Women in History

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The origin of Women's History Month began in 1981 when Congress passed Pub L. 97-28 that authorized the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as "Women's History Week." For the next five years, Congress continued this tradition of designating a week in March as "Women's History Week." In 1987, Congress finally passed a resolution to proclaim March of each year as Women's History Month.

US National Archives
19th Amendment
Women in Politics and Government
Historic Women
Other Pins

19th Amendment

Share the words of "Battling Bella" on your phone! The November graphic to our 19thAmendment Centennial Calendar features the famous campaign slogan from Congresswoman Bella Abzug.

November Lockscreen for Mobile phone

Share the words of "Battling Bella" on your phone! The November graphic to our 19thAmendment Centennial Calendar features the famous campaign slogan from Congresswoman Bella Abzug.

In this 1948 photo, Mrs. Fresdahl is 82 years old as she casts her vote. This would have been her ninth time casting her vote in a Presidential election.

November Centennial Calendar page

In this 1948 photo, Mrs. Fresdahl is 82 years old as she casts her vote. This would have been her ninth time casting her vote in a Presidential election.

Susan B. Anthony recognized that many of the legal disabilities women faced were the result of their inability to vote. Anthony worked tirelessly her whole adult life fighting for the right to vote, and she was instrumental in bringing the issue to the forefront of American consciousness.

September Centennial Calendar page

Susan B. Anthony recognized that many of the legal disabilities women faced were the result of their inability to vote. Anthony worked tirelessly her whole adult life fighting for the right to vote, and she was instrumental in bringing the issue to the forefront of American consciousness.

June's featured suffragist is Shirley Chisholm. She was elected to Congress in 1968 from New York’s 12th Congressional District. As the first African American woman to ever serve in Congress, her rise to office was propelled by her campaign slogan: “Fighting Shirley Chisholm—Unbought and Unbossed.”  #19thAmendment #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

June Centennial Calendar page

June's featured suffragist is Shirley Chisholm. She was elected to Congress in 1968 from New York’s 12th Congressional District. As the first African American woman to ever serve in Congress, her rise to office was propelled by her campaign slogan: “Fighting Shirley Chisholm—Unbought and Unbossed.” #19thAmendment #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

May's featured suffragist is Mabel Ping-Hua Lee, who began writing and speaking publicly about woman suffrage while a teenager. Notably, in May of 1912 she joined other suffragists to lead a parade (on horseback!) down the streets of New York City,.   Lee marched for women’s enfranchisement even though she was barred from becoming a U.S. citizen because of her race. As a result, she remained unable to vote when New York adopted woman suffrage in 1917 and after the 19th Amendment was…

May Centennial Calendar page

May's featured suffragist is Mabel Ping-Hua Lee, who began writing and speaking publicly about woman suffrage while a teenager. Notably, in May of 1912 she joined other suffragists to lead a parade (on horseback!) down the streets of New York City,. Lee marched for women’s enfranchisement even though she was barred from becoming a U.S. citizen because of her race. As a result, she remained unable to vote when New York adopted woman suffrage in 1917 and after the 19th Amendment was…

While Abigail Adams’s reminder to her husband to “remember the ladies” is often mentioned, her full thoughts on the matter were rather more fiery.  Her concerns were well founded. Women of the time had no legal identity apart from their husbands. They could not vote, they could not own property, or gain custody of their children if divorced.  #19thAmendment #19thAt100 #RightfullyHers

July Centennial Calendar page

While Abigail Adams’s reminder to her husband to “remember the ladies” is often mentioned, her full thoughts on the matter were rather more fiery. Her concerns were well founded. Women of the time had no legal identity apart from their husbands. They could not vote, they could not own property, or gain custody of their children if divorced. #19thAmendment #19thAt100 #RightfullyHers

Remember the famous words of Abigail Adams in July of 1776 when she reminded her husband to "remember the ladies."  #Archives19thAt100 #RightfullyHers

Lockscreen for your phone, July 2020

Remember the famous words of Abigail Adams in July of 1776 when she reminded her husband to "remember the ladies." #Archives19thAt100 #RightfullyHers

Native American lawyer and suffragist Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin was a prominent advocate on behalf of Native women and on Native Americans’ position in mainstream America.  In 1911, Baldwin chose to be photographed in traditional dress  for her personnel file photo for the Office of Indian Affairs. This photograph was a radical act for its time, when she would have been expected to assimilate into white American culture.  Download our commemorative calendar pages for free!

