Resources for Educators

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Find resources from the National Archives for educators, including teachers, librarians, homeschooling parents, and curriculum coordinators. We include lesson plans, classroom activities, online teaching tools, eBooks, primary source sets, and other useful educational resources. Learn more at https://www.docsteach.org and https://www.archives.gov/education

US National Archives
Women's History Month
Bill Of Rights
Native American History
NASA and Space Exploration
National History Day 2019
African American History Month
eBooks from the National Archives
Other Pins

Women's History Month

Explore diverse stories of women who pushed the limits of what was expected and accepted of them.

Learn About Women Who Pushed Boundaries

Explore diverse stories of women who pushed the limits of what was expected and accepted of them.

Historically a woman’s citizenship status in the United States was linked to the man she married. Legislation over the years solidified and then changed this practice.

Learn About the History of Women's Citizenship Rights

Historically a woman’s citizenship status in the United States was linked to the man she married. Legislation over the years solidified and then changed this practice.

Anti-suffragists formed organizations to resist a federal women’s suffrage amendment. Some argued, among other reasons, that involvement in politics would change family roles; others believed it was a decision best left to the states.

Learn About the Anti-Suffrage Movement

Anti-suffragists formed organizations to resist a federal women’s suffrage amendment. Some argued, among other reasons, that involvement in politics would change family roles; others believed it was a decision best left to the states.

Find images of parades, marches, protests, and picketing the White House.

Photos of Protests and Suffrage Activities

Find images of parades, marches, protests, and picketing the White House.

Read documents sent to Congress and others in support of women’s suffrage – from individuals, organizations, and suffrage associations around the country.

Petitions and Letters About Women's History

Read documents sent to Congress and others in support of women’s suffrage – from individuals, organizations, and suffrage associations around the country.

This lesson uses primary sources from the Center for Legislative Archives and the National Archives to engage students in studying the Progressive Era issue of woman suffrage. It features petitions, correspondence, and legislative records sent to Congress as it debated suffrage prior to passage of the 19th Amendment.

Woman’s Place in America: Congress and Woman Suffrage

This lesson uses primary sources from the Center for Legislative Archives and the National Archives to engage students in studying the Progressive Era issue of woman suffrage. It features petitions, correspondence, and legislative records sent to Congress as it debated suffrage prior to passage of the 19th Amendment.

In this activity, students will examine one way that Susan B. Anthony and other suffragists fought for the right to vote.

Suffragist Susan B. Anthony: Petitioning for the Right to Vote- Focusing on Details: Spotlight

In this activity, students will examine one way that Susan B. Anthony and other suffragists fought for the right to vote.

In this activity, students will analyze historical records of Congress and the U.S. Government to understand the sequence of steps in the amendment process. Students will study each document and match it to the step in the process that it illustrates.   When put in proper sequence, the documents will show the process by which the 19th Amendment – prohibiting the Federal Government or states from denying the right to vote on the basis of sex – was added to the Constitution.

The Amendment Process: Ratifying the 19th Amendment- Finding a Sequence

In this activity, students will analyze historical records of Congress and the U.S. Government to understand the sequence of steps in the amendment process. Students will study each document and match it to the step in the process that it illustrates. When put in proper sequence, the documents will show the process by which the 19th Amendment – prohibiting the Federal Government or states from denying the right to vote on the basis of sex – was added to the Constitution.

This lesson uses primary sources from the Center for Legislative Archives and the National Archives to engage students in studying the Progressive Era issue of woman suffrage. It features petitions, correspondence, and legislative records sent to Congress as it debated suffrage prior to passage of the 19th Amendment.

Woman’s Place in America: Congress and Woman Suffrage

This lesson uses primary sources from the Center for Legislative Archives and the National Archives to engage students in studying the Progressive Era issue of woman suffrage. It features petitions, correspondence, and legislative records sent to Congress as it debated suffrage prior to passage of the 19th Amendment.

Students will explore records from the U.S. House of Representatives to discover the story of Harriet Tubman’s Civil War service to the government and her petition to Congress for compensation.

Lesson Plans: Congress and Harriet Tubman's Claim for a Pension (Congress in History)

Students will explore records from the U.S. House of Representatives to discover the story of Harriet Tubman’s Civil War service to the government and her petition to Congress for compensation.

