Alex

Alex

xandere.carbonmade.com
Manchester, United Kingdom / Design Student :)
Alex
More ideas from Alex
Maple -- punchy and bright with a nice bite on the high end. Because it's very heavy, it's often used only as a laminated top and not for the entire body. Maple can be highly decorative with "flame" and "quilted" grain patterns, finished with a transparent color which allows the grain to shine through.

Maple -- punchy and bright with a nice bite on the high end. Because it's very heavy, it's often used only as a laminated top and not for the entire body. Maple can be highly decorative with "flame" and "quilted" grain patterns, finished with a transparent color which allows the grain to shine through.

Mahogany -- provides deep, warm mids, good sustain and nice "bite," and is famous for its heavy "crunch." It's a hard, heavy wood with an open grain and a reddish color.

Mahogany -- provides deep, warm mids, good sustain and nice "bite," and is famous for its heavy "crunch." It's a hard, heavy wood with an open grain and a reddish color.

Basswood -- great sounding with a tonal response very similar to alder. It's lightweight, but a little soft so basswood guitars need to be well taken care of.

Basswood -- great sounding with a tonal response very similar to alder. It's lightweight, but a little soft so basswood guitars need to be well taken care of.

Poplar -- nicely resonant with a meaty tone and similar sound characteristics to alder. Lightweight with soft grain pattern, it's lighter in color than alder and is usually painted.

Poplar -- nicely resonant with a meaty tone and similar sound characteristics to alder. Lightweight with soft grain pattern, it's lighter in color than alder and is usually painted.

exhibits a "snappier" tone with a bright edge, but with a warm bass and long sustain. Light colored, medium weight with attractive grain, ash is the other "traditional" body wood.

exhibits a "snappier" tone with a bright edge, but with a warm bass and long sustain. Light colored, medium weight with attractive grain, ash is the other "traditional" body wood.

Alder -- full and rich, with fat low-end, nice cutting mids, and good overall warmth and sustain. Alder is one of the "traditional" lightweight body woods and is fairly inexpensive. It's grain is not very distinct so it is usually painted in solid colors.

Details about my Carvin Bolt-T guitar.

FINGERBOARD WOODS-  The fingerboard is generally made from rosewood, ebony or maple. The warmest sounding fingerboards are maple, followed by rosewood, and ebony is the brightest. If you want more sustain, go with rosewood. Ebony and maple are better suited to faster playing styles where a quick decay is preferred. This is just a guide, though. Plenty of musicians play fast on rosewood fingerboards and some musicians get fat sustain on ebony.

FINGERBOARD WOODS- The fingerboard is generally made from rosewood, ebony or maple. The warmest sounding fingerboards are maple, followed by rosewood, and ebony is the brightest. If you want more sustain, go with rosewood. Ebony and maple are better suited to faster playing styles where a quick decay is preferred. This is just a guide, though. Plenty of musicians play fast on rosewood fingerboards and some musicians get fat sustain on ebony.

Neck-Through Body  (or "Through" neck)-  This neck is one piece of wood glued into the body, passing through its entire length. The result is a very stable, solid-feeling guitar. Some people insist that this design creates maximum sustain because the strings are attached from both ends to one piece of wood. You will likely pay more for a guitar with this type of neck joint because it is more costly to produce. An if it becomes damaged (hard to do!), it will be more expensive to fix.

Neck-Through Body (or "Through" neck)- This neck is one piece of wood glued into the body, passing through its entire length. The result is a very stable, solid-feeling guitar. Some people insist that this design creates maximum sustain because the strings are attached from both ends to one piece of wood. You will likely pay more for a guitar with this type of neck joint because it is more costly to produce. An if it becomes damaged (hard to do!), it will be more expensive to fix.

Set-In  (or "Set") Neck-  The set-in neck is glued into a precisely fitted pocket on the body. Some people insist that the glued joint provides increased sustain and richness of tone. Many popular guitars use a set-neck construction. If the neck has to be reset or replaced, more work (and expense) is involved.

Set-In (or "Set") Neck- The set-in neck is glued into a precisely fitted pocket on the body. Some people insist that the glued joint provides increased sustain and richness of tone. Many popular guitars use a set-neck construction. If the neck has to be reset or replaced, more work (and expense) is involved.

This neck is bolted onto the body with four screws. Some people insist that it offers somewhat less sustain because it provides less wood to wood contact (we've seen many killer bolt-on neck guitars with more sustain than many set-neck models). A bolt-on neck has become very popular in guitars and does have its advantages. It is not expensive to make. It creates a bright, focused tone which is perfect for lead guitar.  And, if the neck becomes damaged, it is possible to remove it and repair…

This neck is bolted onto the body with four screws. Some people insist that it offers somewhat less sustain because it provides less wood to wood contact (we've seen many killer bolt-on neck guitars with more sustain than many set-neck models). A bolt-on neck has become very popular in guitars and does have its advantages. It is not expensive to make. It creates a bright, focused tone which is perfect for lead guitar. And, if the neck becomes damaged, it is possible to remove it and repair…