April Calendar Page

Native American lawyer and suffragist Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin was a prominent advocate on behalf of Native women and on Native Americans’ position in mainstream America. In 1911, Baldwin chose to be photographed in traditional dress for her personnel file photo for the Office of Indian Affairs. This photograph was a radical act for its time, when she would have been expected to assimilate into white American culture. Download our commemorative calendar pages for free!

Celebrate Women's History Month with the advice of trailblazer Shirley Chisholm.  We’ve released our first of several lockscreens for your mobile phone! Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

March lockscreen for your phone

Celebrate Women's History Month with the advice of trailblazer Shirley Chisholm. We’ve released our first of several lockscreens for your mobile phone! Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

Celebrate Black History Month with the words of activist and suffragist Mary Church Terrell.  Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

February 2020 lockscreen for your phone

Celebrate Black History Month with the words of activist and suffragist Mary Church Terrell. Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

On March 3, 1913, more than 5,000 suffragists marched along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC. Despite attempts to keep women of color out of the march, many—Ida B. Wells among them—attended.  Many women were verbally and physically assaulted along the parade route while the police stood by, either unwilling or unable to control the crowd.   Download our commemorative calendar for free! Each month we post a new story about the women who fought for the right to vote.

March Calendar Page

On March 3, 1913, more than 5,000 suffragists marched along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC. Despite attempts to keep women of color out of the march, many—Ida B. Wells among them—attended. Many women were verbally and physically assaulted along the parade route while the police stood by, either unwilling or unable to control the crowd. Download our commemorative calendar for free! Each month we post a new story about the women who fought for the right to vote.

February's featured image shows activist Mary Church Terrell. During the lead-up to the passage of the 19th Amendment, Terrell marched at 1913 Suffrage Parade alongside the sisters of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority. She picketed at the White House with members of the National Woman’s Party.  We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share.

19th Amendment at 100: Mary Church Terrell

February's featured image shows activist Mary Church Terrell. During the lead-up to the passage of the 19th Amendment, Terrell marched at 1913 Suffrage Parade alongside the sisters of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority. She picketed at the White House with members of the National Woman’s Party. We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share.

Women were the first to protest the White House. Beginning on January 10, 1917, women seeking voting rights stationed themselves outside the White House, where they would become known as the Silent Sentinels.   We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share on social.

January Facebook image for 19th Amendment Centennial

Women were the first to protest the White House. Beginning on January 10, 1917, women seeking voting rights stationed themselves outside the White House, where they would become known as the Silent Sentinels. We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share on social.

We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share.  January's featured image shows Alison Turnbull Hopkins protesting at the gates of the White House in January of 1917.  Women were the first organized group to protest at the gates of the President’s house. Beginning on January 10, 1917, women seeking voting rights stationed themselves outside the White House. They became known as the Silent Sentinels.

January page of 19th Amendment Centennial Calendar

We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. January's featured image shows Alison Turnbull Hopkins protesting at the gates of the White House in January of 1917. Women were the first organized group to protest at the gates of the President’s house. Beginning on January 10, 1917, women seeking voting rights stationed themselves outside the White House. They became known as the Silent Sentinels.

We’ve released our first of four lockscreens for your mobile phone! Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights.    #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

Lockscreen for 19th Amendment Centennial

We’ve released our first of four lockscreens for your mobile phone! Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

Women in Politics and Government

Rosalynn Carter and Betty Ford at a rally for ERA, 11/19/1977. (National Archives, Carter Presidential Library, ARC 176940)

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From 1923 to 1970, some form of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was introduced in every session of Congress but was held up in committee and  never put to a vote. This petition forced the legislation out of committee so that it could be considered by the House, which passed it. The Senate attempted to add provisions exempting women from the draft, effectively preventing the bill from passing Congress that session. Representative Martha Griffiths's Discharge Petition for ERA, 06/11/1970.