This activity requires students to examine the arrest record of an un-named person. Students will analyze and evaluate the data contained in the document, applying prior knowledge, to discern what happened in the incident and the identity of the person involved. It is Rosa Parks, but her name has been blacked out in the activity.

Examining Rosa Parks's Arrest Record - Focusing on Details

This activity requires students to examine the arrest record of an un-named person. Students will analyze and evaluate the data contained in the document, applying prior knowledge, to discern what happened in the incident and the identity of the person involved. It is Rosa Parks, but her name has been blacked out in the activity.

n this activity, students will explore the struggle for universal suffrage long after both men and women constitutionally had the right to vote. Following a progressive timeline, primary sources highlight voting problems which arose for minority groups throughout the 20th century. Students will answer questions as they work through the documents to reflect on if and when universal suffrage was ultimately achieved.

The 19th Amendment and the Road to Universal Suffrage- Making Connections

n this activity, students will explore the struggle for universal suffrage long after both men and women constitutionally had the right to vote. Following a progressive timeline, primary sources highlight voting problems which arose for minority groups throughout the 20th century. Students will answer questions as they work through the documents to reflect on if and when universal suffrage was ultimately achieved.

Historical documents and a script that the National Archives commissioned about the decades long struggle entitled Failure is Impossible serve as valuable teaching tools.

Woman Suffrage and the 19th Amendment

Historical documents and a script that the National Archives commissioned about the decades long struggle entitled Failure is Impossible serve as valuable teaching tools.

This short comparative analysis activity involves comparing and contrasting two images of marches for freedom: a 1917 a Bastille Day march for women's suffrage, and the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Students will consider the similarities and differences between these two images and hypothesize what major differences these photos might imply about the two social reform movements.

The Suffrage and the Civil Rights Reform Movements - Compare and Contrast

This short comparative analysis activity involves comparing and contrasting two images of marches for freedom: a 1917 a Bastille Day march for women's suffrage, and the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Students will consider the similarities and differences between these two images and hypothesize what major differences these photos might imply about the two social reform movements.

In this activity, students will analyze documents pertaining to the woman suffrage movement as it intensified following passage of the 15th Amendment that guaranteed the right to vote for African American males. Documents were chosen to call attention to the struggle’s length, the movement’s techniques, and the variety of arguments for and against giving women the vote.

Extending Suffrage to Women- Finding a Sequence

In this activity, students will analyze documents pertaining to the woman suffrage movement as it intensified following passage of the 15th Amendment that guaranteed the right to vote for African American males. Documents were chosen to call attention to the struggle’s length, the movement’s techniques, and the variety of arguments for and against giving women the vote.

Bill Of Rights

Analyzing the 5th Amendment Right Against Self-Incrimination

Analyzing the 5th Amendment Right Against Self-Incrimination

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution.  This eBook, created by us at the National Archives, is useful for teaching about the creation of the Bill of Rights and for how the protections afforded by the first 10 amendments have been put to the test over the course of our nation’s history.

Bill of Rights Day

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. These two eBooks, created by us at the National Archives, are useful for …

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution.  This eBooks, created by us at the National Archives, is useful for teaching about the creation of the Bill of Rights and for how the protections afforded by the first 10 amendments have been put to the test over the course of our nation’s history.

Bill of Rights Day

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, which commemorates the ratification of the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. These two eBooks, created by us at the National Archives, are useful for …

After the House of Representatives passed 17 Constitutional amendments that James Madison had proposed, the Senate took up the matter. This document shows handwritten revisions by Senators to the House list, cutting it to 12 amendments by combining and deleting items.  The document shows that the Bill of Rights didn’t spring fully formed from Madison’s head, but was instead a product of debate and compromise in the first Congress.

New on DocsTeach: War & Protest Photos, Alexander Hamilton, the Bill of Rights and More

Recent highlights of primary sources newly added to DocsTeach

From Dred Scott to the Civil Rights Act of 1875   In this activity, students will examine sequential primary sources relating to the events that led to this change and write eight short descriptions explaining the relationships between the historical events.

