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Photos: The Amazing Costume Culture of Africa's Herero Tribe | Wired Design | Wired.com

Photos: The Amazing Costume Culture of Africa’s Herero Tribe

Photos: The Amazing Costume Culture of Africa's Herero Tribe | Wired Design | Wired.com

Himba woman with Erembe headdress signifying married status, Kaokoland, Namibia

Himba woman with Erembe headdress signifying married status, Kaokoland, Namibia

Herero, Namibia

Herero, Namibia

Howard Carter opening the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun. Feb 12, 1924

Howard Carter opening the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun. Feb 12, 1924

Rarity finest old Benin Bronze head

Rarity finest old Benin Bronze head

Plaque featuring Mudfish-legged Oba and two sacrificial leopards brass 17th century

Plaque featuring Mudfish-legged Oba and two sacrificial leopards brass 17th century

Mali; Bamana peoples Komo kun (head of Komo) Wood, quill, feather, horn H. 24.8 cm (9 3/4") Detroit Institute of Arts

Mali; Bamana peoples Komo kun (head of Komo) Wood, quill, feather, horn H. 24.8 cm (9 3/4") Detroit Institute of Arts

Africa | Two pectorals "soul washer discs" from the Asante people of Ghana | Gold alloy | Each 600CHF ~ sold (June/12)

Africa | Two pectorals "soul washer discs" from the Asante people of Ghana | Gold alloy | Each 600CHF ~ sold (June/12)

Ori Inu  Inner Head Sculpture from Ife (Yoruba) Nigeria

Ori Inu Inner Head Sculpture from Ife (Yoruba) Nigeria

Dahsyur - the bent pyramid of Egypt. Bent due to some architectural hiccups during construction. The structure of the inside is very interesting!

Dahsyur - the bent pyramid of Egypt. Bent due to some architectural hiccups during construction. The structure of the inside is very interesting!

Lydenburg Head Eastern Transvaal, South Africa, c. 500-700, clay; traces of white pigment and specularite 38 × 26 × 25.5 cm University of Cape Town Collection at the South Africa Museum, Cape Town

Lydenburg Head Eastern Transvaal, South Africa, c. 500-700, clay; traces of white pigment and specularite 38 × 26 × 25.5 cm University of Cape Town Collection at the South Africa Museum, Cape Town

Efundula fest, Ovambo, Namibia

Efundula fest, Ovambo, Namibia

The Golden Stool (Ashanti-Twi: Sika 'dwa) is the royal and divine throne of the Ashanti people. According to legend, Okomfo Anokye, High Priest and one of the two chief founders of the Asante Confederacy, caused the stool to descend from the sky and land on the lap of the first Asante king, Osei Tutu. Such seats were traditionally symbolic of a chieftain's leadership, but the Golden Stool is believed to house the spirit of the Asante nation—living, dead and yet to be born.

The Golden Stool (Ashanti-Twi: Sika 'dwa) is the royal and divine throne of the Ashanti people. According to legend, Okomfo Anokye, High Priest and one of the two chief founders of the Asante Confederacy, caused the stool to descend from the sky and land on the lap of the first Asante king, Osei Tutu. Such seats were traditionally symbolic of a chieftain's leadership, but the Golden Stool is believed to house the spirit of the Asante nation—living, dead and yet to be born.

Africa | The Golden Stool of the Asante was hidden in 1896 to prevent it from falling into British hands.  After it was accidentally rediscovered in 1920, some of its gold ornaments were stolen and melted down.  Today it is sometimes displayed on great public occasions, such as the Yam Festival in Kumasi.. | ©Rene and Denise David. Kumasi, 1985

Africa | The Golden Stool of the Asante was hidden in 1896 to prevent it from falling into British hands. After it was accidentally rediscovered in 1920, some of its gold ornaments were stolen and melted down. Today it is sometimes displayed on great public occasions, such as the Yam Festival in Kumasi.. | ©Rene and Denise David. Kumasi, 1985

The Kingdom of Benin held many objects of carved ivory: most elaborately decorated human masks, animals, beakers, spoons, gongs, trumpets, arm ornaments, and large elephant tusks covered with bands in figured relief. The representations of these objects served above all to exalt the king, or Oba.

The Kingdom of Benin held many objects of carved ivory: most elaborately decorated human masks, animals, beakers, spoons, gongs, trumpets, arm ornaments, and large elephant tusks covered with bands in figured relief. The representations of these objects served above all to exalt the king, or Oba.