and raced yachts. She excelled in 19 sports, making her America’s most versatile female athlete. And—horrors—she wore pants.

The Mother of Title IX: Trailblazing Athlete Eleonora Sears

thedailybeast.com

China's first woman in astronaut, Liu Yang. 29th anniversary of Sally Ride’s first space mission -June 18, 1983 she became not just the first woman from the U.S. but also the youngest American ever in space.

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The Los Angeles Dodgers' Sue Falsone is the first woman to hold the title of head athletic trainer in major professional sports.

Meet L.A.'s Sue Falsone: only female head trainer in pro sports

sportsillustrated.cnn.com

Kate Warne, a Pinkerton Detective and America’s first woman detective discovers and acts as a body guard for President Lincoln.

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cia.gov

Marie Curie: Great Minds

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In developing the Girl Scout movement in the United States, Juliette brought girls of all backgrounds into the out-of-doors, giving them the opportunity to develop self-reliance and resourcefulness.

History | Juliette Gordon Low Biography

girlscouts.org

Evelyn Bryan Johnson who went by the nickname “Mama Bird,” held the record for the most hours in the air by a female pilot. Johnson was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 2007 after flying for 55 years and spending the equivalent of seven years in the air,” writes Philly.com. “She was estimated to have flown 5.5 million miles — equal to 23 trips to the moon — and never had a crash despite her share of mechanical troubles in the sky.”

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