Bureau of Reclamation

Bureau of Reclamation

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Reclamation is the largest wholesale water supplier and the second largest producer of hydroelectric power in the United States, with operations and facilities
Bureau of Reclamation
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Federal Ranger force, Boulder Canyon Reservation, Boulder Canyon Project. Nov 9,1934. #TBT #throwbackthursday

Federal Ranger force, Boulder Canyon Reservation, Boulder Canyon Project. Nov 9,1934. #TBT #throwbackthursday

Meet "Holly," one of the newest four-legged members of the Hoover Dam Police Department's K-9 Unit. Holly is a bomb detection dog in training, partnered with K-9 handler and Police Officer Laura Steele.   In an upcoming article, Reclamation will discuss the Hoover Dam Police Department's K-9 Police Dog Program and its special mission to protect and serve the public. Stay with us to learn more! #HooverDam #policedogs

Meet "Holly," one of the newest four-legged members of the Hoover Dam Police Department's K-9 Unit. Holly is a bomb detection dog in training, partnered with K-9 handler and Police Officer Laura Steele. In an upcoming article, Reclamation will discuss the Hoover Dam Police Department's K-9 Police Dog Program and its special mission to protect and serve the public. Stay with us to learn more! #HooverDam #policedogs

Small herd of Bighorn Sheep found within the Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. This group lives on and near Whitestone Rock,WA. Photo by Craig Brougher, Hydrologic Technician with the Bureau of Reclamation, Grand Coulee Power Office. #wildlifewednesday

Small herd of Bighorn Sheep found within the Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. This group lives on and near Whitestone Rock,WA. Photo by Craig Brougher, Hydrologic Technician with the Bureau of Reclamation, Grand Coulee Power Office.

Is this beaver inspecting man’s attempt to build a dam at Grand Coulee? Hopefully, he was impressed! #motivatedmonday #GrandCouleeDam  Photo by Craig Brougher, Hydrologic Technician with the Bureau of Reclamation, Grand Coulee Power Office.

Is this beaver inspecting man’s attempt to build a dam at Grand Coulee? Hopefully, he was impressed! Photo by Craig Brougher, Hydrologic Technician with the Bureau of Reclamation, Grand Coulee Power Office.

Colorado River downstream of the Cibola National Wildlife Refuge, AZ. Reclamation file photo. #scenic

Colorado River downstream of the Cibola National Wildlife Refuge, AZ.

Jackhammer crews operating on Hungry Horse damsite abutment. Reclamation file photo. #TBT #throwbackthursday

Jackhammer crews operating on Hungry Horse damsite abutment.

Lupines at Folsom Lake, CA. Photo by Alisha Daniel, Mid-Pacific Region photo contest, 2015. #sunriseandsunsets

Lupines at Folsom Lake, CA. Photo by Alisha Daniel, Mid-Pacific Region photo contest,

Women feeding antelope near Hoover Dam, NV. Reclamation file photo, exact date unknown. #TBT #throwbackthursday

Women feeding antelope near Hoover Dam, NV. Reclamation file photo, exact date unknown.

Woman petting an antelope near Hoover Dam, NV. Reclamation file photo, exact date unknown. #TBT #throwbackthursday

Woman petting an antelope near Hoover Dam, NV. Reclamation file photo, exact date unknown.

The big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, is considered large for an American bat. They have brown to glossy copper-colored fur on their back and a light-colored belly. They have small black ears that are rounded, their lips are fleshy, and they have a broad nose. These tough creatures can withstand conditions that other bat species cannot. They are found in the northern parts of Canada, the United States, Mexico, Central America, northern South America, and the Caribbean Islands.

The big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, is considered large for an American bat. They have brown to glossy copper-colored fur on their back and a light-colored belly. They have small black ears that are rounded, their lips are fleshy, and they have a broad nose. These tough creatures can withstand conditions that other bat species cannot. They are found in the northern parts of Canada, the United States, Mexico, Central America, northern South America, and the Caribbean Islands.

The California Myotis, Myotis californicus, is a species of vesper bat. They have pale, dull fur, a small foot, short forearm, and a relatively long tail. Their ears are medium sized—extending slightly beyond their snout when laid forward. They are inhabitants of wooded canyons, open deciduous and coniferous forests, and brushy hillsides. They can be found in in British Columbia in Canada, Guatemala, Mexico, and western United States.

The California Myotis, Myotis californicus, is a species of vesper bat. They have pale, dull fur, a small foot, short forearm, and a relatively long tail. Their ears are medium sized—extending slightly beyond their snout when laid forward. They are inhabitants of wooded canyons, open deciduous and coniferous forests, and brushy hillsides. They can be found in in British Columbia in Canada, Guatemala, Mexico, and western United States.

The Arizona Myotis, Myotis occultus, is a medium-sized bat with brown or black fur on its back and paler fur on its underside. Its ears are short and pointed and its eyes are small. They prefer a cave habitat, but will choose other roosting areas if a suitable cave is not available. These bats are found in the southwestern United States, Arizona, extreme southeast California, Mexico and Central America.

The Arizona Myotis, Myotis occultus, is a medium-sized bat with brown or black fur on its back and paler fur on its underside. Its ears are short and pointed and its eyes are small. They prefer a cave habitat, but will choose other roosting areas if a suitable cave is not available. These bats are found in the southwestern United States, Arizona, extreme southeast California, Mexico and Central America.

Known predators of the western yellow bat include domestic cats and dogs and barn owls. Predators of other foliage roosting bats include birds of prey, roadrunners, and opossums. Woodpeckers and raccoons have been observed disturbing other tree-roosting species at their roosting sites. The use of pesticide threatens both bats and their insect prey. The major threat to most bat species is the loss of habitat, including open water, which degrades roosting and foraging areas.

Known predators of the western yellow bat include domestic cats and dogs and barn owls. Predators of other foliage roosting bats include birds of prey, roadrunners, and opossums. Woodpeckers and raccoons have been observed disturbing other tree-roosting species at their roosting sites. The use of pesticide threatens both bats and their insect prey. The major threat to most bat species is the loss of habitat, including open water, which degrades roosting and foraging areas.

The western yellow bat is a medium to large-sized bat with yellowish-buff to light brownish fur, tipped with gray or white. This species’ wingspan ranges from 13-14 inches, its ears are shorter than many other species, but their length is larger than their width. The anterior half of skin between the legs is well-furred, while the posterior half is bare or almost bare. Western yellow bats feed on a variety of insects including ants, wasps, bees, flies, mosquitoes, butterflies, moths…

The western yellow bat is a medium to large-sized bat with yellowish-buff to light brownish fur, tipped with gray or white. This species’ wingspan ranges from 13-14 inches, its ears are shorter than many other species, but their length is larger than their width. The anterior half of skin between the legs is well-furred, while the posterior half is bare or almost bare. Western yellow bats feed on a variety of insects including ants, wasps, bees, flies, mosquitoes, butterflies, moths…

Reclamation Participates in Spring Wings Bird Festival in Fallon, Nevada.

Reclamation Participates in Spring Wings Bird Festival in Fallon, Nevada.

Reclamation Participates in Spring Wings Bird Festival in Fallon, Nevada.

Reclamation Participates in Spring Wings Bird Festival in Fallon, Nevada.