Representative Martha Griffiths's Discharge Petition for the Equal Rights Amendment, 06/11/1970

Original Caption: From 1923 to 1970, some form of the Equal Rights Amendment was introduced in every session of Congress but was generally held up in committee and so never put to a vote. Representative Martha Griffiths's petition forced the legislation out of committee so that it could be considered by the House, which passed it. The Senate subsequently attempted to add provisions exempting women from the draft, effectively preventing the bill from passing Congress that session. Created By…

Will King George Be Forced to This Device?, 06/08/1914. Cartoon by Clifford Berryman. National archives, Record Group 46, ARC 306102

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Huge crowds of unruly men blocked the path of the March 3, 1913, suffrage parade.    Exhibit No. 36, View of the Woman Suffrage Parade from the Willard Hotel, Washington DC, from the Hearings before the Subcommittee of the Committee of the District of Columbia of the United States Senate, pursuant to S. Res 499, March 4, 1913, 63rd Congress (Y4.D63/2:W84); RG 287, National Archives

Suffrage and suffering at the 1913 March

Today’s blog post comes from Jessie Kratz, archives specialist in the Center for Legislative Archives. As woman suffrage advocates marched along Pennsylvania Avenue on March 3, 1913, they wer…

Form Letter from E. Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucy Stone asking friends to send petitions for woman suffrage to their representatives in Congress, 12/26/1865. (National Archives, Record Group 233, ARC 306686)

Form Letter from E. Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucy Stone, 12/26/1865

Original Caption: Form Letter from E. Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucy Stone Asking Friends to Send Petitions for Woman Suffrage to Their Representatives in Congress, 12/26/1865 Created By: U.S. House of Representatives. Committee on the Judiciary.(06/03/1813 - ) From: Record Group/Collection: 233 From: Petitions and Memorials Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, compiled 06/03/1813 - 1998 Production Dates: 12/26/1865 Persistent URL…

Wallace Ellis sent this postcard opposing the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution to New York Congressman Homer P. Snyder. The amendment would grant women the right to vote on a national basis. Ellis’s opposition was in vain, as Congress passed a resolution proposing the amendment in 1919. (National Archives, ARC 1633884)

Anti-Suffrage Postcards from Wallace Ellis to the Honorable Homer P. Snyder

Jeanette Rankin could not vote, but she could be a member of Congress. Two years before the 19th Amendment, she was sworn in as a member of the 65th Congress.

Women can’t vote, but they can run for Congress

Today’s post comes from National Archives Office of Strategy and Communications staff writer Rob Crotty. While the Constitution does not say who is eligible to vote, it does say who is eligib…

Resolution of the Men’s League for Woman Suffrage of King’s County, New York, calling on Congress to investigate the woman suffrage parade, April 14, 1913 (HR 63A-H4.4); Records of the U.S. House of Representatives, National Archives

Suffrage and suffering at the 1913 March

Today’s blog post comes from Jessie Kratz, archives specialist in the Center for Legislative Archives. As woman suffrage advocates marched along Pennsylvania Avenue on March 3, 1913, they wer…

Photograph of Suffrage Parade, 1913

Photograph of Suffrage Parade, 1913

Title: Photograph of Suffrage Parade, 1913 U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 208-PR-14M-3 From: Record Group/Collection: 208 Record Hierarchy Level: Item Reference Unit: Still Picture Records Section Persistent URL: catalog.archives.gov/id/593561 Repository Contact Information: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001. For information about ordering…

"Suffragists arrested for picketing the White House. Photo shows suffragist arrested in front of the White House, Washington, District of Columbia, being escorted into an auto which took her to the station house." 07/14/1917 (NAtional Archives, Record Group 165, ARC 533776)

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(Page 1) In this December 11, 1917, memorial to U.S. House of Representatives member Charles E. Fuller, Alice H. Wadsworth, President of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, argued against the proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. Nonetheless, the 19th Amendment was ratified on August 26, 1920.

Memorial of Alice Wadsworth of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage

Woman suffrage in Washington, District of Columbia. Suffragettes bonfire and posters at the White House, Washington, District of Columbia. (National Archives, Record Group 165, ARC 533773)

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Eleanor Roosevelt votes in Hyde Park, New York, 11/03/1936 by the U.S. National Archives, via Flickr

Eleanor Roosevelt votes in Hyde Park, New York, 11/03/1936

Original Caption: Eleanor Roosevelt votes in Hyde Park, New York, 11/03/1936 From:: Franklin D. Roosevelt Library Public Domain Photographs, compiled 1882 - 1962 Created By:: Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945 Production Date: 11/03/1936 Persistent URL: research.archives.gov/description/196125 Repository: Franklin D. Roosevelt Library (NLFDR) For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit…

Bastille Day spells prison for sixteen suffragettes who picketed the White House. Miss Julia Hurlbut of Morristown, New Jersey, leading the sixteen members of the National Woman's Party who participated in the picketing demonstration in front of the White House, Washington, District of Columbia, July 14,1917, which led to their arrest. These sixteen women were sent to the workhouse at Occoquan, on July 17, 1917, upon their refusal to pay fines, but were pardoned on July 19, 1917.

