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Black Historians


Black Historians

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Dr. Dorothy Lavinia Brown (January 7, 1919 – June 13, 2004, also known as "Dr. D.", was an African-American surgeon, legislator, and teacher. She was the first female surgeon of African-American ancestry from the Southeastern United States. She was also the first African American to serve in the Tennessee General Assembly having been elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives.

Dorothy Lavinia Brown - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.m.wikipedia.org

Like many of the early Jazz musicians from Memphis, Tennessee, Buster Bailey got his start playing with W.C. Handy's Orchestra.

Stevie Wonder shares a laugh with his friend, Minnie Riperton, at a party in 1975. Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty.

Barack Obama

29 Photos Of Baby Barack Obama

buzzfeed.com

Ms. Josephine Baker

When Revlon released its fragrance Charlie in 1973, the ad campaigns featured models Shelley Hack, Charlie Stember, and, notably, Naomi Sims, making Sims the first African American woman in history to be featured in a cosmetic company's advertising.

Ruth Ellis. She came out as a lesbian around 1915, and graduated from Springfield High School in 1919, at a time when fewer than seven percent of African Americans graduated from secondary school. In the 1920s, she met the only woman she ever lived with, Ceciline “Babe” Franklin. Their house was a central location for gay and lesbian parties, and also served as a refuge for African American gays and lesbians. Throughout her life, Ellis advocated for gays & lesbians, & for African Americans.

Today in Black History, 1/6/2014 - John Daniel Singleton, was the first African American as well as the youngest person ever nominated for best director. For more info, check out today's blog!

Today in Black History, 1/6/2014

thewright.org

Lena Horne and children

Today in Black History, 4/22/2014 - Henry Thomas Sampson, Jr. was the first African American to earn a doctorate in nuclear engineering in the United States. For more info, check out today's blog!

Today in Black History, 4/22/2014

thewright.org

Mary McLeod Bethune: Very few people realize that in 1949 Mary McLeod Bethune received two historic awards. The Haitian Medal of Honor & Merit & The Commander of the Order of the Star of Africa.

Nathan Francis Mossell (1856-1946) was an African American doctor who helped establish the first black hospital in Philadelphia.

Ralph Bunche is the first African American Nobel Peace Prize winner. He was awarded in 1950 for his successful mediation of a ceasefire between four Arab nations and the State of Israel. (photo: Ralph Bunche Carl Van Vechten Photographs Collection, Library of Congress)

A Time for Mediation | Ralph Bunche | Nobel Recipient | PBS

pbs.org

"Even as a young girl, Elizabeth Catlett knew she wanted to be an artist. This aspiration -- at a time when few African American women were practicing artists, and art museums in the South were closed to African Americans -- is a testament to her family's support and commitment to education. Against all odds, she tenaciously pursued her vision despite the denial of educational and exhibition opportunities to African American artists at that time." - portrait by Kwaku Alston

Black Artist News: GENESIS: Elizabeth Catlett / April 15, 1915

blackartistnews.blogspot.com

Ed Bradley, journalist & one of the 1st African Americans to break into network TV news. He is best known for 26 years of award-winning work on 60 Minutes. During his career he covered the fall of Saigon, was the 1st Black TV correspondent to cover the White House, and anchored CBS Sunday Night with Ed Bradley. He received the Peabody, the NABJ Lifetime Achievement Award, 19 Emmys and others. Known for his style, he was the 1st male correspondent to regularly wear an earring on the air. R.I.P.

Yinka Shonibare, MBE, is a British-Nigerian artist living in London. He is best known for his exploration of colonialism and post-colonialism within the contemporary context of globalisationhttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Yinka-Shonibare-MBE/103098046576

Yinka Shonibare MBE || National Museum of African Art

africa.si.edu

Jean Michel Basquiat is a famous African American artist . He not only makes paintings he also make sculptures .

Artist Aaron Douglas - Douglas heavily influenced by African Culture he painted for. Natural Talent plus Newly Acquired Inspiration allowed Douglas to be considered "Father of African American arts." That title led him to say," Do not call me the Father of African American Arts, for I am just a son of Africa, and paint for what inspires me." www.aiga.org/...

AIGA | Aaron Douglas

aiga.org

Saint Elmo Brady (December 22, 1884 - December 25, 1966) was the first African American to obtain a Ph.D. degree in chemistry in the United States, which he earned in 1916 from the University of Illinois. He taught at Tuskegee, Fisk, Howard and Tougaloo, and was the first African American admitted to Phi Lambda Upsilon, the chemistry honor society. #TodayInBlackHistory

The 1st African American International Grand Master in Chess aalbc.it/gmmaurice

Maurice Ashley, Author and Chess Grand Master

aalbc.com

Joycelyn Elders, First African American appointed Surgeon General of the United States

Jacob Lawrence- Influential African American artist known for his "Migration" series

Jane Bolin was the first black woman judge in the United States. Born April 11, 1908 in Poughkeepsie, New York, Bolin always knew she wanted to be a lawyer. Her father, Gaius Bolin, the first African American graduate of Williams College, practiced law in Poughkeepsie. Bolin graduated from Wellesley College in 1928, and received her law degree from Yale University School of Law in 1931.

Anna Murray-Douglass was born around October 19, 1813. She was an Black abolitionist, member of the Underground Railroad, and the first wife of American social reformer and statesman Frederick Douglass, from 1838 to her death.

When Orrin C. Evans died in 1971 at the age of 68, he was eulogized in the New York Times as ‘the dean of black reporters’. We can also say he was the father of black comicbooks. Born in 1902 in Steeleton, Pennsylvania, the eldest son of George J. Evans Sr, & Maude Wilson Evans, he was employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad. His wife was the first black to graduate from the Williamsport Teachers’ College. Despite a stable home life, every day realities of racism were never far from their door.

tomchristopher.com: The Story of All Negro Comics

tomchristopher.com