From Dred Scott to the Civil Rights Act of 1875

In this activity, students will analyze a search warrant that was issued during the Prohibition era to determine if it fulfills all of the necessary requirements outlined in the Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution. Students will later write a search warrant that would have made the evidence seized in the case of Weeks v. United States admissible in court.

Search Warrants and the 4th Amendment

In this activity for upper elementary grades, school students will analyze primary sources and match them with the rights extended to Americans by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

The First Amendment of the Bill of Rights

Native American History

Through DocsTeach, choose from thousands of primary sources for use in classroom activities. This pin links directly to Native American primary sources.

Documents

En esta actividad, los estudiantes examinarán de cerca una serie de imágenes del asentamiento Tsimshian de Metlakahtla, Alaska. Identificarán evidencia de asimilación cultural que la comunidad experimentó como parte de su conversión a la fe anglicana. Por último, se les pedira que expresen una opinión acerca de sí o si nó tal asimilación cultural y dramática es beneficiosa o perjudicial para las comunidades nativas. (Nota: los nativos americanos son generalmente conocidos como "primeras…

La Asimilación y la Gente Nativa de Metlakahtla, Alaska

This activity explores a petition signed by over 21,000 native Hawaiians against a treaty that would have annexed Hawaii to the United States.

Petition Against Annexation of Hawaii

Following the Civil War, westward expansion in America had an impact on Native American Communities. Students will examine that impact and explore a variety of documents to get a sense of the issues faced by Native Americans due to settlement and U.S. Government Indian policy.

The Impact of Westward Expansion on Native American Communities

Taking a closer look at Lewis & Clark's Expedition out West: Students will analyze primary sources demonstrating various political interests in the West, including the Spanish, French, British, and those of several Native American groups, and place them on a historic map of the West (created for the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase).

Lewis & Clark's Expedition to the Complex West

Students will analyze primary sources with an eye for cause-and-effect relationships.They will identify the roles of government policy and technological improvements in the settlement of the West, and explain their impact on Native Americans.

The Settlement of the American West

The National Archives and the National Museum of the American Indian: A Partnership

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and the National Museum of the American Indian have been working together for many years. Over that time, we have built a strong partnership,…

Indian Nations vs. Settlers on the American Frontier: 1786–1788  Students will compare and contrast two documents from the Revolutionary period written by 1) a combined group of Native American tribes and 2) an American territorial governor, Arthur St. Clair.   Students will analyze the documents to determine how the two sides differed in opinion about the political role of Native American tribes and land claims following the Revolutionary War.

Indian Nations vs. Settlers on the American Frontier: 1786–1788

Assimilation of American Indians: students will analyze primary sources to determine the role and activities the federal government undertook in an attempt to "Americanize" or assimilate Native Americans.

Assimilation of American Indians

Assimilation and the Native People of Metlakahtla, Alaska: students will closely examine a series of pictures from the Tsimshian settlement of Metlakahtla, Alaska. They will identify evidence of cultural assimilation that the community underwent as part of their conversion to the Anglican faith. Finally, they will be asked to state an opinion about whether or not such dramatic cultural assimilation is beneficial or detrimental to Native communities.

Assimilation and the Native People of Metlakahtla, Alaska

NASA and Space Exploration

January 28, 1986 - President Reagan gave this address to the nation following the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger. The President spoke at 5 p.m. from the Oval Office at the White House. The address was broadcast live on nationwide radio and television.

Reagan's Speech on Space Shuttle Challenger

This film created by NASA discusses what had been learned about planet Mars from Earth-based telescopes, observations from the fly-by Mariner spacecraft, and through the Viking landing and orbiter experiments. It also explains the discoveries and new mysteries relating to the planet most like Earth in our solar system.

Planet Mars

Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa was a scientist, inventor, pilot, classical flutist, and became the first Latina astronaut in the world to go to space. Accepted into the NASA Training Program in 1990, she completed training in 1991. Chosen for four missions totaling almost 1,000 hours in space, Ochoa’s final flight was to the International Space Station in 2002. Ochoa's numerous honors include NASA’s highest award, the Distinguished Service Medal.

Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa Playing Flute Aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery

Mercury Seven were to be the first Americans in space. Introduced to the world on April 10, 1959, the men considered themselves to be military test pilots but became instant national heroes. However, the men were caught in the middle of the larger Cold War rivalry and space race between the United States and the Soviet Union. NASA, concerned about the growing competition between the two countries, sent this memo regarding the exchange of visits with Russian astronauts, proposing to publicly…

Memorandum on the Exchange of Visits with Russian Astronauts

Photograph of Astronaut Buzz Aldrin Entering the 30' Altitude Chamber; 1958 - 1974

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin Entering the 30' Altitude Chamber

In this activity, students will analyze a memorandum from the seven Mercury astronauts to the Mercury director encouraging an exchange with astronauts from the Soviet Union.

The Space Race: Project Mercury

Focusing on the Gemini Program, students will learn about the process of space flight in the early years of NASA. Students will sequence a series of photographs from the Gemini missions to learn the steps of a space mission from astronaut training to capsule recovery.

The Process of Early Space Flight: The Gemini Program

Cape Canaveral, Fla.: Astronaut Scott Carpenter looks inside Aurora 7 spacecraft prior to insertion. McDonneld and NASA capsule technicians along with Astronauts Wall Schirra and John Glenn watch Carpenter prepare for his programmed three-orbit mission.

Astronaut Scott Carpenter Looking inside his Aurora 7 Spacecraft prior to Launch

Attorney General Robert Kennedy, McGeorge Bundy, Vice President Lydon Johnson, Arthur Schlesinger, Admiral Arleigh Burke, President John F. Kennedy and Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy watch NASA astronaut Alan B. Shepard on television. Shepard is striding across the deck of the U.S. Navy carrier Lake Champlain following an inspection of his spacecraft on May 5, 1961. He had just completed the first manned suborbital flight in the Project Mercury Program.

Watching the Flight of Astronaut Shepard on Television

Sixth-grade students wrote to the NASA Skylab program asking why the spider taken into space for an experiment on web formation in zero gravity was not fed during space flight.   This document was digitized by teachers in our Primarily Teaching 2015 Summer Workshop in Atlanta.

Letter from Katherine Bishop and Susan Christensen to Sam Walls

Page one of NASA's response to sixth-grade students who wrote to the NASA Skylab program asking why the spider taken into space for an experiment on web formation in zero gravity was not fed during space flight.   This document was digitized by teachers in our Primarily Teaching 2015 Summer Workshop in Atlanta.

Letter from Katherine Bishop and Susan Christensen to Sam Walls

Page two of NASA's response to sixth-grade students who wrote to the NASA Skylab program asking why the spider taken into space for an experiment on web formation in zero gravity was not fed during space flight.     This document was digitized by teachers in our Primarily Teaching 2015 Summer Workshop in Atlanta.

Letter from Katherine Bishop and Susan Christensen to Sam Walls

The prime crew for NASA's first manned Skylab mission meet the press in a final briefing prior to Isolation for the coming launch of Skylab II scheduled for launch no earlier than May 15, 1973 from Launch Complex 39-B, Cape Kennedy, Florida, with a Saturn I-B vehicle. The astronauts are (L. to R.) Charles Conrad Jr., Commander, Paul J. Weitz, Pilot, and Dr. Joseph P. Kerwin, Science Pilot.

Documents

National History Day 2019

Lewis & Clark's Expedition to the Complex West-Mapping History~~~Examine the documents related to the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Determine where different groups were involved and use the hints to place the documents on the X's on the map.

Lewis & Clark's Expedition to the Complex West

Lewis & Clark's Expedition to the Complex West-Mapping History~~~Examine the documents related to the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Determine where different groups were involved and use the hints to place the documents on the X's on the map.

Vietnamese Refugee Children on a Flight to San Francisco

Vietnamese Refugee Children on a Flight to San Francisco

"Fleeing for Liberty"

"Fleeing for Liberty"

Military Police Keep Back Protesters at the Pentagon

Military Police Keep Back Protesters at the Pentagon

"Drop LBJ on North Vietnam" Button

"Drop LBJ on North Vietnam" Button

Washington, DC, Astronaut John Glenn and Mrs. Glenn with their Children Ride with Vice President Johnson in the Washington Parade

Washington, DC, Astronaut John Glenn and Mrs. Glenn with their Children Ride with Vice President Johnson in the Washington Parade

President Lyndon Johnson Signing the Voting Rights Act

President Lyndon Johnson Signing the Voting Rights Act

Civil Rights March On Washington D.C.