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Petition of E. Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and others asking for an amendment of the Constitution that shall prohibit the several States from disfanchising any of their citizens on the ground of sex, ca. 1865. National Archives, ARC 306684

Petition of E. Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and others...ca. 1865

Original Caption: Petition of E. Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and others asking for an amendment of the Constitution that shall prohibit the several States from disfanchising any of their citizens on the ground of sex, ca. 1865 From:: Series: Petitions and Memorials, compiled 1813 - 1968 Created By:: U.S. House of Representatives. Committee on the Judiciary. (06/03/1813 - ) Production Date: ca. 1865 Persistent URL: arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=306684…

This cartoon depicts the two big winners on Election Day, 1917, in New York. Voters adopted a woman suffrage amendment to the state constitution, a measure backed by Tammany Hall, New York City's Democratic political machine. On the same day, Democrat John F. Hylan defeated both the Republican Mayor of New York City, John Purroy Mitchel, and Socialist candidate Morris Hillquit. The victory was a major triumph for Tammany Hall, here represented by the proud Tammany Tiger.

The Lady and the Tiger, 11/07/1917

Original Caption: This cartoon depicts the two big winners on Election Day, 1917, in New York. Voters adopted a woman suffrage amendment to the state constitution, a measure backed by Tammany Hall, New York City's Democratic political machine. On the same day, Democrat John F. Hylan defeated both the Republican Mayor of New York City, John Purroy Mitchel, and Socialist candidate Morris Hillquit. The victory was a major triumph for Tammany Hall, here represented by the proud Tammany Tiger…

Women's Suffrage Day in Fountain Square, 08/1973. National Archives, DOCUMERICA, ARC 553307

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Photograph of Jimmy Carter signing extension of Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) Ratification, 10/20/1978. National Archives, ARC 181981.

Photograph of Jimmy Carter Signing Extension of Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) Ratification, 10/20/1978

Original Caption: Photograph of Jimmy Carter Signing Extension of Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) Ratification, 10/20/1978 U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: From:File Unit: Jimmy Carter - Meeting with Irvine Sprague; At ERA Signing with Rosalynn Carter, 10/20/1978 - 10/20/1978 Created By:President (1977-1981 : Carter). White House Staff Photographers. (01/20/1977 - 01/20/1981) Production Date:10/20/1978 Persistent URL: arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=181981…

(Page 3) In this December 11, 1917, memorial to U.S. House of Representatives member Charles E. Fuller, Alice H. Wadsworth, President of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, argued against the proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. Nonetheless, the 19th Amendment was ratified on August 26, 1920.

Memorial of Alice Wadsworth of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage

Suffragists picket the White House. Photo shows suffragists, carrying banner, on picket duty at the east entrance of the White House, Washington, District of Columbia. National Archives, Record Group 165, ARC 533771

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Frances Perkins: Nominated as the first Woman Cabinet member, 80 years ago today, President Roosevelt nominated Frances Perkins of New York to be Secretary of Labor.  A lifelong labor reformer, she rose to prominence following the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Fire. She was confirmed as Secretary of Labor, and was the longest-serving Labor secretary, serving for 12 years.

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Frances Perkins: First Woman Cabinet member 80 years ago today, President Franklin D. Roosevelt notified the U.S. Senate on March 4, 1933, that he had nominated Frances Perkins of New York to be...

Woman Suffrage Headquarters [Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage], Washington, 07/1917. Photo shows the woman suffrage headquarters in Washington, District of Columbia, from which the White House "pickets" set forth, bearing banners inscribed with mottoes advocating suffrage.