Civil Rights March On Washington D.C.

R. R. Moton High School English 9 Class

R. R. Moton High School English 9 Class

Photograph of President Reagan giving a speech at the Berlin Wall, Brandenburg Gate, Federal Republic of Germany

Photograph of President Reagan giving a speech at the Berlin Wall, Brandenburg Gate, Federal Republic of Germany

Opening in the Berlin Wall at Potsdamer Platz

Opening in the Berlin Wall at Potsdamer Platz

Minnesota's Ratification of the 19th Amendment

DocsTeach

Passers-By Looking at Window Display at the Headquarters of National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage

DocsTeach

Woman suffrage in Washington, District of Columbia, Suffragette Banner

DocsTeach

Awaiting the Decision from Paris

Awaiting the Decision from Paris

Dealing Out of Rations in Uniontown, Alabama

Dealing Out of Rations in Uniontown, Alabama

Teacher and Children in Front of Schoolhouse

Teacher and Children in Front of Schoolhouse

Poster Advertising "Indian Territory That Garden of the World, Open for Homestead and Pre-Emption" in Current Day Oklahoma

DocsTeach

Message from President Jefferson to Congress Regarding the Louisiana Purchase

Message from President Jefferson to Congress Regarding the Louisiana Purchase

Voting Record of the Constitutional Convention

Voting Record of the Constitutional Convention

Joining the Tracks for the First Transcontinental Railroad

Joining the Tracks for the First Transcontinental Railroad

Washington Taking Command of the American Army

Washington Taking Command of the American Army

African American History Month

President Bill Clinton greets Shirley Chisholm, Ambassador-Designate to Jamaica, in the Oval Office of the White House. Clinton had nominated Chisholm to be U.S. Ambassador to Jamaica, but she could not serve due to illness.  Chisholm had been elected as the first African American congresswoman in 1968. A teacher by profession who turned to politics, she served in the New York State Assembly before her time in Congress.  National Archives Identifier: 2842929, Clinton Presidential Library

President Clinton Greeting Shirley Chisholm

President Bill Clinton greets Shirley Chisholm, Ambassador-Designate to Jamaica, in the Oval Office of the White House. Clinton had nominated Chisholm to be U.S. Ambassador to Jamaica, but she could not serve due to illness. Chisholm had been elected as the first African American congresswoman in 1968. A teacher by profession who turned to politics, she served in the New York State Assembly before her time in Congress. National Archives Identifier: 2842929, Clinton Presidential Library

eBooks from the National Archives

"Baseball: The National Pastime in the National Archives" is a free eBook for iPad, iPhone, Android, eReader, or ePub-reader extension in your web browser. It tells the story of our national pastime through primary sources: documents, photographs, audio, video, and other records preserved at the National Archives. It covers: baseball during world wars, contracts, civil rights, equal opportunity, steroids, Presidents, improvements to the sport, Little League, Spring Training, and Opening Day!

eBooks

Books and exhibit guides available for your PC, Mac, and mobile device. America and the World: Foreign Affairs in Political Cartoons, 1898–1940 America and the World is an eBook designed to teach students about United States history through the analysis of political cartoons. Putting the Bill of Rights to the Test Workbook This workbook includes primary sources to help students explore some of the core concepts, or protections, found in the Bill of Rights, and how they’ve been tested…

National Archives eBook: "Exploring the United States Constitution." This book shows the workings of the three branches of the federal government as laid out in our Constitution through records in the holdings of the National Archives.

eBooks

Books and exhibit guides available for your PC, Mac, and mobile device. America and the World: Foreign Affairs in Political Cartoons, 1898–1940 America and the World is an eBook designed to teach students about United States history through the analysis of political cartoons. Putting the Bill of Rights to the Test Workbook This workbook includes primary sources to help students explore some of the core concepts, or protections, found in the Bill of Rights, and how they’ve been tested…