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Allied women in Paris to plead for international suffrage. Women representing Allied Nations who called upon the President during his stay in Paris, and asked to be given a place at the Peace Conference, to inquire into and report upon the conditions concerning women and children throughout the world.    Representatives came from United States, France, Belgium, South Africa, Italy, and Poland (02/27/1919).    (National Archives, Record Group 165, ARC 533768)

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Suffragette banner in Washington, District of Columbia (1917-1918). National Archives, Record Group 165, ARC 533777.

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House Joint Resolution 1 proposing the 19th amendment to the states, 1919.

Pieces of History

A blog of the U.S. National Archives

(Page 2) In this December 11, 1917, memorial to U.S. House of Representatives member Charles E. Fuller, Alice H. Wadsworth, President of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, argued against the proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. Nonetheless, the 19th Amendment was ratified on August 26, 1920.

Memorial of Alice Wadsworth of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage

Hillary Rodham Clinton swearing in.  Photography from the William J. Clinton Presidential Library.

Sandra Day O'Connor was born on March 26, 1930. Ronald Reagan had the opportunity to fill three Supreme Court seats during his tenure as President.  Among those confirmed was Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman to sit on the Supreme Court.    On September 25, 1981, O'Connor was sworn in as Supreme Court Justice by Chief Justice Warren Burger. This photo was taken on the day she was sworn in.    Caption: Supreme Court Justices

Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, National Archives and Records Administration

Suffragette Parade in New York City

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Suffragettes at Washington, District of Columbia. Bonfire in front of the White House., 1917 - 1918

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Petition from women of Brookline, Massachusetts, praying that the gag rule be rescinded, 02/14/1838 (National Archives, ARC 306638)

Petition from Women of Brookline, Massachusetts, Praying that the Gag Rule be Rescinded, 02/14/1838

Original Caption: Petition from Women of Brookline, Massachusetts, Praying that the Gag Rule be Rescinded, 02/14/1838 Created By: U.S. House of Representatives.(03/04/1789 - ) From: Record Group/Collection: 233 From: Petitions and Memorials Which Were Tabled Relating to the Rescinding of the Resolution of December 21, 1837 Tabling All Memorials, Petitions, and Papers on Slavery. Production Dates: 02/14/1838 Persistent URL: arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=306638 Reference…

Washington, D.C. Women members of United States Congress: Seated, Senator Maurine Newberger, Oregon; Representative Frances Bolton, Ohio; Senator Margaret Chase Smith, Maine; Standing, Representatives, Florence Dwyer, New Jersey; Martha Griffiths, Michigan; Edith Green, Oregon; Patsy Mink, Hawaii; Leonor Sullivan, Missouri; Julia Hansen, Washington; Edna Kelly, New York; Charlotte Reid, Illinois. (National Archives, ARC 541939)

Washington, D.C. Women members of United States Congress...

Original Caption: Washington, D.C. Women members of United States Congress: Seated, Senator Maurine Newberger, Oregon; Representative Frances Bolton, Ohio; Senator Margaret Chase Smith, Maine; Standing, Representatives, Florence Dwyer, New Jersey; Martha Griffiths, Michigan; Edith Green, Oregon; Patsy Mink, Hawaii; Leonor Sullivan, Missouri; Julia Hansen, Washington; Edna Kelly, New York; Charlotte Reid, Illinois., ca. 1950 - 1975 U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 306-PS-D65(1940)…

Women munition workers urge President to support suffrage bill. Six women war workers, representing thousands of others, were delegated to see President Wilson and urge him to support the motion for an immediate passage of the federal suffrage amendment. These women were employed at Bethlehem Steel Company's plant at Newcastle, PA. From left to right: Miss Mary Gonzon, Mrs. Florence B. Hilles, Miss Lulu Patterson, Mrs. Marie McKensie, Miss Aida Walling and Mrs. Catherine Boyle.

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First Lady Betty Ford expressing her support for the Equal Rights Amendment in Hollywood, Florida, 02/25/1975. (National Archives, Ford Presidential Library, ARC 5730761)

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Historic Women

Photograph of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton Taping a Larry King Weekend Show. 9/30/1993

Photograph of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton Taping a Larry King Weekend Show. 9/30/1993

Sally Ride], America's first woman astronaut communicates with ground controllers from the flight deck during the six day mission of the Challenger. NASA. 6/18/1983 - 6/24/1983

Sally Ride], America's first woman astronaut communicates with ground controllers from the flight deck during the six day mission of the Challenger. NASA. 6/18/1983 - 6/24/1983

Amelia Earhart, 7/30/1936

Amelia Earhart, 7/30/1936

First Woman Justice, Sandra Day O'Connor Being Sworn in a Supreme Court Justice by Chief Justice Warren Burger, Her Husband John O'Connor Looks On. 9/25/1981

First Woman Justice, Sandra Day O'Connor Being Sworn in a Supreme Court Justice by Chief Justice Warren Burger, Her Husband John O'Connor Looks On. 9/25/1981

Photograph of the Swearing-In of Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg as Associate Supreme Court Justice, with President William J. Clinton Attending. 8/10/1993

Photograph of the Swearing-In of Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg as Associate Supreme Court Justice, with President William J. Clinton Attending. 8/10/1993

Other Pins

Share the words of "Battling Bella" on your phone! The November graphic to our 19thAmendment Centennial Calendar features the famous campaign slogan from Congresswoman Bella Abzug.

November Lockscreen for Mobile phone

Share the words of "Battling Bella" on your phone! The November graphic to our 19thAmendment Centennial Calendar features the famous campaign slogan from Congresswoman Bella Abzug.

In this 1948 photo, Mrs. Fresdahl is 82 years old as she casts her vote. This would have been her ninth time casting her vote in a Presidential election.

November Centennial Calendar page

In this 1948 photo, Mrs. Fresdahl is 82 years old as she casts her vote. This would have been her ninth time casting her vote in a Presidential election.

Susan B. Anthony recognized that many of the legal disabilities women faced were the result of their inability to vote. Anthony worked tirelessly her whole adult life fighting for the right to vote, and she was instrumental in bringing the issue to the forefront of American consciousness.

September Centennial Calendar page

Susan B. Anthony recognized that many of the legal disabilities women faced were the result of their inability to vote. Anthony worked tirelessly her whole adult life fighting for the right to vote, and she was instrumental in bringing the issue to the forefront of American consciousness.

June's featured suffragist is Shirley Chisholm. She was elected to Congress in 1968 from New York’s 12th Congressional District. As the first African American woman to ever serve in Congress, her rise to office was propelled by her campaign slogan: “Fighting Shirley Chisholm—Unbought and Unbossed.”  #19thAmendment #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

June Centennial Calendar page

June's featured suffragist is Shirley Chisholm. She was elected to Congress in 1968 from New York’s 12th Congressional District. As the first African American woman to ever serve in Congress, her rise to office was propelled by her campaign slogan: “Fighting Shirley Chisholm—Unbought and Unbossed.” #19thAmendment #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

May's featured suffragist is Mabel Ping-Hua Lee, who began writing and speaking publicly about woman suffrage while a teenager. Notably, in May of 1912 she joined other suffragists to lead a parade (on horseback!) down the streets of New York City,.   Lee marched for women’s enfranchisement even though she was barred from becoming a U.S. citizen because of her race. As a result, she remained unable to vote when New York adopted woman suffrage in 1917 and after the 19th Amendment was…

May Centennial Calendar page

May's featured suffragist is Mabel Ping-Hua Lee, who began writing and speaking publicly about woman suffrage while a teenager. Notably, in May of 1912 she joined other suffragists to lead a parade (on horseback!) down the streets of New York City,. Lee marched for women’s enfranchisement even though she was barred from becoming a U.S. citizen because of her race. As a result, she remained unable to vote when New York adopted woman suffrage in 1917 and after the 19th Amendment was…

While Abigail Adams’s reminder to her husband to “remember the ladies” is often mentioned, her full thoughts on the matter were rather more fiery.  Her concerns were well founded. Women of the time had no legal identity apart from their husbands. They could not vote, they could not own property, or gain custody of their children if divorced.  #19thAmendment #19thAt100 #RightfullyHers

July Centennial Calendar page

While Abigail Adams’s reminder to her husband to “remember the ladies” is often mentioned, her full thoughts on the matter were rather more fiery. Her concerns were well founded. Women of the time had no legal identity apart from their husbands. They could not vote, they could not own property, or gain custody of their children if divorced. #19thAmendment #19thAt100 #RightfullyHers

Remember the famous words of Abigail Adams in July of 1776 when she reminded her husband to "remember the ladies."  #Archives19thAt100 #RightfullyHers

Lockscreen for your phone, July 2020

Remember the famous words of Abigail Adams in July of 1776 when she reminded her husband to "remember the ladies." #Archives19thAt100 #RightfullyHers

Native American lawyer and suffragist Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin was a prominent advocate on behalf of Native women and on Native Americans’ position in mainstream America.  In 1911, Baldwin chose to be photographed in traditional dress  for her personnel file photo for the Office of Indian Affairs. This photograph was a radical act for its time, when she would have been expected to assimilate into white American culture.  Download our commemorative calendar pages for free!