National Archives eBook: "The Meaning and Making of Emancipation." This book presents the Emancipation Proclamation in its social and political context with documents that illustrate the efforts of the many Americans, enslaved and free, white and black, by whom slavery was abolished in the United States.

eBooks

Books and exhibit guides available for your PC, Mac, and mobile device. America and the World: Foreign Affairs in Political Cartoons, 1898–1940 America and the World is an eBook designed to teach students about United States history through the analysis of political cartoons. Putting the Bill of Rights to the Test Workbook This workbook includes primary sources to help students explore some of the core concepts, or protections, found in the Bill of Rights, and how they’ve been tested…

Online Exhibits

1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire Documents about the earthquake aftermath, from our archives located in San Francisco. 1948: Year of Turmoil & Triumph Links to research, activities, and photographs related to 1948. From the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum. Amending America Highlighting the remarkably American story of how we have amended, or attempted to amend, the Constitution in order to form a nation that more closely mirrors our ideals.

Other Pins

Explore diverse stories of women who pushed the limits of what was expected and accepted of them.

Learn About Women Who Pushed Boundaries

Explore diverse stories of women who pushed the limits of what was expected and accepted of them.

Historically a woman’s citizenship status in the United States was linked to the man she married. Legislation over the years solidified and then changed this practice.

Learn About the History of Women's Citizenship Rights

Historically a woman’s citizenship status in the United States was linked to the man she married. Legislation over the years solidified and then changed this practice.

Anti-suffragists formed organizations to resist a federal women’s suffrage amendment. Some argued, among other reasons, that involvement in politics would change family roles; others believed it was a decision best left to the states.

Learn About the Anti-Suffrage Movement

Anti-suffragists formed organizations to resist a federal women’s suffrage amendment. Some argued, among other reasons, that involvement in politics would change family roles; others believed it was a decision best left to the states.

Find images of parades, marches, protests, and picketing the White House.

Photos of Protests and Suffrage Activities

Find images of parades, marches, protests, and picketing the White House.

Read documents sent to Congress and others in support of women’s suffrage – from individuals, organizations, and suffrage associations around the country.

Petitions and Letters About Women's History

Read documents sent to Congress and others in support of women’s suffrage – from individuals, organizations, and suffrage associations around the country.

This lesson uses primary sources from the Center for Legislative Archives and the National Archives to engage students in studying the Progressive Era issue of woman suffrage. It features petitions, correspondence, and legislative records sent to Congress as it debated suffrage prior to passage of the 19th Amendment.

Woman’s Place in America: Congress and Woman Suffrage

This lesson uses primary sources from the Center for Legislative Archives and the National Archives to engage students in studying the Progressive Era issue of woman suffrage. It features petitions, correspondence, and legislative records sent to Congress as it debated suffrage prior to passage of the 19th Amendment.

In this activity, students will examine one way that Susan B. Anthony and other suffragists fought for the right to vote.

Suffragist Susan B. Anthony: Petitioning for the Right to Vote- Focusing on Details: Spotlight

In this activity, students will examine one way that Susan B. Anthony and other suffragists fought for the right to vote.

In this activity, students will analyze historical records of Congress and the U.S. Government to understand the sequence of steps in the amendment process. Students will study each document and match it to the step in the process that it illustrates.   When put in proper sequence, the documents will show the process by which the 19th Amendment – prohibiting the Federal Government or states from denying the right to vote on the basis of sex – was added to the Constitution.

The Amendment Process: Ratifying the 19th Amendment- Finding a Sequence

In this activity, students will analyze historical records of Congress and the U.S. Government to understand the sequence of steps in the amendment process. Students will study each document and match it to the step in the process that it illustrates. When put in proper sequence, the documents will show the process by which the 19th Amendment – prohibiting the Federal Government or states from denying the right to vote on the basis of sex – was added to the Constitution.

This lesson uses primary sources from the Center for Legislative Archives and the National Archives to engage students in studying the Progressive Era issue of woman suffrage. It features petitions, correspondence, and legislative records sent to Congress as it debated suffrage prior to passage of the 19th Amendment.