April Calendar Page

Native American lawyer and suffragist Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin was a prominent advocate on behalf of Native women and on Native Americans’ position in mainstream America. In 1911, Baldwin chose to be photographed in traditional dress for her personnel file photo for the Office of Indian Affairs. This photograph was a radical act for its time, when she would have been expected to assimilate into white American culture. Download our commemorative calendar pages for free!

Celebrate Women's History Month with the advice of trailblazer Shirley Chisholm.  We’ve released our first of several lockscreens for your mobile phone! Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

March lockscreen for your phone

Celebrate Women's History Month with the advice of trailblazer Shirley Chisholm. We’ve released our first of several lockscreens for your mobile phone! Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

Celebrate Black History Month with the words of activist and suffragist Mary Church Terrell.  Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

February 2020 lockscreen for your phone

Celebrate Black History Month with the words of activist and suffragist Mary Church Terrell. Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

On March 3, 1913, more than 5,000 suffragists marched along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC. Despite attempts to keep women of color out of the march, many—Ida B. Wells among them—attended.  Many women were verbally and physically assaulted along the parade route while the police stood by, either unwilling or unable to control the crowd.   Download our commemorative calendar for free! Each month we post a new story about the women who fought for the right to vote.

March Calendar Page

On March 3, 1913, more than 5,000 suffragists marched along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC. Despite attempts to keep women of color out of the march, many—Ida B. Wells among them—attended. Many women were verbally and physically assaulted along the parade route while the police stood by, either unwilling or unable to control the crowd. Download our commemorative calendar for free! Each month we post a new story about the women who fought for the right to vote.

February's featured image shows activist Mary Church Terrell. During the lead-up to the passage of the 19th Amendment, Terrell marched at 1913 Suffrage Parade alongside the sisters of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority. She picketed at the White House with members of the National Woman’s Party.  We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share.

19th Amendment at 100: Mary Church Terrell

February's featured image shows activist Mary Church Terrell. During the lead-up to the passage of the 19th Amendment, Terrell marched at 1913 Suffrage Parade alongside the sisters of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority. She picketed at the White House with members of the National Woman’s Party. We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share.

Women were the first to protest the White House. Beginning on January 10, 1917, women seeking voting rights stationed themselves outside the White House, where they would become known as the Silent Sentinels.   We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share on social.

January Facebook image for 19th Amendment Centennial

Women were the first to protest the White House. Beginning on January 10, 1917, women seeking voting rights stationed themselves outside the White House, where they would become known as the Silent Sentinels. We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share on social.

We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share.  January's featured image shows Alison Turnbull Hopkins protesting at the gates of the White House in January of 1917.  Women were the first organized group to protest at the gates of the President’s house. Beginning on January 10, 1917, women seeking voting rights stationed themselves outside the White House. They became known as the Silent Sentinels.

January page of 19th Amendment Centennial Calendar

We’re commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with 12 suffrage stories from our holdings for you to save, print, or share. January's featured image shows Alison Turnbull Hopkins protesting at the gates of the White House in January of 1917. Women were the first organized group to protest at the gates of the President’s house. Beginning on January 10, 1917, women seeking voting rights stationed themselves outside the White House. They became known as the Silent Sentinels.

We’ve released our first of four lockscreens for your mobile phone! Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights.    #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

Lockscreen for 19th Amendment Centennial

We’ve released our first of four lockscreens for your mobile phone! Think about the women who fought for the #19thAmendment every time you use your #1stAmendment rights. #RightfullyHers #Archives19thAt100

Rosalynn Carter and Betty Ford at a rally for ERA, 11/19/1977. (National Archives, Carter Presidential Library, ARC 176940)

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