Woman’s Place in America: Congress and Woman Suffrage

This lesson uses primary sources from the Center for Legislative Archives and the National Archives to engage students in studying the Progressive Era issue of woman suffrage. It features petitions, correspondence, and legislative records sent to Congress as it debated suffrage prior to passage of the 19th Amendment.

Students will explore records from the U.S. House of Representatives to discover the story of Harriet Tubman’s Civil War service to the government and her petition to Congress for compensation.

Lesson Plans: Congress and Harriet Tubman's Claim for a Pension (Congress in History)

Students will explore records from the U.S. House of Representatives to discover the story of Harriet Tubman’s Civil War service to the government and her petition to Congress for compensation.

This activity requires students to examine the arrest record of an un-named person. Students will analyze and evaluate the data contained in the document, applying prior knowledge, to discern what happened in the incident and the identity of the person involved. It is Rosa Parks, but her name has been blacked out in the activity.

Examining Rosa Parks's Arrest Record - Focusing on Details

This activity requires students to examine the arrest record of an un-named person. Students will analyze and evaluate the data contained in the document, applying prior knowledge, to discern what happened in the incident and the identity of the person involved. It is Rosa Parks, but her name has been blacked out in the activity.

n this activity, students will explore the struggle for universal suffrage long after both men and women constitutionally had the right to vote. Following a progressive timeline, primary sources highlight voting problems which arose for minority groups throughout the 20th century. Students will answer questions as they work through the documents to reflect on if and when universal suffrage was ultimately achieved.

The 19th Amendment and the Road to Universal Suffrage- Making Connections

n this activity, students will explore the struggle for universal suffrage long after both men and women constitutionally had the right to vote. Following a progressive timeline, primary sources highlight voting problems which arose for minority groups throughout the 20th century. Students will answer questions as they work through the documents to reflect on if and when universal suffrage was ultimately achieved.

Historical documents and a script that the National Archives commissioned about the decades long struggle entitled Failure is Impossible serve as valuable teaching tools.

Woman Suffrage and the 19th Amendment

Historical documents and a script that the National Archives commissioned about the decades long struggle entitled Failure is Impossible serve as valuable teaching tools.

This short comparative analysis activity involves comparing and contrasting two images of marches for freedom: a 1917 a Bastille Day march for women's suffrage, and the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Students will consider the similarities and differences between these two images and hypothesize what major differences these photos might imply about the two social reform movements.

The Suffrage and the Civil Rights Reform Movements - Compare and Contrast

This short comparative analysis activity involves comparing and contrasting two images of marches for freedom: a 1917 a Bastille Day march for women's suffrage, and the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Students will consider the similarities and differences between these two images and hypothesize what major differences these photos might imply about the two social reform movements.

In this activity, students will analyze documents pertaining to the woman suffrage movement as it intensified following passage of the 15th Amendment that guaranteed the right to vote for African American males. Documents were chosen to call attention to the struggle’s length, the movement’s techniques, and the variety of arguments for and against giving women the vote.

Extending Suffrage to Women- Finding a Sequence

In this activity, students will analyze documents pertaining to the woman suffrage movement as it intensified following passage of the 15th Amendment that guaranteed the right to vote for African American males. Documents were chosen to call attention to the struggle’s length, the movement’s techniques, and the variety of arguments for and against giving women the vote.

President Bill Clinton greets Shirley Chisholm, Ambassador-Designate to Jamaica, in the Oval Office of the White House. Clinton had nominated Chisholm to be U.S. Ambassador to Jamaica, but she could not serve due to illness.  Chisholm had been elected as the first African American congresswoman in 1968. A teacher by profession who turned to politics, she served in the New York State Assembly before her time in Congress.  National Archives Identifier: 2842929, Clinton Presidential Library

President Clinton Greeting Shirley Chisholm

President Bill Clinton greets Shirley Chisholm, Ambassador-Designate to Jamaica, in the Oval Office of the White House. Clinton had nominated Chisholm to be U.S. Ambassador to Jamaica, but she could not serve due to illness. Chisholm had been elected as the first African American congresswoman in 1968. A teacher by profession who turned to politics, she served in the New York State Assembly before her time in Congress. National Archives Identifier: 2842929, Clinton Presidential Library